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what about a stove to cook all this hoarded food on?

Are people thinking the utilities will be cut off/rationed/spiral in price?

 

I also live in a gardenless rented flat but think I'll be ok for a number of months.

 

For cooking (esp boiling water) I have 1 propane BBQ and 2 full 9kg tanks. I might look at getting a single burner ring for the tanks but I think you need a regulator to reduce the pressure. The BBQ tends to heat the whole cooking plate rather than an area so it probably wouldn't be the most efficient.

After that, I am picking up a multifuel stove in the US on my way through there in the next few weeks. That and the 40 litres of fuel I have should keep me going for a number of months.

 

As for heat, since living in New Zealand I have learnt to 'harden up'. No insulation, no central heating makes the Kiwi's a tough bunch who don't feel the cold. Their advice is always to 'put another jumper on' but over winter I tended to go for a sleeping bag instead! Still, summer is here so if tshtf in the next few weeks we should have time to prepare before the coldness comes back...

 

Steve probably has more of heating plan as he lives 'down south' (I'm a soft Northen Bstd :) )

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you can use tealight candles to reheat stuff in tins. Its pre cooked and only needs warming up. Cook it in the tin over the candle and it soon warms up.Keep stirring though or it will stick and burn.

 

The number 1 most important thing to remember when trying to cook things / boil water with limited power or fuel is to cover the tin / saucepan. It will half your boiling time (in fact, you might not be able to boil something without a lid). A lesson learnt the hard way on a mountain marathon in my youth. Using a little firelighter stove we used about 4 cubes to try to get some water to boil for our pasta choice (urgh) but failed. In the end, putting a spare bit of tin foil over the pan had us boiling water on half the burn of a firelighter.

 

 

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Steve probably has more of heating plan as he lives 'down south' (I'm a soft Northen Bstd :) )

 

Yes, I find it more than a little amusing that I used to be a "soft southern bar steward" and now you lot "up there" are :lol: :lol: :lol:

 

I disagree about Kiwis being tough though. I know plenty who think 21C is cold.

 

So do I now :blink: :blink:

 

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This is a very nice, very easy, very sensible recipe

 

Rice Pudding

 

Ingredients:

 

1. Ordinary long grain rice

 

2. Tin of Condensed Milk (sweetened or unsweetened)

 

Both ingredients store for a long time.

 

Cook the rice as normal.

Add the condensed milk.

 

Eat.

 

It is very nice, and as you can see, has all the requirements of part of a survival kit.

 

And it's better and cheaper than a tin of rice pudding.

 

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This is a very nice, very easy, very sensible recipe

 

Rice Pudding

 

Ingredients:

 

1. Ordinary long grain rice

 

2. Tin of Condensed Milk (sweetened or unsweetened)

 

Both ingredients store for a long time.

 

Cook the rice as normal.

Add the condensed milk.

 

Eat.

 

It is very nice, and as you can see, has all the requirements of part of a survival kit.

 

And it's better and cheaper than a tin of rice pudding.

 

But rice pudding is up there with Marmite on the list of things I hate. No survival for me then...

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But rice pudding is up there with Marmite on the list of things I hate. No survival for me then...

 

Mwaaahahahahahahaha

 

My rice and condensed milk is safe :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

 

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Heres something for Steve !

http://www.miningcompanyreport.com/mercena...14_Hoarding.pdf

 

Michael S. "Mickey" Fulp

 

Besides being a geologist as below he has also written a blog - see above from a US redneck survivalist point of view :ph34r:

 

Mickey has worked for junior explorers, major mining companies, private companies, and investors as a consulting economic geologist for the past 21 years, specializing in geological mapping and property evaluation. In addition to Mickey’s professional credentials and experience, he is high-altitude proficient and is bilingual in English and Spanish. From 2003 to 2006, Mickey made four outcrop ore discoveries in Peru, Nevada, Chile, and British Columbia.

 

Mickey is respected throughout the mining and exploration community for his ongoing work as an analyst for public and private companies, investment funds, newsletter and website writers, private investors, and brokers.

 

for general info see http://www.mercenarygeologist.com/

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Oh yeah, I’m not quite done with this lecture: You might also consider going Third World and developing

a taste for warm beer.

 

Do you really think you are guaranteed to roll off the recliner, saunter to the kitchen, and pull a cold one

out of your wife’s new $2000 energy efficient, smart refrigerator bought on credit with your max’ed-out

Visa card at 13.99%, run on an electrical current from a smog belching, coal burning power plant on the

Navajo Res 250 miles away, and sent thru a big copper wire to your brand new $270,000 three bedroom,

two and a half bath cracker box on a cul-de-sac in northwest Rio Rancho naturally landscaped in front

with twelve sagebrushes, two chollas, eighty-eight tumbleweeds, and one scrawny juniper bush that the

little lady is allergic to, and complete with party deck and sand dune for a backyard?

 

That subprime loan with the adjustable rate mortgage and the big balloon payment in year five is pretty

friggin’ scary, Dude. Little wonder you woke up at 3:30 this morning in a cold sweat with the seven-year

itch….and she had a headache.

 

I feel all inadequate again :blink:

Thanks, I'll check it out more later.

