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The Coal Thread

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CLEAN COAL is coal chemically washed of minerals and impurities, sometimes gasified, burned and the resulting flue gases treated with steam and reburned so as to make the carbon dioxide in the flue gas economically recoverable. The carbon dioxide can then be captured and stored instead of being released into the atmosphere.

The primary example of clean coal is the proposed U.S. FutureGen plant - a zero-emissions coal-fired power plant.

 

It is also widely believed that some process similar to the natural gas fuel cell or microbial fuel cell (charged from biomass or sewage) may be practical using coal as fuel. Those technologies are used mostly for stationary fuel cells as charging is slow. A large power plant in a coal mine might be the most energy efficient approach and require the least transport of coal to the users.

 

The US generates 50% of its electricity from coal, and has the world's largest coal reserves. China laso has big coal reserves, but much of it is hig sulfur, dirty coal.

 

- -

US Coal Prices - per EIA ... for update

wklyspot060901.gif

 

Net Generation by Major Energy Source:

Total (All Sectors), July 2005 through June 2006

fig2.jpg : source

 

- - -

counter img

 

My Old Favorite Links:

 

Coal Price..... : http://www.CoalPrice.com ((owned by a friend- for sale??))

Advfn thread : http://www.advfn.com/cmn/fbb/thread.php3?id=1217129

Coal Prices... : http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/data/coalprice.html

 

Other Links

 

Futures exchanges prices

 

http://www.nymex.com/

Coal futures are traded on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Apart from the current price quotes and charts, the site provides some historic price data.

 

Current price information

 

http://www.globalcoal.com/

Spectron Global Coal provides price indices for members. Registration is free of charge. Forward and spot prices are provided for a number of types of coal, and for different locations. Historical graphs are also available (starting in 1999).

 

http://www.worldbank.org/prospects/pinksheets/

The World Bank provides (in html and acrobat format) commodity price data. You can find annual, quarterly, and monthly averages. The pink sheet for each month contains the data from the previous month.

 

http://www.energy-coal-eur.com

Euriscoal web site provides coal prices, average prices CIF main European ports for Cooking Coal and for Steam Coal based on publications of the European Commission, McCloskey Information Services Ltd, and Coal Week International, with maximum 1.5 year of historic data.

 

Country-level prices

 

http://www.eia.doe.gov/price.html

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is a member of Fedstats, which provides statistics from more than 70 agencies in the U.S. Federal Government. This web site gives historic coal price series monthly and annually since 1973.

 

http://www.fieldston.com/cd.html

Coal Daily lets you quickly and easily track the U.S. coal market developments, including spot coal prices, plus market and business news.

 

http://www.dme.gov.za/

The Department of Minerals and Energy of South Africa provides bulletins on minerals or energy on request. Samples are available on line

 

= =

 

Coal & Energy Price Report : http://www.energypublishing.biz/newsletter/freetrial.php#

 

Took Free trials on...

Domestic Coal Guide (one sample issue)

mORE TO COME??

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My Old Favorite Links:

 

Coal Price..... : http://www.CoalPrice.com ((owned by a friend- for sale??))

Advfn thread : http://www.advfn.com/cmn/fbb/thread.php3?id=1217129

 

= =

 

Found This:

 

The Best Market News & Prices Available Daily!

 

When Energy Publishing launched its Coal & Energy Price Report, a daily focused on coal and energy prices, market trends and significant industry developments – we wanted it to be the best news source available to the industry. So we…

• Developed the best market index available

• Added a large dose of timely market news

• Provided several tools to help you track coal and energy pricing

• Made the entire package available to you at mid-morning each business day by e-mail or fax.

 

Our optimism and hard work have paid off, and many in the industry have added Coal & Energy Price Report to their arsenal of information tools. Now we want you to join us as well, and while we don’t have an offer you can’t refuse, we do have one that we think you’ll want to accept. We’ll set you up with a FREE trial of Coal & Energy Price Report. We think you’ll be sold. WHY?

