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If you would like to know more about safe cracking I highly recommend Matt Blaze’s Safecracking for the Computer Scientist, which WILL give you the essentials on how to crack a standard Group 2 mechanical safe lock by touch, aka manipulation, like Jeff Sitar just demonstrated above.

 

SAFECRACKING - Now there's a career with a future !

Though it may include some time in "The Big House"

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Dec. 14th Happenings - I was the only one who noticed the synchronicity of Wed.

 

Re: David Wilcock receives very serious death threat, after Fulford gets kidnapped

I just checked gold prices and they are on a 60 day low price. I wonder if anything is 'happening'.

http://www.kitco.com/charts/livegold.html

 

Silver is heading a little south too.

http://www.kitco.com/charts/livesilver.html

source: http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?36794-David-Wilcock-receives-very-serious-death-threat-after-Fulford-gets-kidnapped/page13

=== ===

 

GLD-the last 10 days

glddec16.gif

 

Purely a coincidence, in all probability, but I will continue monitoring how that story plays out.

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Were the unknown gold supply story to be true it would be the greatest and best kept secret of all time. All the people who mined the metal, the people who worked shipping it around etc etc ... tens of thousands of people (probably a lot more) would have to keep their mouths shut.

 

Sounds quite unlikely to me. And if it was the case, why is china encouraging its own people to load up on gold/silver? Do they want a revolution? :lol:

 

Also throws up all sorts of interesting astrophysical and geological questions regarding the formation of the stuff in the first place. Also, gold mining is a dirty business that creates a LOT of waste material. For there to be that much more gold in circulation, it follows there would also be a huge amount of additional waste. You might be able to keep people quiet, but how do you conceal the waste from an order of magnitude more gold being mined?

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Also throws up all sorts of interesting astrophysical and geological questions regarding the formation of the stuff in the first place. Also, gold mining is a dirty business that creates a LOT of waste material. For there to be that much more gold in circulation, it follows there would also be a huge amount of additional waste. You might be able to keep people quiet, but how do you conceal the waste from an order of magnitude more gold being mined?

 

I doubt it, in modern times I would generally agree where mercury is used as part of the extraction process, and you would require toxic dump areas for the used chemicals; which adds to the increased extraction costings, but in ancient times gold was mined in relatively shallow mines without the use of chemicals so evidence of ancient mines are almost non-existent as gold was clearly in more abundance and more easily atainable during our ancient ancestors times; and recorded history has displayed plenty of examples of many past kingdoms that do not exist in our current modern times did have plenty of gold, for example the Roman Empire. To add much pillaged gold from war spoils was melted down many times over and hoarded away, so it would almost be impossible to have a true census accounting of how much gold actually exists and this alone allows the speculators to create wonderful myths where so many blindly follow.

To give you an idea I have supplied a link to give you an idea of the size of these existing gold mines, and to make such an enterprise viable would require a considerable amount of gold still exisiting in the ground.

 

http://www.mining-technology.com/projects/lihir/

 

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Yesterday it emerged that the Foreign Office was drawing up contingency plans to evacuate up to a million expats from Spain and Portugal in the event of a European banking crash.

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/eu/8963947/Eurozone-crisis-Foreign-Office-plans-evacuation-of-expatriates.html

You gotta love the `nanny state'. :lol:

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Yesterday it emerged that the Foreign Office was drawing up contingency plans to evacuate up to a million expats from Spain and Portugal in the event of a European banking crash.

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/eu/8963947/Eurozone-crisis-Foreign-Office-plans-evacuation-of-expatriates.html

Let's just hope we don't get a couple of inches of snow, or Katla doesn't blow :D

 

article-1266485-09280FE9000005DC-875_634x460.jpg

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...evidence of ancient mines are almost non-existent as gold was clearly in more abundance and more easily atainable during our ancient ancestors times; and recorded history has displayed plenty of examples of many past kingdoms that do not exist in our current modern times did have plenty of gold, for example the Roman Empire. To add much pillaged gold from war spoils was melted down many times over and hoarded away, so it would almost be impossible to have a true census accounting of how much gold actually exists and this alone allows the speculators to create wonderful myths where so many blindly follow.

I agree with you.

 

But if you look at the estimates of the amount of Gold that exists, they seem to start with a figure near to zero in 1800 or so.

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I agree with you.

 

But if you look at the estimates of the amount of Gold that exists, they seem to start with a figure near to zero in 1800 or so.

 

I'm still waiting to see some evidence presented for the historical abundance of gold and its ease of discovery and production.

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And I have said it all those several 100%s up, too. ;)

You have made some good calls too.

But staying in Gold for the long term may or may not be the best move.

 

Here's a guy with a good track record who would doubt that, Mike Stathis:

 

The BEST use for gold is to capture price volatility via short-term trading.

Its poorest use is as a long-term hold.

 

Now that the gold bubble has (likely) been established, you need to be very careful about buying gold here, unless you plan to trade it. Otherwise, you face the risk of being stuck with it when the bubble pops. The previous down cycle in gold lasted some 23 years. And some investors are still waiting to break even (after adjusting for inflation).

 

/see: http://www.avaresearch.com/avanew/articles/299/Fools-Gold-Part-3.html

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You have made some good calls too.

But staying in Gold for the long term may or may not be the best move.

