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ziknik

Beaten down dividend paying shares that could be good for the long term

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But there's plenty of people who don't even look at their portfolio's until it's time to retire and find they've got a lot less than they expected.

 

Buy & hold isn't an easy option IMO, I review my holdings regularly and I will sell if I feel the need to.

Provided your portfolio is diversified and spitting out a decent income what does it matter what the underlying capital value is?

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You do. That's called an Index Tracker.

All the funds I own seem to charge a huge annual fee, I get negative dividends on all of them.

 

Provided your portfolio is diversified and spitting out a decent income what does it matter what the underlying capital value is?

You've got more options if you've got a large lump sum.

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All the funds I own seem to charge a huge annual fee, I get negative dividends on all of them.

Can't say I bother with funds. Used to have a Legal and General index tracking ISA. Cashed it in and put the money into stocks that I chose.

You've got more options if you've got a large lump sum.

I suppose a lot of it depends on your outlook on investing.

 

Me? I do not believe the stock market is efficient or rational. Things get blown out of proportion and people take their bat and ball home and prices fall ridiculously. They normally rise again. Or not.

 

Like I said, provided you have good diversification across a range of stocks it doesn't really matter what the capital behind them is.

That only matters if you're looking to sell.

 

My high-yield stocks are not for sale. That includes the 0% yielding BP and Lloyds. They'll recover in the end and they'll spit out decent dividends. Just a question of waiting.

In the meantime the other stocks I have are giving me a good yield.

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Dividend on Wednesday.

 

Including the rights issue, which averaged me down, I am down 7%. A month or so ago I think I was down about 15%. I don't really check to be honest with you. I've got a folder full of share certificates in the filing cabinet upstairs out of the way.

Why share certificates instead of electronic? So I'm not tempted to sell on every bit of bad news.

 

The high yield strategy is about income, not capital values and tinkering usually results in your broker becoming richer and you becoming poorer.

I got my NG dividend :JumpingUp&DownLaughingSmiley:

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Can't say I bother with funds. Used to have a Legal and General index tracking ISA. Cashed it in and put the money into stocks that I chose.

I’ve put a lot of money in to funds, I bought them when I transferred my pension from the companies I’ve worked at in the past. It was a quick, easy way to get exposure to lots of shares. Overtime, I intend to sell the funds and buy individual shares.

 

I suppose a lot of it depends on your outlook on investing.

 

Me? I do not believe the stock market is efficient or rational. Things get blown out of proportion and people take their bat and ball home and prices fall ridiculously. They normally rise again. Or not.

 

Like I said, provided you have good diversification across a range of stocks it doesn't really matter what the capital behind them is.

That only matters if you're looking to sell.

As the law stands, I will have to sell my holdings and buy an annuity with all of my Protected Rights money. I don’t think there’s any other option for Protected Rights money at present so I am more interested in capital values than dividends with Protected Rights money.

 

All* of the shares I have mentioned of this thread are bought with non-Protected Rights money. These are the shares I will use for an income in my retirement (as the plan currently stands).

 

Virtually all of the money I am using in this thread has come from my employers (past and present). I’ve only put a few hundred pounds in myself.

 

* I bought some of my BP shares with protected rights money; I will offload these at some point in the future and chase after capital gains.

 

My high-yield stocks are not for sale. That includes the 0% yielding BP and Lloyds. They'll recover in the end and they'll spit out decent dividends. Just a question of waiting.

In the meantime the other stocks I have are giving me a good yield.

I’d be interested in seeing a list of all your holdings if you’d be kind enough to post them. TIA

 

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Maybe of Some interest here ?

 

Credit Suisse has come up with a list of relatively stable stocks that at least offer dividends yields that exceed those miniscule bond yields you're seeing. It won't be like investing in tech in the 1990s, but it could offer a bit more excitement. See Robert Powell's column on flight to safety.

 

In a research note Friday, Credit Suisse's U.S. equity strategist Douglas Cliggott looked at companies with a market capitalization exceeding $15 billion, firms that offer yields of 2.75% or greater, and a volatility beta that is 0.75 compared with the rest of the S&P 500.

 

"We believe the sharp decline in long-dated U.S. Treasury yields is an important event," Cliggott wrote.

 

/more: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/a-roster-...ider-2010-08-20

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I’ve put a lot of money in to funds, I bought them when I transferred my pension from the companies I’ve worked at in the past. It was a quick, easy way to get exposure to lots of shares. Overtime, I intend to sell the funds and buy individual shares.

