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The Livestock & Home produce thread - An Alternative investment

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Update:

 

Well my corn is reaching for the sky now. I'm just wondering whether if I'll get enough cobs to mature before the weather turns sharp?

 

Peppers still growing, will eat them starting at the end of the month.

 

I've had about 2 pound of beans off plant A (more growing).

 

I've trailed (with the help of the beans) them over the entire frame. So I have beans in various stages of development.

 

Will be getting beans til November or so from this one.

 

Had a couple of pound of potatoes last week from Sack A. Very tasty, especially as I thought they were shot.

 

Am amazed at the aggression of Strawberry Plants. They have colonised the entire left hand bottom corner of the garden and have sent out runners all over the shop, having rooted behind the shed and in many hard to reach places.

 

Still getting leafs for my salad from the big stone pot and I had chives and basil for a salad from the other big herb pot early this week.

 

Also have not bought any mint tea for the last 2 months as I have loads of it growing out of that big pot.

 

Will pull the first of my carrots this weekend and start tidying my corn bed.

 

Good Luck.

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Planting list for 2010

 

Runner Bean - Polestar - Good crop, ended up having about 9 plants in total

Pea - Hurst Green Shaft - Total failure, next year I'll try starting them off in some guttering in the grean house instead of sowing them directly in the ground.

Sweet Corn - Passion - Good crop, far better then last years fiasco, I'll end up with around 20 - 30 cobs off around 36 plants. Bad location due to sunlight but I'm happy with the result

Potato - Mais Bard (First Early)

Potato - King Edward (Main Crop) - Both sets of potatoes did better this year, bad location really (next to the corn) and had one or two "sunlight issues" will try using "bags" next year.

Beetroot - Bolthardy - Lots of it........ still got loads in the ground as well.

Tomato - Gardeners Delight (Small Tomatoes) - out door ones are only just starting to ripen. looks like it'll be a good yield.

Tomato - Tigerella (Fancied a change this year) - Much better then moneymaker, split a few of them as I overwatered on the odd occasion but no sign of disease. happy with the result.

 

Cucumber - Socrates - only 4 plants this year....... and still cropping - good yield

Courgette - Soleil

Courgette - Romanesco - both courgettes producing well, not as vigerous as last year nor as many, but still going.

Aubergine - Black Beauty - hmmmmmm.......... position in the greenhouse probably isn't the best. not picked one yet.

Squash - Butternut - still growing, looks like I'll get some nice ones, some are even interplanted in the corn ;)

Chillies/Peppers - Antohi Romanian (Sweet), Golden Bell (Sweet), Friggitello (Sweet), Jalapeno (Hot), Hungarian Hot Wax (Hot) Red Cherry (Hot) - good crop from the Hot ones, the sweet ones however .... well I got a few.

 

Broccoli - (Spouting) Early Purple - Established, still growing

Brussels Sprout - Evesham Special - Established, still growing

Cabbage - Hispi - had some problems with catterpilers, i'll end up with about half a dozen good ones.

Carrot - Amsterdam 3 (Sprint) - didn't bother planting these..... run out of space.

Parsnip - Gladiator - Established, still growing

 

Spinach - Perpetual Spinach - all good, still got some in the ground*

Rocket - Wild Grazia - all good, still got some in the ground*

Lettuce - Little Gem - all good, still got some in the ground*

 

* as a note, first time I've done multiple sowings. next year I hope to establish a constant flow through the summer.

 

Leek - Mussleburgh - Established, still growing

Onion - Stuttgarter Giant - didn't get many "big ones" bad growing location really, looking forward to doing these again next year, but still got some good ones. harvested early as everyone ended up nearly walking on them

 

Spring onion - ended up sowing some of these as well, should hopefully "overwinter"

 

 

Also have about 25no Strawberry plants from the runners of last years 3 or 4 strawberry plants. - I've now got approx 80 plants :)

 

Had some hasstle in the chicken coup with introducing some new hens, lost a few but currently getting around 3 -4 eggs off 5 birds.

 

Also started a herb garden as well, Sage, Chives, Parsley and mint. The parsley is going like the clappers.

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Planting list for 2010

 

WOW! So impressed.

 

Never planted winter cabbage before, am i too late or when do people try this out? Any guidance?

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WOW! So impressed.

 

Never planted winter cabbage before, am i too late or when do people try this out? Any guidance?

