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dont buy this stuff.

to split water and get oxygen and hydrogen you must spend energy. This energy will be obtained from your battery and generator, and for them to work you have to drive your car, so part of the energy the engine is producing will be spend on generating electricity to split water, that and at the end you will lose more fuel. Spliting water is a process of a very very high cost. You can't fool the physics, but you can fool the human brain, thats what those guys are selling.

I remember watching a film, where the sicentists were saying that if you dry gasoline (ie remove all the water from it) the fuel wont burn. This makes me think you could improve mileage just adding water to gasoline.

 

Sorry Ker, you misunderstand my joke. I didn't mean the water advert. I meant this one:

 

LiveFaceOnTheWeb_Rachel.jpg:lol: :lol:

 

I agree entirely on the science :D

 

It's funny you should mention honey.

I checked the use by dates of some pots in the supermarket last week. And bought what I thought were the cheapest large pots.

My wife later pointed out that I must have read the wrong price tag.

Instead of about NZ$8 per kg, they were NZ$30 :blink: :blink: :blink:

I had bought the most expensive Manuka honey in the store !!

 

And to add insult to injury, one pot had an expiry date of 2013, but the other one was 2011 :rolleyes:

 

So it does (according to the label) last quite a long time, but I'm not sure how long it really lasts.

 

I'll check out your links, thanks :D

 

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It's funny you should mention honey.

I checked the use by dates of some pots in the supermarket last week. And bought what I thought were the cheapest large pots.

 

My wife later pointed out that I must have read the wrong price tag.

Instead of about NZ$8 per kg, they were NZ$30 :blink: :blink: :blink:

I had bought the most expensive Manuka honey in the store !!

 

Least you'll be able to get rid of most infections, rashes and skin problems with Manuka honey, that stuff is awesome and tastes really good too.

 

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(Do people really believe this stuff??):

 

THE SURVIVAL LIST

 

2000 WATER PROOF MATCHES

5000 BULETS

2 HAND GUNS 2 HUNTING GUNS 2ASSUALT RIFLES

25 KNIFES

500 GALLONS OF WATER

1000 SPAN CANS

1000 POUNDS OF DYHATRATED FOOD

1000 POUNDS OF POWDER MILK

500 POUNDS OF RICE

500 POUNDS OF BEANS

100,000 IN COINS GOLD PLATED,QUATERS ECT.

20 TOOTH BRUSHES

 

/see:

Survive and Thrive the systemic collapse, part 1

 

- the future?

Robin Williams gives tour of survivalist camp, The Survivors

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The treatment that's the bee's knees

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-...bees-knees.html

 

Medicine may be increasingly high-tech, but the latest wonder treatment which is being offered to patients is - honey.

 

Last week, it was announced that bandages soaked in manuka honey are to be given to mouth cancer patients at the Christie Hospital in Manchester to reduce their chances of contracting the MRSA superbug and to lessen wound inflammation following surgery.

 

This is just the latest study investigating this particular type of honey's healing powers.

 

It is used routinely at the Manchester Royal Infirmary for dressing wounds, and other research has found it can fight gum disease, ease digestive problems and soothe sore throats.

 

All honey contains hydrogen peroxide, a substance once used as a wound disinfectant in hospitals - it comes from an enzyme that bees add to nectar.

 

It also contains the enzyme glucose oxidase, which boosts its anti-bacterial properties.

 

This was recognised by the ancient Egyptians and Greeks, who used honey to help heal burns and sores.

 

But manuka honey - made by bees that collect pollen from the manuka bush (Leptospermum scoparium), which grows wild in New Zealand - has other, yet to be identified, ingredients which appear to have health benefits.

 

Professor Peter Molan, director of the honey research centre at the University of Waikato, New Zealand, has called these 'unique manuka factors' (UMFs) and uses this to classify its various strengths.

 

For example, a UMF5 product is thought to be equivalent to a 5 per cent solution of a standard antiseptic; a UMF20, the highest strain, is equal to a 20 per cent solution of antiseptic.

 

The honey costs up to £12 a jar, and some doctors recommend one teaspoonful before meals for general health and digestive problems or it can be applied neat to the skin for rashes and wounds.