 

FREE TRIAL : http://www.energypublishing.biz/newsletter/freetrial.php#

 

Took Free trials on...

Domestic Coal Guide (one sample issue)

mORE TO COME??

 

Clean Coal Technology could be a boon for countries like Wales where we've got so much of the stuff it's embarrassing. We could easily be self-sufficient in energy and as the Senedd (Welsh Parliament) have rejected the possibility of building any further Nuclear Powerstations after Wylfa etc are decommissioned this has been suggested as a way forward.

 

Of course this would mean that someone will have to go and get it, which is the mucky part.

 

Anybody see the news about Sasol (Sth African co) and their pioneering usage of the Fischer-Tropsch method of coal pulverisation to produce aviation fuel?

 

They say that they can now produce pure aviation fuel (and not just as a blend) from Coal only via this method. Doubt if it's very clean mind, but will probably save a few airlines a pretty penny in fuel costs.

 

Ryannair Flight to Paris 50 pence please.

 

Anybody know of any British Companies doing something similar with this technology, or is that too pro-active in terms of an Energy Future and will they just muddle through?

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You might want to look at :

 

Coal International (CLN.L)

bigbv0.gif

 

and its parent co., Cambrian Mining

 

CLN looks cheap. I own some from a higher price.

And also some shares in EnergyBuild, a pre-IPO company, which which they have partnered to develop a coal project in Wales

 

i am still trying to figure out what to do with the domain name:

www.CoalPrice.com : could be valuable in this rising energy market

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You might want to look at :

 

Coal International (CLN.L)

bigbv0.gif

 

and its parent co., Cambrian Mining

 

CLN looks cheap. I own some from a higher price.

And also some shares in EnergyBuild, a pre-IPO company, which which they have partnered to develop a coal project in Wales

 

i am still trying to figure out what to do with the domain name:

www.CoalPrice.com : could be valuable in this rising energy market

 

Thanks Dr B,

I shall look into Coal International.

 

I didn't even realise that Cambrian Mining were still in operation.

 

Now all we need to do is get our Cloggau Gold Mines into some kind of serious operation and maybe Wales has an economic future after all.

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Coal terminal to get capacity boost.

 

Posted: 20-SEP-06 // excerpt

 

JOHANNESBURG (Mineweb.com) --Richards Bay Coal Terminal, the world's largest coal export port facility, will soon begin a R1.1 billion ($150 million) expansion project that will increase its annual capacity to 91 million tons from the current level of 72 million tons.

 

When the terminal began operating 30 years ago, it had capacity for handling just 12 million tons a year.

 

The private terminal is owned by Anglo Coal, Xstrata Coal, Eyesizwe, Ingwe, Kangra Coal, Sasol and Total Coal South Africa.

 

@: http://www.mineweb.net/energy/190958.htm

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THE RETURN OF KING COAL

by Nick Louth

 

How will you heat your home or fuel your car 10 years from now? The North Sea is running out of oil and gas. Global oil reserves are dwindling. Most of what remains sits beneath unstable countries in the Middle East.

 

There is plenty of natural gas in Russia and Central Asia. But how secure is Britain's supply now the Kremlin can turn the taps off at will? Alternative energy, for all its promise, faces costly development and planning problems. And how can we return to nuclear power when no one has worked out where to dispose of the waste, nor how much it will cost?

 

Yet while the world frets about oil and gas supplies, the answer to Britain's energy problem may be literally underneath our feet.

 

Coal, lying in thick and sometimes untouched seams, is present in just those countries which need it. There is enough in proven reserves to last the world 164 years at current rates of use. Natural gas will last perhaps 67 years at most. Proven oil reserves will last only 41 years, perhaps less now that China and India are getting rid of their bicycles and starting to drive cars just like we do.

 

Few people in Britain these days use coal at home, however. Only the oldest power stations run on it. Coal is still seen as old-fashioned, dirty, a stain on the environment, a byword for industrial accidents and industrial strife. Britain's deep coal mines were "uneconomic" in the words of Mrs Thatcher. Yet now, 20 years after the British deep-mined coal industry was dragged like a cantankerous old horse to the knacker's yard, coal has a future again.