 

 

As the law stands, I will have to sell my holdings and buy an annuity with all of my Protected Rights money. I don’t think there’s any other option for Protected Rights money at present so I am more interested in capital values than dividends with Protected Rights money.

 

All* of the shares I have mentioned of this thread are bought with non-Protected Rights money. These are the shares I will use for an income in my retirement (as the plan currently stands).

 

Virtually all of the money I am using in this thread has come from my employers (past and present). I’ve only put a few hundred pounds in myself.

 

* I bought some of my BP shares with protected rights money; I will offload these at some point in the future and chase after capital gains.

 

 

I’d be interested in seeing a list of all your holdings if you’d be kind enough to post them. TIA

You see, I think annuities are evil things. I'd rather have control.

List of stocks. No problem.

Just remember: This is not financial advice nor a statement saying any of these are a good buy. Do your own research.

Etc.

 

Aviva

BP

British American Tobacco

British Land

Catlin

Drax

HSBC

Land Securities

Lloyds Banking Group

McBride

National Grid

Royal Dutch Shell B

RSA Insurance

Sainsbury

Scottish and Southern Energy

Severn Trent

Unilever

United Utilities

Vodafone

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Maybe of Some interest here ?

 

Credit Suisse has come up with a list of relatively stable stocks that at least offer dividends yields that exceed those miniscule bond yields you're seeing. It won't be like investing in tech in the 1990s, but it could offer a bit more excitement. See Robert Powell's column on flight to safety.

 

In a research note Friday, Credit Suisse's U.S. equity strategist Douglas Cliggott looked at companies with a market capitalization exceeding $15 billion, firms that offer yields of 2.75% or greater, and a volatility beta that is 0.75 compared with the rest of the S&P 500.

 

"We believe the sharp decline in long-dated U.S. Treasury yields is an important event," Cliggott wrote.

 

/more: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/a-roster-...ider-2010-08-20

Very interesting for CS to say this.

Always good to read about dividends. A very under-rated property of shares IMO.

Thank you for that.

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I’ve put a lot of money in to funds, I bought them when I transferred my pension from the companies I’ve worked at in the past. It was a quick, easy way to get exposure to lots of shares. Overtime, I intend to sell the funds and buy individual shares.

 

 

As the law stands, I will have to sell my holdings and buy an annuity with all of my Protected Rights money. I don’t think there’s any other option for Protected Rights money at present so I am more interested in capital values than dividends with Protected Rights money.

 

All* of the shares I have mentioned of this thread are bought with non-Protected Rights money. These are the shares I will use for an income in my retirement (as the plan currently stands).

 

Virtually all of the money I am using in this thread has come from my employers (past and present). I’ve only put a few hundred pounds in myself.

 

* I bought some of my BP shares with protected rights money; I will offload these at some point in the future and chase after capital gains.

 

 

I’d be interested in seeing a list of all your holdings if you’d be kind enough to post them. TIA

Zik, you need to get a SIPP administrator like mine. They lobbed my PR money in with the non PR money and I can trade all manner of things including currencies and derivatives. It's treat the same as the other monies and if it's not they are going to have a real job in trying to figure out what's what :lol: I may be wrong but I don't think there is any restrictions or ring fencing of PR monies now and I think you can pass on your pension pot in your will with out purchasing an annuity.

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You see, I think annuities are evil things. I'd rather have control.

List of stocks. No problem.

Just remember: This is not financial advice nor a statement saying any of these are a good buy. Do your own research.

Etc.

...

I've seen GTG's comment below and I wonder if I am working to out-of-date laws (it wouldn't be the first time). I'll have to do a little more reading about annuities, I thought I had no choice with Protected Rights money.

 

I’ve got the following

BP

National Grid

Severn Trent

Vodafone

 

I’ve got these on my watch list

Royal Dutch Shell B

Scottish and Southern Energy

Unilever

 

I’m avoiding the following as I think better buying opportunities will come in a few years

Avoiding finance/insurance

Aviva

HSBC

Lloyds Banking Group

RSA Insurance

 

Avoiding property

Land Securities

British Land

 

 

The Others

Drax – The power station has expired it’s design life already so it can’t have too many years left before it requires MASSIVE investment / decommissioning / clean up.

British American Tobacco – I find tobacco a little immoral

Catlin – Don’t know anything about them

McBride – Don’t know anything about them

Sainsbury – I should have looked at his before I bought Morrison’s. I can’t remember why I didn’t

United Utilities – I might buy this later after I’ve loaded up on more Severn Trent shares.

 

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I've seen GTG's comment below and I wonder if I am working to out-of-date laws (it wouldn't be the first time). I'll have to do a little more reading about annuities, I thought I had no choice with Protected Rights money.