 

Here is a guide to manuka honey's other benefits:

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(Do people really believe this stuff??):

I do. I never cared about any crisis in my life even when I went bankrupt in the 2003. But when I saw the peak oil stuff, it scared me a lot. You can survive a currency crisis, because probably you could move to another country where there is no crisis, but peak oil is a worldwide problem, there is no escape from it. People will go crazy, specially in the USA. I am also waiting for massive panic, which will come at some point.

Last saturday I went to buy some oats for my reserves, and it was up to $1.40 USD/kg. A month ago I was buying it at $1.00. Thats 40%! Now I am not watching these videos anymore, I am getting ready for it, buying stuff, saving more, etc.... I think with food, we are at similar moment as when gold was around 300 USD/oz.

 

As Jim Puplava says, "Say HELLO to Peak Oil"!

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(Do people really believe this stuff??):

 

THE SURVIVAL LIST

 

2000 WATER PROOF MATCHES

5000 BULETS

2 HAND GUNS 2 HUNTING GUNS 2ASSUALT RIFLES

25 KNIFES

500 GALLONS OF WATER

1000 SPAN CANS

1000 POUNDS OF DYHATRATED FOOD

1000 POUNDS OF POWDER MILK

500 POUNDS OF RICE

500 POUNDS OF BEANS

100,000 IN COINS GOLD PLATED,QUATERS ECT.

20 TOOTH BRUSHES

 

/see:

Survive and Thrive the systemic collapse, part 1

 

- the future?

Robin Williams gives tour of survivalist camp, The Survivors

 

I've just watched Part 1 & 2.

It's so difficult to know what to think.

I've seen mass 'panic' before when everyone thought we were about to be nuked.

He's certainly at one extreme, but whether it's an unfounded view, I really don't know.

He certainly makes our preparations look pathetic.

 

I wonder what would happen if this became a more mainstream view.

A large number of people suddenly stocking up with a years worth of food would certainly affect the food supply.

 

I'm slightly worried about over-reacting, but I guess that's less dangerous than under-reacting.

Better to be prepared for something that doesn't happen than........

 

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Global food supply is a growing problem

Last Updated: 12:32am BST 09/06/2008

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/main.jhtm...ccration108.xml

 

Retailers and politicians are seeking ways to keep the global food crisis from hitting the UK, writes James Hall

 

Food riots. Scores of panicked people protesting, burning effigies and chanting. Shops being ransacked, supplies running out as soon as they come in, and stricken communities stockpiling rice, bread and water for fear of going without. These have happened in Haiti and Egypt in recent months as the price of scarce food has soared.

 

But what if they happened on the streets of Bromley? Or Newcastle? Or Bath? As bizarre as this might seem, the prospect of UK food shortages has started to be taken seriously by food manufacturers and retailers.

.....

There are four trends driving global food scarcity: global population growth (it is expected to grow from 6.7bn to 9bn by 2042), the increasing use of crops for fuel rather than food, the Westernisation of diets in the Far East, and a diminishing bank of farming land due to urbanisation and climate change. Market speculation is also mooted as a factor.

.....

Earlier this month UK supermarkets including Netto and WM Morrison were forced to ration sales of rice in response to supply problems and price rises.

 

In 10 days' time senior directors of Carrefour, Waitrose, Coca-Cola and Danone will talk at the World Food Business Summit in Munich, organised by the CIES, a trade body that represents 400 food retailers and manufacturers in 150 countries. The conference will address the "complex new realities" facing food retailers and producers.

 

 

and from another post:

 

There is lots of interest here for those interested in this sort of stuff:

http://bean-sprouts.blogspot.com/2006/10/l...line-store.html

Look under "Categories" on the right.

 

And an online store: http://www.lehmans.com/index.jsp

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Marmite:

Marmite.jpg

 

No wonder it's by Sanatorium, that's where you'd need to be to eat it...

 

Anyway, I would recommend against cola and salted peanuts. Both will dehydrate you and if there is a lack of clean water, that's the last thing you need.

 

I also have some pre-mac water purifying pumps as well as the purification tablets. Bare in mind that if you do run out of water, there is potentially some in the hot water tank, feeder tank in the loft, toilet cistern and (urgh) bowl. Start collecting rainwater too. All of this is drinkable if you add a few frops of bleach and leave for 30 minutes. Ideally you would boil it (note keep it on the boil for 5 minutes, don't just get it boiling).

So add bleach to the list.