 

Coal may forever be associated with dirt and grime. But huge progress has been made in making it no worse for the environment than other fuels. Modern techniques include washing it and sorting out impurities before the coal is pulverised. Once the fuel is burned, the sulphur dioxide gases it releases (and which cause acid rain) are removed through special units installed within cooling towers.

 

These "wet scrubbers" spray a mixture of limestone powder and water into the hot gases. By a chemical reaction this produces a dust, which then falls within the chimney. It is then collected and used for making builder's plaster.

 

More dust is removed by giving it an electrical charge – rather like static on nylon clothing. This attracts the dirt onto special plates. Overall, modern clean coal technology can remove 99% of pollutants.

 

This is not to say that coal is clean everywhere it's used. Far from it. China's huge coal industry is as Dickensian as anything seen during Britain's industrial revolution, and not just because of the pollution caused by its aged plants. China produces 35% of the world's coal, but it accounts for 80% of its mining deaths. More than 7,000 miners die in China each year, and the figure is only gradually falling.

 

Globally, coal is used in power generation and steel manufacture, particularly in China and India. Their generators and mills demand high quality foreign coking coal in particular. But the adaptability of coal, largely forgotten in recent decades, is also being explored anew, because of its newly-found competitiveness. For investors, this offers huge potential. Coal is dramatically underpriced compared with competing fuels like natural gas, whose price moves up in line with oil.

 

Compare the market value of Peabody Coal (the world's largest coal firm) with ExxonMobil (the biggest oil firm) in terms of the energy value of what they own. The price of Exxon's proven oil reserves are $3.16 per million British thermal units. The equivalent coal deposits at Peabody are worth just 7 cents per million

BTU. That's barely more than 2% of the value of oil! Such an enormous discrepancy has spurred new technologies that allow us to substitute coal for oil and natural gas. But some coal-fuel processes are 60 years old and more. The Nazi war machine made use of synthetic fuel derived from coal. And before the advent of the North Sea fields in the mid-70s, we all used coal gas for domestic heating and cooking.

 

If oil prices remain above the critical threshold of $50 per barrel, there's even a good chance we will soon be flying in coal-powered airliners. Indeed, if you have flown from Johannesburg International Airport in the last seven years, your aircraft ran on a mixture of kerosene and liquidised, pulverised coal.

 

Coal-rich and oil-poor, South Africa became a pioneer of this work during the apartheid era. Sanctions blocked imports of oil, but it required transport fuel at any cost. Now Sasol, the South African chemical firm that leads the world in coal-oil production, is to offer a new version of its aviation fuel, 100% derived from coal, for international approval later this year.

 

Soaring oil prices now mean the rest of the world is getting interested, too. The US Air Force spends $4.5bn a year on jet fuel, and is already showing interest. Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, recognising that many USAF scenarios involve bombing its own traditional oil suppliers in the Middle East, has ordered his forces to explore alternative fuels that don't require foreign oil. In September the USAF will conduct its first test flight with a synthetic fuel derived from natural gas, using technology similar to coal-to-oil.

 

Coal markets are fragmented by quality and locality. But it is clear that global coal prices have been rising for years. Since 1997, steam coal used for power generation has risen by 30% to $35 a tonne in the US. Over the same period, however, oil and natural gas prices have quadrupled. So coal is now increasingly competitive for electricity generation.

 

Growth in demand has had knock-on effects in hitherto declining industries too, stoking a resurgence in railway freight, shipping and ports. This is not likely to prove a flash in the pan. Coal prices are expected to double by 2020.

 

Outside Britain, demand for coal is growing fast. Every two years, according to the International Energy Agency, China is adding more power generation capacity than France has in total. About 70% is coal fired. China's steel boom is also being powered by high quality coking coal, though much of this comes from abroad.

 

Britain's coal industry, however, may play Cinderella during this party. Although we have 220 million tonnes of proven coal reserves, enough to last many decades, the main issue is getting at it.