 

I’ve got the following

BP

National Grid

Severn Trent

Vodafone

 

I’ve got these on my watch list

Royal Dutch Shell B

Scottish and Southern Energy

Unilever

 

I’m avoiding the following as I think better buying opportunities will come in a few years

Avoiding finance/insurance

Aviva

HSBC

Lloyds Banking Group

RSA Insurance

 

I believe with dividends, the time to buy is always now.

Avoiding property

Land Securities

British Land

I see these as a hedge. I don't own a house. I want prices to fall.

If prices fall I can get a cheaper house. The fall in shareprice or cutting of dividend is naff all in that case.

If prices rise I "profit" in a higher shareprice and increased dividends.

The Others

Drax – The power station has expired it’s design life already so it can’t have too many years left before it requires MASSIVE investment / decommissioning / clean up.

Interesting. I reckon it'll be fine. The light will be going off if anything happens to Drax.

British American Tobacco – I find tobacco a little immoral

I suspect BAE systems and AstraZeneca/GlaxoSmithKline are good buys.

I won't buy either.

BAE makes bombs that kill people.

AZN/GSK test on animals - which I find immoral.

Morality is a personal thing. People can choose to smoke but Iraqi children can't choose to get bombed and animals can't choose to have wires shoved in their brains.

Catlin – Don’t know anything about them

Non-life insurance.

McBride – Don’t know anything about them
Manufacturer of supermarket own brand cleaning/personal products.

Sainsbury – I should have looked at his before I bought Morrison’s. I can’t remember why I didn’t

United Utilities – I might buy this later after I’ve loaded up on more Severn Trent shares.

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Interesting. I reckon it'll be fine. The light will be going off if anything happens to Drax.

...

Sounds like famous last words to me.

 

Scroll down the wiki page to see a list of dead powerstations http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_power...ions_in_England

 

...

I suspect BAE systems and AstraZeneca/GlaxoSmithKline are good buys.

I won't buy either.

BAE makes bombs that kill people.

AZN/GSK test on animals - which I find immoral.

Morality is a personal thing. People can choose to smoke but Iraqi children can't choose to get bombed and animals can't choose to have wires shoved in their brains.

...

That's a fair point

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Zik, you need to get a SIPP administrator like mine. They lobbed my PR money in with the non PR money and I can trade all manner of things including currencies and derivatives. It's treat the same as the other monies and if it's not they are going to have a real job in trying to figure out what's what :lol: I may be wrong but I don't think there is any restrictions or ring fencing of PR monies now and I think you can pass on your pension pot in your will with out purchasing an annuity.

It seems I am quoting out-of-date laws again. I don't have to buy an annuity with protected rights money. BUT I still have to make provisions for my wife.

 

http://www.jameshay.co.uk/DocumentView.aspx?DocumentID=275

http://www.scottishlife.co.uk/scotlife/Web...ed%20rights#891

 

This is soooooo confusing, the second link says RP cannot be held in a SIPP - it's clearly wrong.

 

My SIPP at H-L is split in to protected rights and non-protected rights so I can easily identify them.

My PP at Skandia shows the money lumped together but they send me a statement each year identifying the amounts of PR and non-PR

 

Where have you got your SIPP?

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It seems I am quoting out-of-date laws again. I don't have to buy an annuity with protected rights money. BUT I still have to make provisions for my wife.

 

http://www.jameshay.co.uk/DocumentView.aspx?DocumentID=275

http://www.scottishlife.co.uk/scotlife/Web...ed%20rights#891

 

This is soooooo confusing, the second link says RP cannot be held in a SIPP - it's clearly wrong.

 

My SIPP at H-L is split in to protected rights and non-protected rights so I can easily identify them.

My PP at Skandia shows the money lumped together but they send me a statement each year identifying the amounts of PR and non-PR

 

Where have you got your SIPP?

You've discovered why pensions are evil! Too many rules about when you can have your money, what you can do with it in the meantime and the tax.

And the best bit is all those rules can be changed at the whim of a hat!

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It seems I am quoting out-of-date laws again. I don't have to buy an annuity with protected rights money. BUT I still have to make provisions for my wife.

 

http://www.jameshay.co.uk/DocumentView.aspx?DocumentID=275

http://www.scottishlife.co.uk/scotlife/Web...ed%20rights#891

 

This is soooooo confusing, the second link says RP cannot be held in a SIPP - it's clearly wrong.

 

My SIPP at H-L is split in to protected rights and non-protected rights so I can easily identify them.