Also tarpaulins and rope in case you need a shelter (i.e. house falls down and you are going to be outside for the night). Bin bags are also essential as if the water stops being pumped, then so does your sewage. The last thing you want is to be wasting potential drinking water 'flushing' the toilet. Solid waste in the bag and bury it. Oh an unlike an orienteering event I went to in the Czech republic, don't use see through bags!!

Actually, clear bags would be dual use as they can become solar stills in the event of a lack of water but living by the sea!

 

Also bare in mind that hospitals will be overwhelmed in an emergency so any medicines you need (insulin for example) make sure you have a supply of. Also, you may get ill during the disaster (I would imagine that post disaster illness is a significant cause of the total death toll). Get a few boxes of broad spectrum antibiotics from the local pharmacy. I think I just asked my doctor to prescribe some for emergency use and he was happy to do so. I also got some Tamiflu at the time too (but that is personal preference).

 

Wilderness medicine books are good too.

 

I also (note to self - starting to sound like a survivalist here, best make this the last one...) have a copy of the British National Formulary off ebay. It has all the names and general uses of prescription drugs sold in the UK. Just in case I am ever desparate enough to have to self prescribe (and lets face it, we are moving towards Mad Max now!)

Interesting bedtime read though!

 

Somewhere I have a list of the absolute minima you need to survive (food wise). It's along the lines of bag of wheat, salt, oats etc. I'll see if I can find it (out of interest).

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The peanuts I can understand (but you need some 'luxuries' when all else has gone to pot), but the cola was recommended by a Doc on several occasions when we suffered from food poisoning and couldn't eat. He said it contained everything you need to keep going ?

Likewise lemonade (full of sugar) for anyone pregnant, as when flattened it's good for when in labour !

 

We're starting to sound like survivalist nuts :blink:

 

And one last thing. "Skippy" :lol:

 

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And one last thing. "Skippy" :lol:

 

The bush kangaroo?

 

Intersting about the coke. You learn something new every day. Maybe you should also pack Mentos to both de-gas it and also to use as an

!

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Dont forget the tinfoil hat ! = Have insurance, hope you never need it.

 

LOL.... very good :lol:

 

Peanut butter is a good one, it's packed with all sorts including fat, carbohydrates and protein.

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We are a family of five and we keep enough food to survive for 2 months. It’s kept in two large trunks which we rotate on a monthly basis by empting the contents into the cupboards and then refilling the empty trunk from the cash & carry. It’s all of the normal stuff like pasta, rice, kidney, cannellini and baked beans, soy, mayonnaise, Branston and tomato sauce, coffee, tea, salt, sugar, honey, peanut butter, jams, corned beef, soups, tinned veg, tuna, pilchards. In fact everything that we would normally buy in a month that does not need cooling or freezing, added to that we have a hand purifier and tablets, enough for 3 months, BBQ, 2 bottles of LPG, 80 litres of diesel, 20 litres of petrol and a shotgun.

 

I am not a survivalist but a realist, most of the shops in the UK only carry 4 days worth of food, the supply chain has less than a month of stock and the UK imports more food than it grows. I can’t find the linky but even the New Scientist magazine said the system was barking mad and ripe for a failure. It nearly happened in some areas last year during the floods in the UK. I also remember in a very hard winter in the 70’s delivering bread, tinned food and water to outlying villages and farms in the South West as the only thing that could move were Army SnowCats and helicopters.

 

The country has a lot more people in it now and all it needs is for something to push it over the edge, systemic financial failure would do it and so could a series of strikes or civil unrest. I hope that it never happens but I would be safe rather than sorry.

 

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@ id5

 

Impressively well organized. Only a few weeks ago HM gov was consulting with supermarkets about emergency arrangements in case there were a lorry drivers' strike. What about drinking/cooking water? You didn't mention it.

 

You don't need to be a survivalist nut to stock up on essentials and you are an inspiration. Which reminds me, I need to get more serious about my food etc. stock which I have started on, but have been a bit lazy.

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I remember watching a film, where the sicentists were saying that if you dry gasoline (ie remove all the water from it) the fuel wont burn. This makes me think you could improve mileage just adding water to gasoline.

 

But how long will tne engine last

 

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Impressively well organized.

......

but have been a bit lazy.

 

I agree on both counts !

 

I also wash out the 3L bottles of apple juice we get here, and fill with tap water and put the fill date.