 

Open cast digging, the method of choice in the vast spaces of Australia, Canada and much of the US is an impossibility in the UK. On planning grounds alone, deep-mined coal is hamstrung, too. But it also suffers from decades of neglect and a lack of miners. With few exceptions, it will remain easier and cheaper for UK power stations to import foreign open-cast coal than for us to reopen flooded and abandoned mines.

 

One of those exceptions is Richard Budge, the mining entrepreneur once known as "King Coal". He plans to reopen the Hatfield Colliery in South Yorkshire next May. Budge is the former head of RJB Mining, now known as UK Coal. It took over the rump of the British coal industry after privatisation in 1994.

 

Oil prices don't have to remain in the $70-$80 band for coal to have a future. With its new clean image and increasing adaptability, coal is going to muscle in so long as oil prices remain above $50. With no geopolitical risk, and increasingly attractive economics, there is huge potential in coal.

 

 

Regards, Nick Louth for The Daily Reckoning

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(From Stockhouse, an interesting comment...

about why Oil, Gas , and Coal stocks are under such pressure.

We saw it in May also... for Gold and Gold shares):

 

SUBJECT: Massive hedge-fund debacle the culprit imho Posted By: BOOMTIME

Post Time: 9/20/2006 18:47

 

Trust me,those losers should be out-lawed.....period......they over-shot the markets on the upside and now they are likely mostly responsible for massive losses in share prices of a good many commodity related companies like Fording,all imho,margin-calls left right and center to boot.......the company is also responsible for being over-exuberant with the distributions and then insider-selling shortly afterwards,of only omce insiders sold all their shares....lol......bums.... .........honey suckered indeed......

Imo,a distribution cut is almost in the cards i'll bet,hope not,frig,that'll hurt if that happens now at this low share price,make take the stock down even further possibly.....a good many natural gas income trusts have been dessimated also,,,,,not just old Fording here......later....bt

 

The debacle at Amaranth and problems at other hedge funds has spread across to other commodity markets,'' said Antoine Halff, an energy analyst with Fimat USA in New York. ``They've been liquidating positions because of margin calls. We're also seeing a lot of the index-based funds leave the market.''

 

@: http://www.stockhouse.com/bullboards/viewm...0&TableID=0

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Coal Mining - China

 

in 2003 China achieved a new record in coal production of 1,608 Mt a 15.4% increase from the 2002 total of 1,393 mt. Coal exports in 2003 amounted to 93 mt, 8.5% increase from 2002, imports reamined constant. Exports are mainly sent to Japan and Korea. China plans to form up to ten large mining enterprises, each capable of producing more than 50 Mt/y.

 

Four top producers currently are: (together: 14.8% 2003 production)

 

Shenhua Group................ : 65.94 mt of commodity coal

Yanzhou Coal Mining Corp

Datong Coal Corp

Shanxi Coke Group Co

 

Safety has been a major factor, with 6,000 fatalities in 2003

 

...more: http://knows.jongo.com/res/article/10339

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I wouldn't get too carried away about the coal economy. Consider that Nazi Germany tried to get around its lack of domestic oil by building coal liquifaction plants. They never had enough fuel, despite their efforts. The German war machine only used as much oil in a year as the world now guzzles in just one day - 85 million barrels, and they had oil fields in Romania and Austria to provide some of their supply. Now these were people who pioneered ballistic missiles, modern submarines, swept-wing jet fighters and all the rest, but they never cracked getting cheap fuel out of coal. That is a sobering fact.

 

The problem is trying to get journalists to understand the difference between oceans of cheap oil pouring out of the plains of East Texas, and Albert Speer struggling to get steel and specialist catalysts and trained workers to build coal liquifaction plant and all the infrastructure to serve the plants. It all takes time and money out of other things - and in a crisis it is time and money that decide whether you stay afloat or you sink. It would be going too far to say Hitler failed because he lacked oil, but it gave the Allies a massive advantage to have abundant cheap oil from the US and Russia. That advantage then got passed on to feed the amazing consumer boom of the post-war period, that we are still riding.