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Oh yeah, I’m not quite done with this lecture: You might also consider going Third World and developing

a taste for warm beer.

 

Steve's from the UK. He thinks that's how beer is supposed to be drunk!

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Steve's from the UK. He thinks that's how beer is supposed to be drunk!

 

Oh dear, an admission :unsure:

 

I don't like beer, or most wine :o

 

I wish I did !

 

I'm stuck with vodka, gin and very selected other drinks :rolleyes:

 

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If you are really serious about surviving a socio-economic disaster then a good addition to any emergency supply is to buy a copy of the SAS survival guide, read it and try some of it out. If the shops don't get re-stocked for more than a couple of months then the situation will become irreversable and we are going back to killing and picking our own food. In this case having some basic skills, a sharp knife and a means of starting fire will become more important than a stash of food and a bit of gold.

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I think that's great advice. I've got a list of books, and that is one of them.

 

Personally, the problem I find is that I am not 100% sure it will get that bad (at least here).

So I find it very difficult to spend time and money on things that may not be needed.

 

It would be great if someone would give a giant kick up the backside and get me motivated to do it.

All kicks welcome :D

 

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If you are really serious about surviving a socio-economic disaster then a good addition to any emergency supply is to buy a copy of the SAS survival guide, read it and try some of it out. If the shops don't get re-stocked for more than a couple of months then the situation will become irreversable and we are going back to killing and picking our own food. In this case having some basic skills, a sharp knife and a means of starting fire will become more important than a stash of food and a bit of gold.

 

With free compass: http://www.play.com/Books/Books/4-/5808043...al/Product.html

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Is this the best one ?

 

SAS Survival Guide: How to Survive Anywhere, on Land or at Sea

John 'Lofty' Wiseman

 

I wonder whether there is a New Zealand specific version which would be better for people down here.

 

Like how to catch and eat a Kiwi :D

 

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!!! Heathen!!!!

 

How to catch and eat a Possum, now there's a proper meal :rolleyes:

 

What's wrong with eating your fellow man ?

 

 

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

 

I knew you'd think I meant that sweet little bird :D :D

 

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What's wrong with eating your fellow man ?

 

 

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

 

I knew you'd think I meant that sweet little bird :D :D

 

Oh in that case, no worries :lol:

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!!! Heathen!!!!

 

How to catch and eat a Possum, now there's a proper meal :rolleyes:

 

Bugger that!

 

If it all goes Mad Max and I am in NZ I will go a hunting sheep :lol:

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How long can you store canned foods?

 

 

I remember David Fuller once saying that he stocked up on tinned foods back in the inflationary 1970s. Seems the tins explode after a while.

 

If possible, I store bottled goods rather than tins because there would be less contamination from the container.

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I remember David Fuller once saying that he stocked up on tinned foods back in the inflationary 1970s. Seems the tins explode after a while.

 

If possible, I store bottled goods rather than tins because there would be less contamination from the container.

The answer to the problem is simple, just rotate the cans. Each month use a number of the cans and buy some more.

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for completeness:

 

Believe it or not, all this fits into my 20litre daysack

and weighs 28 lb.

 

mini mag lite (AA batt, spare bulb in screw-cap)

Petzl headlamp (much brighter, kept as a backup light, spare bulb)

portable radio (AA batt)

mobile phone battery - charged, inside ziplock bag.

2x walkie-talkies (AAA batt)

Swiss Army Knife (lockable blade)

Whistle

2x survival bags

2x poncho

2x Freeze-dried meals - add hot water

cooking kit (small stove, lighters, knife&fork&spoon) -

(fits inside small mess tin about 6x4x1.5 inches)

10x sugary snack bars

water bottle with integrated carbon filter

water purification tabs (chlorine)

collapsible 2 litre water bottle (nalgene-very strong!)

 

8x AA lithium spare batteries

12X AAA lithium spare batteries

 

Bowie knife (has a compass,small chamber in handle for matches)

Post-it notes,

Bic biro,

permanent marker pen,

earplugs,

2x dust masks,

eye protection glasses,

 

Tools:

work gloves (thick, protects beyond wrists)

wire cutters

Stanley 10' mini hacksaw

Crowbar

Adjustable pliers - debatable if needed

automatic centre punch (would smash safety glass if needed)

Small hand axe - heavy - debatable if needed.

Hi-vis vest - very light, just yellow with stripes

Multi-function screwdriver

Duck tape

PVC tape

Stanley knife

Scissors

 

 

Climbing Karabiner (screwgate),

Climbing figure-of-8 (rapelling aid)

Long Climbing Sling,

100ft thin rope - still thick enough to support a human if doubled.

 

First Aid Kit:

Medical scissors,

Tweezers,

File,

Safety pins,

adhesive and non-adhesive large wound patches

plasters

surgical tape

steri-strips

superglue - yes!

vaseline

razor

sling

hypodermic needles

Fucidin antibiotic cream

alcohol rub

cloths

latex gloves

Amoxicillin antibiotics 500mg capsules

Trimethroprim 200mg

Compeed blister pack

Immodium

Soap

Bite cream

Neurofen

Antihistamines

 

oh, and in terms of weapons..........

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