That will get refilled after ? time.

 

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How would any of you guys cope with disruptions to essential utility services?

 

Say, electricity/gas shortages or rationing, etc.

 

How are you going to manage for heating and cooking food?

 

And also, lets say that a financial armageddon occurred, and there was food rationing and hyperinflation... so you've got to keep your stockpiles of food a secret.... and then you're out in the garden with your BBQ's grilling steak!! Lol, might that not arouse suspicion from any onlookers?

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I agree on both counts !

 

I also wash out the 3L bottles of apple juice we get here, and fill with tap water and put the fill date.

That will get refilled after ? time.

 

Found the list. It comes from FEMA:

 

Long-Term Food Supplies

In the unlikely event of a military attack or some other national disaster, you may need long-term emergency food supplies. The best approach is to store large amounts of staples along with a variety of canned and dried foods.

 

Bulk quantities of wheat, corn, beans and salt are inexpensive and have nearly unlimited shelf life. If necessary, you could survive for years on small daily amounts of these staples. Stock the following amounts per person, per month:

 

Wheat--20 pounds

Powdered Milk(for babies and infants)*-- 20 pounds

Corn--20 pounds

Iodized Salt--1 pound

Soybeans--10 pounds

Vitamin C**--15 grams

 

* Buy in nitrogen-packed cans

** Rotate every two years

 

Storage and Preparation of Food Supplies

Store wheat, corn and beans in sealed cans or plastic buckets. Buy powdered milk in nitrogen-packed cans. And leave salt and vitamin C in their original packages.

 

If these staples comprise your entire menu, you must eat all of them together to stay healthy. To avoid serious digestive problems, you'll need to grind the corn and wheat into flour and cook them, as well as boil the beans, before eating. Many health food stores sell hand-cranked grain mills or can tell you where you can get one. Make sure you buy one that can grind corn. If you are caught without a mill, you can grind your grain by filling a large can with whole grain one inch deep, holding the can on the ground between your feet and pounding the grain with a pipe.

 

Nutrition Tips

In a crisis, it will be vital that you maintain your strength. So remember:

 

Eat at least one well-balanced meal each day.

Drink enough liquid to enable your body to function properly (two quarts a day).

Take in enough calories to enable you to do any necessary work.

Include vitamin, mineral and protein supplements in your stockpile to assure adequate nutrition.

 

Like I said, a meal of ground wheat, corn salt and soybeans does not sound appertising but if that's what it takes!

 

Water details below (BTW 1 Quart is roughly 1 Liter) and I seem to remember that you should change the water every 6 months:

 

WATER: THE ABSOLUTE NECESSITY

Stocking water reserves and learning how to purify contaminated water should be among your top priorities in preparing for an emergency. You should store at least a two-week supply of water for each member of your family. Everyone's needs will differ, depending upon age, physical condition, activity, diet and climate. A normally active person needs to drink at least two quarts of water each day. Hot environments can double that amount. Children, nursing mothers and ill people will need more. You will need additional water for food preparation and hygiene. Store a total of at least one gallon per person, per day.

 

If your supplies begin to run low, remember: Never ration water. Drink the amount you need today, and try to find more for tomorrow. You can minimize the amount of water your body needs by reducing activity and staying cool.

 

How to Store Emergency Water Supplies

You can store your water in thoroughly washed plastic, glass, fiberglass or enamel-lined metal containers. Never use a container that has held toxic substances, because tiny amounts may remain in the container's pores. Sound plastic containers, such as soft drink bottles, are best. You can also purchase food-grade plastic buckets or drums.

 

Before storing your water, treat it with a preservative, such as chlorine bleach, to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Use liquid bleach that contains 5.25 percent sodium hypochlorite and no soap. Some containers warn, "Not For Personal Use." You can disregard these warnings if the label states sodium hypochlorite is the only active ingredient and if you use only the small quantities in these instructions.

 

Add four drops of bleach per quart of water (or two scant teaspoons per 10 gallons), and stir. Seal your water containers tightly, label them and store them in a cool, dark place.

 

Hidden Water Sources in Your Home

If a disaster catches you without a stored supply of clean water, you can use water in your hot-water tank, in your plumbing and in ice cubes. As a last resort, you can use water in the reservoir tank of your toilet (not the bowl), but purify it first (described later).