 

Thanks :)

 

I think it's a little late for the winter cabbage, but please appreciate that I'm far from an expert on Cabbages. (I lost a fair few this year)

 

I'd go for some "Spring" cabbages, but I'd get them in quick before the weather turns, really they needed to be sown last month and transplanted now, but we've had a late winter this year so I'm hoping for a late summer. The soil will still be warm at least for a short while so germination should occur. They'll be ready for harvest around March / April.

 

Currently thinking about sticking in some Japanese onion sets to "over winter" for next spring, and as soon as the greenhouse is cleared (Tomatoes, Chillies and Cucumbers) I'll be sticking in the lettuce etc.

 

Also tempted to try out a greenhouse heater as well, but it'll mean that I’ll have to repair a broken bit of glass that I found useful for letting in bees etc for pollination to keep the heat in.

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Also started a herb garden as well, Sage, Chives, Parsley and mint. The parsley is going like the clappers.

 

Be careful with some herbs as I've had a tricky time with some 'round at my parent's house.

 

 

Mint - Very evasive! Make sure you plant in a pot. Or, in a pot buried in the garden. It will just go berserk and take over otherwise.

 

Chives - As above but not as bad.

 

Rosemary - Keep it trimmed otherwise you'll quickly get woody stems. If you prune back into them it won't regrow.

 

Sage - As above really. I'm sure Sage plants only last a few years before they need to be replaced. Maybe it's just us?

 

 

My parents don't really have enough time, energy or inclination to keep on top of the garden as it should be. I try as much as I can to look after it for them. With more care and attention the herbs would probably do better.

 

We tried drying some herbs in the shed once, to use for cooking in the winter for example. Wasn't much of a success but it would would be worth a punt I reckon.

 

 

Good luck.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thanks VB

 

I'm glad you posted that, I already knew about the way some of these herbs spread and currently they are in troughs, ready to be put into raised beds...... and yes, I'd have overlooked keeping them in pots if you hadn't posted that - lol

 

you've probably saved me a little grief next spring :)

 

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Ive lost my runner beans, potatoes and beetroot to deer and wild boaar. Any suggestions?

 

Ask for them back?

 

Only joking. Can you surround the area with a stock proof hedge? Hawthorn or even Holly maybe?

 

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Ive lost my runner beans, potatoes and beetroot to deer and wild boaar. Any suggestions?

Get a gun.

 

And some free meals.

 

Good Luck.

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A fence to keep out wild boar needs to be very strong a determined large boar will get through standard cattle / sheep and deer fencing either by going through or under it. To stop boar digging under your fence bury it a foot under ground, snout wires will also help prevent boar going under your fence. Do you know what species of deer are raiding your garden? The height of the fence depends on what

species of deer you are trying to keep out.

 

Ive lost my runner beans, potatoes and beetroot to deer and wild boaar. Any suggestions?

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Ive lost my runner beans, potatoes and beetroot to deer and wild boaar. Any suggestions?

 

I've heard that a 'full' hedge of blackthorn and holly serves well to keep out unwanted intrusions. There are disadvantages as they do attract butterflies and thus may mean an increase in caterpillars but on the upside, it does create a great natural home for many hedgerow dwelling animals and supplies you with sloe's to make gin. Just be careful when cutting as the thorns are evil!

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Update:

 

I have left the majority of my carrots in the ground. I did pull a couple of pound out and they are whoppers. Taste great too.

 

I estimate I have about 20 pound of carrots still in the soil. I have covered the tops with a fresh batch of top soil, so they can keep warm and carry on growing.

 

That way, I may have a constant supply of carrots til xmas, if the frosts don't slay them.

 

My beans' leaves shrivellled the first real frsot we had about 2 weeks ago. Couple of nights of around freezing and the plant looks crippled. Still some beans on it and I'll have them off there this weekend and blanch+freeze the last couple of pound of beans.

 

The bottom draw of our freezer is full of frozen veg now.

 

Potatoes. I left some in the ground in the bed. The others in growbags are still in the soil. I figure I can have them out of there over the winter and they'll still be fresh and tasty.

 

Peppers are still going strong. When the frost came, they did start to look a bit sorry for themselves, even though they are in the warm corner against a heat-retaining wall. So I sorted out the coldframe, which is a glorified piece of opaque plastic shunk over a metal frame. Still growing as they face the rising sun.

 

Herbs. The fleshy rocket is now about a foot high and just wants to be ate. The American Cress has invaded the no man's land of the very large stone pot. Looking juicy too.