 

We are not in a crisis - yet. I am actually quite surprised at the gentleness of the slow-down, given that in fact global oil production has not increased for about two years. There still is plenty of capital swilling around that can go into building coal plant.

 

On another thread I pointed out how much it would cost to replace Drax with a modern coal plant. My guess was $10billion. That figure included pollution control but excluded carbon sequestration. To build a coal economy will mean a huge scale of investment during a period when energy prices are soaring (along with UK balance of payment deficit!). It's doable, but I cannot quite see how it could be done without a significant decline in (material) standard of living. The coal article does not make this clear.

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if coal is the only alternative, as the oil runs out, we will find a way.

technology, once invented, can be made cheaper. south africa has gone well

beyond nazi germany.

 

meantime, coal stocks have jumped nicely : http://www.coalprice.com/

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if coal is the only alternative, as the oil runs out, we will find a way.

technology, once invented, can be made cheaper. south africa has gone well

beyond nazi germany.

 

meantime, coal stocks have jumped nicely : http://www.coalprice.com/

Actually, I would have said the USA has done quite well. Read this:

 

www.caer.uky.edu/energeia/PDF/vol8-3.pdf

 

Much of it is quite technical, but it gives a concise, excellent account of how our situation today has developed. You can understand why Dan Yergin maintains "we've been here before". There was a lot of interest in liquefaction in the USA after WW2, as it was realised that US and Venezuelan oil would not supply the world for many years more. Then came the discoveries in the Middle East and the imperative relaxed. Likewise we discovered new oil after 1973. It must be said though that we are not discovering much new oil now.

 

It is clear that there has been long term interest in the issue in the US, under the radar of general awareness. Wise minds have thought decades ahead of the thoughtless herd and have been working on technology that will soon be vital. The article indicates the liquefaction becomes viable at about $40/barrel. Despite this there does not appear to be all that much interest in liquefaction. Perhaps in reality the overall costs n scaling are higher?

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Actually, I would have said the USA has done quite well. Read this:

 

www.caer.uky.edu/energeia/PDF/vol8-3.pdf

 

Much of it is quite technical, but it gives a concise, excellent account of how our situation today has developed. You can understand why Dan Yergin maintains "we've been here before". There was a lot of interest in liquefaction in the USA after WW2, as it was realised that US and Venezuelan oil would not supply the world for many years more. Then came the discoveries in the Middle East and the imperative relaxed. Likewise we discovered new oil after 1973. It must be said though that we are not discovering much new oil now.

 

It is clear that there has been long term interest in the issue in the US, under the radar of general awareness. Wise minds have thought decades ahead of the thoughtless herd and have been working on technology that will soon be vital. The article indicates the liquefaction becomes viable at about $40/barrel. Despite this there does not appear to be all that much interest in liquefaction. Perhaps in reality the overall costs n scaling are higher?

 

AFAIK Sasol (South Africa) and Rentech (USA) http://www.rentechinc.com/

 

are the leading companies using the Fischer-Tropsch (Coal into Diesel) process to produce Oil from Coal.

 

The South African Government announced a few months ago that Sasol's process was now capable of entirely powering commercial airline flights (as long as everybody keeps shovelling...) by producing 'pure' aviation fuel using this process.

 

whereas until recently, it had only been able to use it as a portion of the aviation fuel.

 

Pretty exciting stuff eh? (well relatively speaking).

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Wow. Look at that move in Energy stocks

 

XLE : 52.87 Change: +0.97 Percent Change: +1.87%

 

Coals stocks had a huge day

 

Massey (MEE) : 22.90 Change: +2.07 Open: Percent Change: +9.94%

 

 

Oil was down, so this may be an indication that investors think we will not see any

further falls in oil, and an energy rally is beginning

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An interesting view on coal from the Motley Fool.

 

I never though the day would come when Arthur Scargill may be proved right.