My PP at Skandia shows the money lumped together but they send me a statement each year identifying the amounts of PR and non-PR

 

Where have you got your SIPP?

EPML

 

If you can't find answers there try these:

 

http://www.pensionsadvisoryservice.org.uk/

 

http://www.moneymadeclear.org.uk/products/...nt_options.html

 

or just ring HL they'll put you straight.

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You've discovered why pensions are evil! Too many rules about when you can have your money, what you can do with it in the meantime and the tax.

And the best bit is all those rules can be changed at the whim of a hat!

It's evil, but it's also 'free' money I got from my employers. I've not put very much in myself.

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3 Dividend Stocks With Low PEG Ratios, High Put Option Yields

 

Our latest screen for dividend paying stocks with low next-year PEG and 5-year PEG ratios, competitive management ratios, and conservative debt levels, has turned up three new dividend stocks with high put options yields: Autoliv (ALV), GOL Linhas Aereas Inteligentes S.A. (GOL), and Illinois Tool Works (ITW). We’ve added ITW to the Industrials section of our High Dividend Stocks by Sectors tables this week.

 

Here are Management, Debt, and Profit Margin metrics for these 3 firms:

(Tables)

 

Here's one of them:

 

Illinois Tool Works (ITW): ... update

zzz1.gif

 

A multi-billion dollar firm with over 100 years of history, ITW designs and manufactures fasteners and components, equipment and consumable systems and a variety of specialty products and equipment for customers around the world. Several ITW brands are leaders in their markets.

 

ITW is well-positioned to grow its business in Asia. In countries such as China and India, the company has heavy exposure to infrastructure projects in its welding and construction units. In fact, ITW has already doubled the percentage of revenue from the Asia-Pacific region since the beginning of the century. In 2010's first quarter, ITW's business was up 37%.

 

ITW is forecasting third quarter 2010 diluted income per share from continuing operations to be in a range of $0.72 to $0.84. The 2010 third quarter forecast assumes a total revenue growth range of 9 percent, to 13 percent. For full-year 2010, the company is forecasting diluted income per share from continuing operations to be in a range of $2.82 to $3.08. The 2010 full-year forecast assumes a total revenue growth range of 11% to 13%.

 

Disclosure: Author is short GOL puts.

==

 

Other charts : ALV : GOL :

 

/more: http://seekingalpha.com/article/222761-3-d...t-option-yields

 

Note: Based on the charts, I wouldn't buy any of them right now

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I moved both diaries back to the "Private" section - per your request

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I had another look at UU.l SSE.l & RDSB.l today.

 

They're all looking tempting... but not quite tempting enough just yet.

 

I'm hoping for a golden buying opportunity before xmas.

 

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I had another look at UU.l SSE.l & RDSB.l today.

 

They're all looking tempting... but not quite tempting enough just yet.

 

I'm hoping for a golden buying opportunity before xmas.

Timing is for mugs.

I buy one share monthly. The idea being that over time it irons out the rises and falls.

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Neil Woodford ramping his AstraZeneca shares

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/persona...ssion-ride.html

 

Mr Woodford said there were many industries, including pharmaceuticals and tobacco, that were partly insulated from the downturn and would continue to be able to increase revenues, profits, cash and dividends. "Some of the most interesting opportunities are in companies where the prospects for dividend growth are the strongest," he said. "Take AstraZeneca: at a price-to-earnings ratio of just over eight times, it is trading around its historic low and a long way below the FTSE All Share's average of 15 times. The company is also yielding 4.7pc and is committed to growing its dividend. This is an example of a quality business where the negatives are fully priced into the stock."

 

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Z,

 

Any recent thoughts on Dividend paying shares?

 

This one, that I featured above:

 

3 Dividend Stocks With Low PEG Ratios, High Put Option Yields

 

Here's one of them:

 

Illinois Tool Works (ITW): ... update

zzz1.gif

 

A multi-billion dollar firm with over 100 years of history, ITW designs and manufactures fasteners and components, equipment and consumable systems and a variety of specialty products and equipment for customers around the world. Several ITW brands are leaders in their markets.

 

ITW is well-positioned to grow its business in Asia. In countries such as China and India, the company has heavy exposure to infrastructure projects in its welding and construction units. In fact, ITW has already doubled the percentage of revenue from the Asia-Pacific region since the beginning of the century. In 2010's first quarter, ITW's business was up 37%.

 

...has shown a nice bounce.

 

Two others, both oilies: Statoil/ STO and Total/TOT that I have mentioned elsewhere have also done well.

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