 

Water beds hold up to 400 gallons, but some water beds contain toxic chemicals that are not fully removed by many purifiers. If you designate a water bed in your home as an emergency resource, drain it yearly and refill it with fresh water containing two ounces of bleach per 120 gallons.

 

To use the water in your pipes, let air into the plumbing by turning on the highest faucet in your house and draining the water from the lowest one.

 

To use the water in your hot-water tank, be sure the electricity or gas is off, and open the drain at the bottom of the tank. Start the water flowing by turning off the water intake valve and turning on a hot-water faucet. Do not turn on the gas or electricity when the tank is empty.

 

Do you know the location of your incoming water valve? You'll need to shut if off to stop contaminated water from entering your home if you hear reports of broken water or sewage lines.

 

Emergency Outdoor Water Sources

If you need to seek water outside your home, you can use these sources. But purify the water before drinking it.

 

Rainwater

Streams, rivers and other moving bodies of water

Ponds and lakes

Natural springs

Avoid water with floating material, an odor or dark color. Use saltwater only if you distill it first (described later).

 

Three Easy Ways to Purify Water

In addition to having a bad odor and taste, contaminated water can contain microorganisms that cause diseases such as dysentery, cholera, typhoid and hepatitis. You should therefore purify all water of uncertain purity before using it for drinking, food preparation or hygiene.

 

There are many ways to purify water. None are perfect. Often the best solution is a combination of methods. Before purifying, let any suspended particles settle to the bottom, or strain them through layers of paper towel or clean cloth.

 

Three easy purification methods are outlined below. These measures will kill microbes but will not remove other contaminants such as heavy metals, salts, most other chemicals and radioactive fallout.

 

Boiling is the safest method of purifying water. Bring water to a rolling boil for 10 minutes, keeping in mind that some water will evaporate. Let the water cool before drinking.

 

Boiled water will taste better if you put oxygen back into it by pouring it back and forth between two containers. This will also improve the taste of stored water.

 

Chlorination uses liquid chlorine bleach to kill microorganisms. (See page 1 for bleach safety information.) Add two drops of bleach per quart of water (four drops if the water is cloudy), stir and let stand for 30 minutes. If the water does not taste and smell of chlorine at that point, add another dose and let stand another 15 minutes.

 

If you do not have a dropper, use a spoon and a square-ended strip of paper or thin cloth about 1/4 inch by 2 inches. Put the strip in the spoon with an end hanging down about 1/2 inch below the scoop of the spoon. Place bleach in the spoon and carefully tip it. Drops the size of those from a medicine dropper will drip off the end of the strip.

 

Purification tablets release chlorine or iodine. They are inexpensive and available at most sporting goods stores and some drugstores. Follow the package directions. Usually one tablet is enough for one quart of water. Double the dose for cloudy water.

 

More Rigorous Purification Methods

While the three methods described above will remove only microbes from water, the following two purification methods will remove other contaminants. Distillation will remove microbes, heavy metals, salts, most other chemicals, and radioactive dust and dirt, called radioactive fallout. Filtering will also remove radioactive fallout. (Water itself cannot become radioactive, but it can be contaminated by radioactive fallout. It is unsafe to drink water that contains radioactive fallout.)

 

Distillation involves boiling water and then collecting the vapor that condenses back to water. The condensed vapor will not include salt and other impurities. To distill, fill a pot halfway with water. Tie a cup to the handle on the pot's lid so that the cup will hang right-side-up when the lid is upside-down (make sure the cup is not dangling into the water) and boil the water for 20 minutes. The water that drips from the lid into the cup is distilled.

 

To make a fallout filter, punch holes in the bottom of a large bucket, and put a layer of gravel in the bucket about 1-1/2 inches high. Cover the gravel with a towel cut in a circle slightly larger than the bucket. Cover soil with a towel, place the filter over a large container, and pour contaminated water through. Then, disinfect the filtered water using one of the methods described above. Change the soil in your filter after every 50 quarts of water.

 

One final thing for all Kiwi's is to think about joining their local Civil Defence unit. Not a lot happens in them (they only meet one evening per month) but it is very interesting to see what their job in a disaster is (basically reporting of the situation to the emergency management people, they are not there to supply food or rescue services) and there are a number of training courses that show you how to use radios, manage people, sort out power and lighting etc.