 

For those who may be too young to remember, Arthur Scargill was leader of the National Union of Miners in the seventies and early eighties. He is probably best remembered for fighting doggedly with the Thatcher Government to ensure that unprofitable British coal mines remained open. He argued that there is no such thing as uneconomic pits -- just pits that lack sufficient investment. He also contended that the closure of 20 unprofitable pits, which were owned by the National Coal Board, would result in the loss of 20,000 skilled jobs forever.

 

But that was then. Today, coal production has returned to favour with a vengeance as commodity prices climb on the back of soaring demand. And some experts, which include the former boss of UK Coal (LSE: UKC), Richard Budge, reckon that coal mining in Britain may stage a dramatic comeback. Coal may even challenge oil, gas, and biomass as a viable source of power generation.

 

http://www.fool.co.uk/news/comment/2006/c0...ioodftxt0010006

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(owned shell canada calls- bid came out today- big jump, so will sell them)

 

Shell money is going to go in... to Coal stocks:

 

ANR, WTN.t, CCJ.v

 

these have been laggards, but may move soon.

 

nice to make a 200% profit, and recycle at this stage,

with the coalers still cheap

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Not so long ago, Western industrialists and politicians dismissed coal as a viable fuel, rejecting its tendency to pollute cities and cause serious respiratory problems. The world has no shortage of coal and so its prices are stable, but burning it releases far more carbon into the atmosphere than using either oil or natural gas, thus accelerating the pace of global warming. Even so, the West is having second thoughts as energy prices increase – and companies in the US, UK and Germany have no qualms about selling coal-mining technology to companies in China and India. Already, about 70 percent of China’s energy needs are met with coal, and the US Energy Information Administration predicts coal consumption to double in Asia’s rapid expanding economies. Germans subsidize mines that are used as training sites for Chinese miners eager to learn the latest technology, including state-of-the-art emissions control, and politicians defend the subsidies as providing future energy security. Meanwhile, China is also borrowing another German idea – reserving massive amounts of coal and other natural resources to ensure long-term economic security. – YaleGlobal

 

Coal Makes a Comeback

Coal industry's days seemed numbered, especially in Western nations

 

Sebastian Ramspeck - Spiegel Online, 9 October 2006

 

Click here for the original article on :

http://www.spiegel.de/international/spiege...,439616,00.html

= =

 

 

2//

Currently, China uses more coal than the US, the European Union and Japan combined. China’s global-warming gases such as carbon dioxide will “probably exceed that for all industrialized countries over the next 25 years,” note journalists Keith Bradsher and David Barboza in “The New York Times.” These emissions have widespread impact, increasing global temperatures and releasing harmful sulfur and mercury particles linked to serious respiratory illness, child-development disorders and acid rain. Skies are bleak over Chinese cities and the particles drift to neighboring countries, as far away as the West Coast of the US, in measurable amounts. Though industrialized countries such as Japan offer loans, grants or technology to make China’s coal-burning technology more environmentally friendly, the nation relies on its own domestic equipment, cheaper and less energy efficient than foreign-made “green” alternatives. Cheaper equipment translates to cheaper energy for Chinese consumers, who continue to enjoy a wave of economic prosperity. Rural citizens pour into cities for employment at the coal plants, and the government faces pressure to respond to a growing demand for cheap energy to fuel modern amenities such as air conditioners, televisions, microwaves and refrigerators. Following the lead of their US counterparts, Chinese citizens demand the short-term benefits of cheap energy and dismiss long-term health and environmental dangers. – YaleGlobal

 

Pollution From Chinese Coal Casts a Global Shadow

 

Keith Bradsher, David Barboza / The New York Times, 16 June 2006

 

Click here for the original article on The New York Times website

 

@: http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/display.article?id=7590

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UK Coal is currently trading at 358.00p per share. In the last year the share price has ranged from 123.50p to 358.50p, but moonshot recently because of its property portfolio. Today it hit 358, it's losing money and makes me wonder where the upside is from here. This may be one for shorting in due course. I suspect the property portfolio was re-valued at the top end of expectations as that's what usually happens. Despite the case for coal, this one looks overdone.

