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consa

Ethanol : the renewable energy / Sugar & feedstocks

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LOOK CLOSELY at the detail of the action plans produced by Caribbean governments to transform their sugar industries. There you will find in every single case a proposal to turn over a part of cane production to green energy in the form of bio-ethanol, the seemingly alchemic process whereby organic matter can become fuel to power cars, trucks or turbines.

 

Ethanol offers the world an ecologically sounder way to address the ever-increasing price of energy. It also has particular appeal at a time of uncertainty about the political stability of key oil-producing states, a shortage of global oil refining capacity and increased demand as emerging powers such as China and India race to become developed.

 

http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/200.../business6.html

 

Global requirements for ethanol are growing by 11 per cent per annum. In 2000, the world market for ethanol was 7.4 billion gallons. By 2005, it was 13 billion gallons. In 2004, Brazil, the world's largest producer, produced four billion gallons of ethanol from cane and was able to meet some 37 per cent of the world's needs. In total it exported 634 million gallons, of which 112 million went to the United States (U.S.), which itself produced 3.4 billion gallons of ethanol from corn. Now, in response to demand, Brazil's ethanol producers are racing to increase sugar cane production in order to achieve by 2013 production levels of around nine billion gallons per annum, and are clearing a vast acreage of land for cane production.

 

Is ethanol the way forward? also the sugar cane production in South Africa I believe has been stepped up to produce ethanol.

 

Diversification is the key element and ethanol is easily obtainable, to what extent it is unclear at present but it will definately take the pressure off oil.

 

What will happen to the price of sugar?? ;)

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Good point.

I will later add a section on Trading Energy Futures, and will remember to include Sugar

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SA's ethanol economy

 

The Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) and the Energy Development Corporation, a division of the Central Energy Fund, said yesterday that they would assess production of ethanol as a blend stock into fuel in South Africa.

 

According to the IDC, South Africa’s increasing demand for petrol is stretching the local refineries’ supply capacity.

 

This, together with the increasing oil price, makes it imperative that South Africa start looking at alternative fuels.

 

Agricultural capacity could be used to produce crops suitable for converting into ethanol.

 

The IDC has set aside R1,3bn for this plan, which could result in a series of projects in KwaZulu-Natal, Free State, Northern Cape and Mpumalanga aimed at producing about 1,1bn litres of alcohol a year. This represents roughly 10% of the country’s petrol consumption.

 

http://www.moneyweb.co.za/shares/industrials/975915.htm

 

I found it, it was on my board ;)

 

PS: Pls change this thread title to "Ethanol the renewable energy" or "Ethanol fuel" or something similar just so as to keep it on topic thnx

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Morrisons Opens The UK’s First BioEthanol E85 Fuel Pump

 

Morrisons supermarket will today open the UK’s first BioEthanol E85 filling pump, tying in with the first deliveries of the Saab 9-5 BioPower flex-fuel car. The fuel will be branded as Harvest BioEthanol E85, with the environmentally-friendly pumps featuring a new butterfly logo and a blue filling hose.

 

Morrisons, which is the UK’s fourth largest supermarket chain (with 274 petrol forecourts across the UK), will locate the UK’s first BioEthanol E85 pump on the forecourt of its Albion Way, Norwich site to be immediately followed by supplies of Harvest BioEthanol E85 at another four of its sites in the East of England – those of East Dereham, Lowestoft, Diss and Ipswich - plus at five sites in Somerset, in the South West of England. Furthermore, Morrisons has already earmarked several other sites across the UK, where Harvest BioEthanol E85 could soon be sold, according to consumer demand for it.

 

http://www.carpages.co.uk/saab/saab-95-15-03-06.asp

 

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Ethanol plants are in demand across world

 

GRANITE FALLS — The telephones at the headquarters for Fagen Inc. in Granite Falls ring with calls from all over the country and increasingly, from overseas.

 

Ron Fagen, president and founder of one of America’s leading construction and design companies for ethanol plants, said he is receiving an increasing number of inquiries from overseas countries interested in building ethanol plants of their own.

 

Australia, England, Denmark, Switzerland, China and Russia are among the countries where the calls have come.

 

http://www.wctrib.com/articles/index.cfm?id=5831

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Morrisons Opens The UK’s First BioEthanol E85 Fuel Pump

Bet they didnt drop the petrol price by 15% though. Fuckers profiting hugely on this.

 

The price of sugar will rocket soon.

We have had a jump in Hard commodfities now its the turn of soft commodoties.

 

Where to profit from sugar? Buy a field?

Nope - the route into this (as far as I can see) is in biotech companies who are developing processes to extract ethanol from plant waste not the full plant. I've posted the links somewhere else on here.....if youre interested.

 

(The calories have to go somewhere - if they go into fuel, they dont go into food and vice versa. You might get richer, but things will become a lot more expensive too.)

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"PS: Pls change this thread title to "Ethanol the renewable energy" or "Ethanol fuel" or something similar just so as to keep it on topic thnx "

 

Consa,

I think you can do that yourself- thru the "edit" function.

 

Good idea to keep the thread

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"PS: Pls change this thread title to "Ethanol the renewable energy" or "Ethanol fuel" or something similar just so as to keep it on topic thnx "

 

Consa,

I think you can do that yourself- thru the "edit" function.

 

Good idea to keep the thread

 

No, you must have the board setting switched off <_<

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i think everything is in demand, im a bit dubious about the brazillian ethanol production becuase to achieve it there cutting into the rainforests, this is hardly as ecologically sound as being made out by the end product.The thing about renewables is its a diffrent case study for everyone, ie we cant grow sugar cane so are we gonna switch from importing oil to importing ethanol?, either way its an import.However methane produced from rotted vegetable waste has huge potential in the uk.