If nothing else, it at least destroys any illusions you may have about help instantly coming from somewhere. You are on your own, buddy!

 

 

 

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...

 

but have been a bit lazy.

 

Thanks Wren, I am glad you are a bit lazy, that way you won't be arsed to find out where I live so if the SHTF I won't have to fend you off from our food :lol:

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...

That will get refilled after ? time.

 

Seriously don't bother Steve.

 

Get yourself one of these http://www.msrgear.com/watertreatment/sweetwater.asp, a spare filter, a box of the big Aqua Tabs and a couple of clean 20 litre water cans from a camping/caravan store. The whole lot can sit unused for years and when you need it you will have 100% pure water from almost any water source.

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Seriously don't bother Steve.

 

Get yourself one of these http://www.msrgear.com/watertreatment/sweetwater.asp, a spare filter, a box of the big Aqua Tabs and a couple of clean 20 litre water cans from a camping/caravan store. The whole lot can sit unused for years and when you need it you will have 100% pure water from almost any water source.

 

Surely the sensible thing to do if you have the 20 litre cans is to fill them with clean water whilst you can rather than having to try to find a water source immediately after an emergency / disaster? Then you at least have a few days supply before you need to try to find a water source near your home.

Interesting thought though is where would I get water from in the city if I had none? I am ok here (by a lake and river) but back in Wellington it would have meant purifying sea water. Thanks for making me ponder...:-)

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Surely the sensible thing to do if you have the 20 litre cans is to fill them with clean water whilst you can rather than having to try to find a water source immediately after an emergency / disaster? Then you at least have a few days supply before you need to try to find a water source near your home.

Interesting thought though is where would I get water from in the city if I had none? I am ok here (by a lake and river) but back in Wellington it would have meant purifying sea water. Thanks for making me ponder...:-)

 

Water is a pain to keep fresh unless you have a big lake of the stuff it will not stay clean. Even big clean looking mountain lakes can be full of nasty little things that will give you diarrhoea as well as other contaminates.

 

It is very difficult to keep water as both the water and the container need to be purified. You could fill up the 20 litre container with tap water and have a nice green mess in a few weeks because the container was not purified properly. If you really want to do it then put 5 litres of tap water in a 20 litre container and add a big 20 litre aqua tab, keep on alternately shaking it and letting it stand for about 15 minutes, then dump the water out but run it over the seal on the inside of the cap. Finally fill it full with clean water and add an aqua tab. That will keep it fresh for six months or so.

 

Better to find the water and then purify it as you need it even in Wellington, there are lots of little streams up in the hills that surround the city. It does not really matter with the MSR and aqua tabs where you get the water from, even sewer water can be purified with it but you cannot use sea water, you need a different kind of filter to do that with have a word at your local ship chandlers store, they will be able to get you a hand pump one that works on reverse osmosis.

 

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It is very difficult to keep water as both the water and the container need to be purified. You could fill up the 20 litre container with tap water and have a nice green mess in a few weeks because the container was not purified properly. If you really want to do it then put 5 litres of tap water in a 20 litre container and add a big 20 litre aqua tab, keep on alternately shaking it and letting it stand for about 15 minutes, then dump the water out but run it over the seal on the inside of the cap. Finally fill it full with clean water and add an aqua tab. That will keep it fresh for six months or so.

 

But my point is why not stick tap water in a container, give it a puritab / dosage of bleach to get it relatively clean and then in 5 months time, after the earthquake, use your filter on it to purify it. As you say, you can use the filter to get drinking water out of sewage water so why not use it to purify the water that is conveniently stored in the garage (which I hope would be considerable purer than sewage water even before filtering!) rather than trecking up the local volcano with the masses to find a spring?

Cheers

 

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But my point is why not stick tap water in a container, give it a puritab / dosage of bleach to get it relatively clean and then in 5 months time, after the earthquake, use your filter on it to purify it. As you say, you can use the filter to get drinking water out of sewage water so why not use it to purify the water that is conveniently stored in the garage (which I hope would be considerable purer than sewage water even before filtering!) rather than trecking up the local volcano with the masses to find a spring?

Cheers

 

Because people tend to forget just how long five months is. Unless you make it a part of your normal routine to refresh the container then you will forget or find something more important to do. What we do is keep a couple of rain barrels, attached to downpipes so they constantly refresh. You do not have to remember then.

 

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