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MARK SKOUSEN IS KEEN ON...

Coal Stocks:

Surging Worldwide Energy Demand To Fuel Coal Profits in 2007

 

Based on current production levels, oil reserves will last another 41 years, and gas reserves will last another 65 years. That is, of course, if supplies remain uninterrupted in the Middle East and Russia, which produce 68% of the world’s oil and 67% of the world’s gas.

 

Coal supplies, on the other hand, are a much different story…

 

Right now, coal reserves total more than a trillion tons worldwide, which could last almost 155 years. In the U.S., there are roughly 267 billion tons of recoverable coal – enough to fuel the country’s energy demands for 240 years!

 

It’s no surprise, then, that profits at the world’s leading coal producers are on fire…

To get this complete coal stocks report, simply sign up for the free Investment U e-Letter from best-selling financial author Dr. Mark Skousen. The report will arrive in your e-mail inbox in no more than 10 minutes... Absolutely FREE.

 

...@: http://www.investmentu.net/ppc/t4coal.cfm?kw=X300GC03

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(from KE-Report):

 

Sarah Nunnally of Material Profits reminds us in

Segment 3: http://www.kereport.com/audio/0217-03.mp3

that there's still money to be made with the right investments in coal and its technologies.

 

+ Transition to Coal-to-Liquids technology

+ May make the US more self-sufficient in transportation fuel (67-70% imported now)

+ US wasnt focussed on this problem because it long had access to cheap oil

+ creation is carbon intensive- but the ultimate fuel is clean

 

COAL producers may benefit from this trend

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http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanId=sa...E6E1A60C23D44E6

 

March 14, 2007

Future of 'Clean Coal' Power Tied to (Uncertain) Success of Carbon Capture and Storage

...........one 500-megawatt coal-fired power plant ...... produces three million tons of CO2 annually. Adding carbon capture technology to that plant sucks up 40 percent of the power it can produce and adds at least 2.7 cents to the retail price of that electricity..............

and concludes

.........This will require building a liquid CO2 infrastructure comparable to the national highway system as well as assessing which coal-burning technologies work best with which carbon capture technologies. ....... "How hard and how far can we push capacity in a safe, virtually riskless way?" Moniz asks. "There remains a scientific consensus on viability. Implementation is a different issue."

consensus? now where have i heard that before?

seems like a potty idea to me - it pushes the price of electicity up 50% in real terms , needs vast capex, there will likely be some serious technological problems en route and is probably completely unneccesary!

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http://www.planetark.com/dailynewsstory.cf...41903/story.htm

UK Power Stations in CO2 Capture "Beauty Pageant" UK: May 15, 2007

LONDON - British power companies are buffing up the credentials of at least four projects to capture and store underground their climate-changing CO2 emissions before competing for government funds.............. The UK government is expected to announce this month how it will choose which of at least four possible CCS projects it will fund, probably through direct subsidies or tax breaks...............

and you were moaning about browns tax increases? well, "you aint seen nothing yet"! (i suppose he could print some more money instaed)

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I’ve prepared a roundup of the five reports published in the first half of 2007 on the global coal situation. They are all broadly in agreement saying that there is likely to be less coal available than traditionally thought. This throws into doubt continued levels of coal exploitation but also prevents any significant future coal-to-liquids response to oil depletion.

 

What’s interesting is range of people saying this, the five reports come from four independent research teams, Germany’s Energy Watch Group, European Commission Joint Research Centre, California Institute of Technology and US National Academy of Sciences.

 

COAL – The Roundup

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that's great.

Some very useful reports there.

 

Are there any particular co's that you like now?

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MET COAL TO BENEFIT FROM STEEL DEMAND

Fitch: Coal outlook is stable, possible modest production growth

 

While the debate over global warming has stalled plans for new U.S. coal-fired plants, Fitch Ratings forecasts that the outlook for U.S. coal next year is stable.

Author: Dorothy Kosich

Posted: Thursday , 20 Dec 2007

http://www.mineweb.com/mineweb/view/minewe...6&sn=Detail

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