 

food production factories would probably pay you to take this off there hands

 

 

but our main assets are wave and wind, so surely this has to be the main way forward

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IT IS WORKING / In Brazil

......................

 

Brazil: Energy Independence Through Ethanol

(This analysis appeared on Joe-Duarte.com on January 13, 2006.)

 

Brazil is on the verge of energy independence, developing a model based on ethanol. Washington should have a look.

 

According to the Wall Street Journal: "After nearly three decades of work, Brazil has succeeded where much of the industrialized world has failed: It has developed a cost-effective alternative to gasoline. Along with new offshore oil discoveries, that's a big reason Brazil expects to become energy independent this year."

 

Indeed, Brazil is going way against the grain, using sugar cane as its source for the ethanol, which "now accounts for as much as 20% of Brazil's transport fuel market. The country's use of gasoline has actually declined since the late 1970s. The use of alternative fuels in the rest of the world is a scant 1%."

 

To be sure, there are some drawbacks, such as the fact that gasoline gets better gas mileage, and according to the Journal: "countries wanting to follow Brazil's example may be leery about following its methods. Military and civilian leaders laid the groundwork by mandating ethanol use and dictating production levels."

 

In fact, Brazil did some things to reach this point that are politically unpalatable for most countries. "Military and civilian leaders laid the groundwork by mandating ethanol use and dictating production levels. They bankrolled technology projects costing billions of dollars, despite criticism they were wasting money. Brazil ended most government support for its sugar industry in the late 1990s, forcing sugar producers to become more efficient and helping lower the cost of ethanol's raw material. That's something Western countries are loath to do, preferring to support domestic farmers."

 

barbara_crystal.thumb.jpg . photo_ethanol_veh.jpg

 

Another part of the successful program is the use of "flexible fuel cars," which can use either gasoline or ethanol.

 

This part of the system has created a built in hedge into the system as "buyers no longer have to worry about fluctuating prices for either fuel because flex-fuel cars allow them to hedge their bets at the pump. Seven out of every 10 new cars sold in Brazil are flex-fuel," which can use gasoline, ethanol, or a mixture of both fuels.

 

System Attracting Interest

 

The Brazilian model is attracting attention, as China and India "have sent a parade of top officials to see Brazil's program. India, the world's second-biggest sugar producer behind Brazil, mandated in 2003 that nine of its states add a 5% ethanol mixture to gas. The Brazilian unit of Germany's Volkswagen AG, the first car maker to introduce a flex-fuel model in Brazil, has received 38 delegations from more than a dozen countries in the past year alone, VW officials say."

 

@: http://www.financialsense.com/editorials/d.../2006/0131.html

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SWITCH CORN may be the answer ??

==========

 

330 gallons / per acre of corn

630 gallons / per acre of sugar, as Brasil does it

 

Great hope for switch corn, but not proven yet

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I think you mean "Switch grass" - a potential Energy source

 

switchgrass.jpg

 

Growing costs fall after an expensive first year

 

image004.gif

 

"We have learned that with good establishment practices and reasonably good weather, yields of 2.5 to 4.5 ton/acre are achievable by the second year of the crop, incurring non-land costs for as little as $30 to $40/ton. Cumulative production cost per ton under these good management conditions may continue to fall to levels of $20-$30/ton. Land costs may be as little as $10/ton for non-tillable land or as much as $30/ton on marginal row-crop land.

 

We believe that total production costs of $30/ton for switchgrass biomass will be achievable by Great Plains producers with good establishment techniques on land that is of marginal value for row-crops. As we learn more about cost-effective establishment practices, many producers will be able to achieve this level of production cost efficiency. For biomass energy markets, transportation costs from farm to processing plants are likely to add another $10/ton for the average producer. The potential for switchgrass as a competitive alternative for Midwest farmers thus depends on these factors and the success of the experimental technologies being developed for biomass-to-energy conversion"

 

@: http://www.ag.ndsu.nodak.edu/streeter/2003...Switchgrass.htm

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i think everything is in demand, im a bit dubious about the brazillian ethanol production becuase to achieve it there cutting into the rainforests, this is hardly as ecologically sound as being made out by the end product.The thing about renewables is its a diffrent case study for everyone, ie we cant grow sugar cane so are we gonna switch from importing oil to importing ethanol?, either way its an import.However methane produced from rotted vegetable waste has huge potential in the uk.

 

Sugar beet?

 

Billy Shears

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Buffett on ethanol, from the Berkshire Hathaway annual meeting.

 

Asked about the viability of ethanol as a fuel additive and as an

investment, Buffett said it was easier figuring out if more people were

going to drink Coca-Cola and eat more See's Candies. Plus, the fact that

ethanol is so hot right now is a deterrent to Berkshire getting involved.

 

Munger opined that since it takes more energy to produce ethanol than

ethanol itself delivers, he didn't think it was a good idea. He also

rolled out his oft-used concept of three buckets. "At Berkshire we have

three buckets," he said, "Yes, no and too hard."

 

Ethanol goes in the "too hard" bucket. This is a great concept that I use

regularly in investing. You don't have to investigate everything, or have

an opinion on everything. Some investment ideas are just too hard, too

difficult, too complex to forge a good, safe investment opinion. On these

difficult questions, the investor always has the ultimate safeguard: He

can just walk away.

 

Chris Mayer

for The Daily Reckoning

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