 

A surprise couple of tomatoes popped up from one of the bucket plantings. Result, approx 1/2 a pound of cheeky toms, tasty.

 

Still no beetroot. Whappen?

 

Sweetcorn still on plants. Semi-sheltered position. Rats got the lowest one and obviously approved as I found the discarded cob gnawed clean.

 

Neighbourhood tabby got adult rat and hunts everyday for the juvies. Little rat is living a charmed life. Is very clean though, but maybe dead soon.

 

I wonder how much longer I can leave the cobs on the plants? They are 'toasted-haired' at the ends and have been for a month or so.

 

Anybody know if they'll retain their juiceiness if left in situ for a while? Or will they dry out too much?

 

Next year I will definitely plant the corn much earlier, under cloches if I have to. Ideally I want the cobs maturing in waves from July onwards.

 

Strawberries have colonised any free space anywhere. They'll probably die off over winter. I wonder though I've they'll regenerate next year of their own accord. There's enough of them.

 

I'll probably get a combination of normal and alpine strawbs for next season. Apparently alpines don't produce any trails and are 'invisible' to birds etc, allegedly.

 

Good Luck.

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Blimey, looks like you've had a good growing season :)

 

 

Update:

 

Peppers are still going strong. When the frost came, they did start to look a bit sorry for themselves, even though they are in the warm corner against a heat-retaining wall. So I sorted out the coldframe, which is a glorified piece of opaque plastic shunk over a metal frame. Still growing as they face the rising sun.

 

I'm obviously doing something wrong here..... mine (with the exception of 1 single pot plant) all finished around a month ago. my aubergines where terrible, got a fair size but just wouldn't rippen.

 

 

Sweetcorn still on plants. Semi-sheltered position. Rats got the lowest one and obviously approved as I found the discarded cob gnawed clean.

 

Neighbourhood tabby got adult rat and hunts everyday for the juvies. Little rat is living a charmed life. Is very clean though, but maybe dead soon.

 

I wonder how much longer I can leave the cobs on the plants? They are 'toasted-haired' at the ends and have been for a month or so.

 

Anybody know if they'll retain their juiceiness if left in situ for a while? Or will they dry out too much?

 

Next year I will definitely plant the corn much earlier, under cloches if I have to. Ideally I want the cobs maturing in waves from July onwards.

 

I hope you don't mind me saying, I think you should have had these off a while ago, thing to do if you are not aware is as soon as the silks blacken, is to open up the cob and press your thubnail into the cob. if the liquid comes out a slight milkey colour then it's ready to be picked.

 

If you leave it on the cob........... it goes really hard. I think this is how farmers grow it for cattle feed, but please do quote me on that.

 

 

 

Strawberries have colonised any free space anywhere. They'll probably die off over winter. I wonder though I've they'll regenerate next year of their own accord. There's enough of them.

 

I'll probably get a combination of normal and alpine strawbs for next season. Apparently alpines don't produce any trails and are 'invisible' to birds etc, allegedly.

 

Good Luck.

 

I've stuck all my strawberries in the greenhouse for the winter, hopefully it'll give them a good start for next year, I'm currently up to about 80 plants all from 3 plants given to me 3 years back :)

 

All the best

 

SR

 

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Not much of a greenie myself. However am planning on getting the little one interested in home grown produce starting with next years growing season. Have only a smallish rear garden to play with and weeds and a large hedge belonging to next door to contend with. Not a great deal of natural light unless towards end of day on rear decking area.

 

Am thinking of

 

strawberry plant - as strawberries as previously mentioned are a high cost food

 

+ baby sweetcorn as these seem fairly hardy and can take care of themselves + good size for the little one to eat!

+ whatever will grow well in a growbag - tomatos maybe

 

 

+ has anyone here thought /heard of aquaponics - is apparently serious stuff for home self sufficiency ! see

 

http://www.greenenergyinvestors.com/index....mp;#entry190377

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Blimey, looks like you've had a good growing season :)

 

It's been kind to me yes. Especially with such a ltd amount of soil turned over.

 

I'm obviously doing something wrong here..... mine (with the exception of 1 single pot plant) all finished around a month ago. my aubergines where terrible, got a fair size but just wouldn't rippen.

 

The Peppers love their sunny warm corner. Bear in mind also that I got them as seedlings from the market so they had a headstart. Still they will taste great.

 

I hope you don't mind me saying, I think you should have had these off a while ago, thing to do if you are not aware is as soon as the silks blacken, is to open up the cob and press your thubnail into the cob. if the liquid comes out a slight milkey colour then it's ready to be picked.

 

If you leave it on the cob........... it goes really hard. I think this is how farmers grow it for cattle feed, but please do quote me on that.

 

Hey no problemo. I know I've been slack on tis one. Should of had them off there ages ago. Better feed them to my cattle then...moooooo. I'll try em out on my missis on the weekend. lol.

 

I've stuck all my strawberries in the greenhouse for the winter, hopefully it'll give them a good start for next year, I'm currently up to about 80 plants all from 3 plants given to me 3 years back :)

 

Och I have no greenhouse. No idea where to put my strawbs though. More knocking up of coldframe type tatt for me then.

 

Good Luck.

 

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+ whatever will grow well in a growbag - tomatos maybe

 

 

+ has anyone here thought /heard of aquaponics - is apparently serious stuff for home self sufficiency ! see

 

http://www.greenenergyinvestors.com/index....mp;#entry190377

 

Tomatoes is where I started and should be pretty easy, Get them off and running around February or March* just always remember to pick out the side shoots and put a stick next to it, normally 3 to a bag, I'd also try a cucumber as well, although I'll admit they're not as easy to germinate when compared to the tomatoes. And of course, a feed every couple of weeks and a sunny sheltered position on a patio and I'd have thought you'd not have to many problems.

 

 

*(judging the season is always a personal call, this year I waited until early April due to the frosts)

 

When planting out, give the bag a good filling up with water, then when the plants are in just keep the growbag moist, nothing more nothing less. A common mistake is to over water, then under water. if you do this you'll end up with blossom end rot.

 

 

all the best.

 

 

Och I have no greenhouse. No idea where to put my strawbs though. More knocking up of coldframe type tatt for me then.

 

Good Luck.

 

 

 

I'd also put your Strawberrys in a sunny sheltered position right now, I would think they'll be fine outside. but obviously a cold frame is always going to be benifical.

 

Good luck with the corn :)

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I'd also put your Strawberrys in a sunny sheltered position right now, I would think they'll be fine outside. but obviously a cold frame is always going to be benifical.

 

Good luck with the corn :)

 

Hey my strawberries still seem okay. They are sheltered by a wall at the moment.

 

I knocked up a temporary coldframe, that I anchored well. Was going to put the strawberries under it.

 

Unfortunately today it got ripped out the ground, by what I can only assume was a very strong gust of wind.

 

And ended up in my neighbour's garden. Sorry neighbour.

 

Meanwhile, some corn news. As I realised, I left them far too long.

 

Anyway, I ate four of the cobs. 3 were pretty good. 1 was very starchy and a bit yuck. The birds got that after a couple of bites.

 

Tomorrow I'll eat another 4 and see what's what.

 

I also cooked half of my peppers, which are belaboured underneath a drafty and tatty cold frame covering.

 

Best eat them before they rot.

 

Well tasty!

 

Will grill and peel some more tomorrow and make a pepper salad.

 

I still have about 50 lbs of carrots, very densely packed in the bed.

 

Have put another inch or so of top soil over their heads to keep any nippy weather off.

 

And I still have my store of potatoes, still in their permaculture bags, until needed.

 

Got no space left in the freezer. It's full of beans.

 

Will have to have a clear up over the weekend and consult my allotment book for some seasonal advice and see what I can plant.

 

Good Luck.

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Done it :) Got a boar and some fox.

 

Excellent. Boar's pretty tasty if cooked right.

 

Wouldn't try the fox though.

 

Good Luck.

 

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Bought a load of top hat blueberry bushes earlier in the year, specifically as this small veriety can be planted in containers and moved around, yet apparently produce quite a fair yield from their 2nd year onwards.

 

STUPID QUESTION: Is it necessary to move these indoors for winter, as they are starting to shed their leaves and i'm not sure whether this is normal or the result of frost creeping in? Or can they remain outside?

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STUPID QUESTION: Is it necessary to move these indoors for winter, as they are starting to shed their leaves and i'm not sure whether this is normal or the result of frost creeping in? Or can they remain outside?

 

I'd get them in to somewhere a tad warmer.

 

Shed or something, just to stop the excess of winter.

 

Else they might kark it.

 

Good Luck.

 

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I'd get them in to somewhere a tad warmer.

 

Shed or something, just to stop the excess of winter.

 

Else they might kark it.

 

Good Luck.

 

Thanks, think my gut instinct was telling me that. Shed it is then.

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