 

Here's a guy with a good track record who would doubt that, Mike Stathis:

 

The BEST use for gold is to capture price volatility via short-term trading.

Its poorest use is as a long-term hold.

 

 

 

Keeping your assets in the system is a mugs game. I am out, and can stay out till i retire if necessary.

Then, down to the jeweler once a month for my 'pension'.

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Keeping your assets in the system is a mugs game. I am out, and can stay out till i retire if necessary.

Then, down to the jeweler once a month for my 'pension'.

 

 

My link

 

The King Doesn't Like Gold, Never Has, Never Will — Unlike Mr. Chang

 

The last small rally that gold enjoyed carried it to $306 per ounce (it has since fallen back to $290). One of the reasons given for the run-up was that new money was pouring into gold from Japan and China.

We don't get much reliable information about those markets but I've experienced very strong inclination among Asians towards gold.

Which reminds me of my favorite Chinese customer, Mr. Chang.

I don't remember when he first became a customer but it had to be a decade before 1974. He barely spoke English, and I'm not even sure he was legally in the US. He worked in food service at United Airlines, and his wardrobe was Shanghai c.1930.

We didn't have much in common. His English was primitive and my Chinese non-existent.

The only thing we shared was his interest in gold and my desire to sell it to him. In those days we were prohibited from selling anything that could be considered a bullion coin. That didn't matter to Mr. Chang.

There was only one coin he would buy and that was the US $20 Liberty Head coin. He was familiar with it from China and to him the Liberty $20 gold coin was gold and gold was the Liberty $20 gold coin. Any other gold item might as well be counterfeit.

Through the years I saw him almost monthly. He brought his paycheck, would negotiate price, and then decide how many coins he wanted. (The $20 Liberty cost about $50 each.) I would give him change against his check.

Originally, I was amused that he came with his own balance scale. It was made of bamboo with a plate at one end and a weighted rock at the other. It was designed to balance the $20 Liberty. If a coin failed, it was either shaved or counterfeit.

After about a decade I became annoyed with his scale. "Mr. Chang, when in heaven's name will you trust me and not need a scale?"

He considered the scale just part of doing business, but he got my message and was embarrassed. Although his scale was present for the next purchase, I never saw it again after that.

In those days it wasn't easy getting information about the gold price. There was no US market and the London AM and PM fixings were sometimes available on the radio but it often required seeking the financial pages of the Wall Street Journal to learn the value of an ounce of gold.

Mr. Chang followed the price very closely. He would call almost daily, and ask, "Wuddah prica London gol?"

Upon getting the information he would respond: "Very thank you," and that was that. There was never any doubt about it. It was Mr. Chang on the phone.

Then we didn't hear from Mr. Chang for months.

"Has anyone heard from Mr. Chang", I asked? I was sure he was ill or worse.

Then one day there he was. "Wuddah prica London gol?"

I had answered his call and asked, "Mr Chang, have you been ill? We've missed hearing from you."

Dead silence.

How in heaven's name did I know it was him, he wondered. Gold dealers are amazing, with wondrous perceptions. I guess he believed that every customer said, "Very thank you."

Mr. Chang retired. I don't know if he had social security checks coming in, but his gold coins provided for his retirement. He came in as regularly as when he was a buyer. Only this time with one or two gold coins to sell. As he came in the front door, I noted he had coins in his hand, wrapped in tissue paper. He pretended he might be buying to keep me honest, but of course I knew that was not the case.

Then we learned from one of his old Chinese cronies that Mr. Chang had passed on. In fact he had gifted several coins to the friend who gave us the sad news. We dearly missed Mr. Chang, although "Very thank you" had become a part of the language in our office.

Some year or two later a young Chinese woman, whom I later learned was Mr. Chang's grand niece, came in. She was an accountant and evidently had found Mr. Chang's check stubs with Chinese characters on them breaking down how he had spent each check.

She was convinced there were gold coins some place and wondered if we were actually storing them. It was clear that she was not part of Mr. Chang's inner circle.

She left rude and angered.

As if rehearsed, my employees looked at me and in unison we all said: "Very thank you."

 

 

 

 

For 50 years as a dealer, we never stored customer metals

At Coin Shows and Hard money Conventions, we shouted the

message to all, "Take delivery of your metals."

 

Most listened, but just as there is a new audience for the Three Stooges every seven years,

there are always fresh victims who will surrender their gold and silver for a piece of paper.

 

Keep spreading the message, Jason. If you help just one poor sucker to keep

his gold and silver the struggle was worthwhile.

 

Burt Blumert

 

 

 

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The BEST use for gold is to capture price volatility via short-term trading.

Its poorest use is as a long-term hold.

:wacko:

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I'm still waiting to see some evidence presented for the historical abundance of gold and its ease of discovery and production.

 

Aztecs in more recent times comes to mind, and they also did not have in possession current day technology to mine gold. History records that most of the gold that was pillaged was melted down.

 

http://www.aztec-history.com/aztec-jewelry.html

 

And all this carry on was before the 1800's.

 

In Australia during the gold rush, you can still evidence of shallow mines in various places, where much surface gold was extracted.

 

http://www.kidcyber.com.au/topics/gold.htm

 

http://www.finders.com.au/gold-pages/central-victorian-goldfields/the-golden-triangle/

 

These are only examples of recent times........

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I agree with you.

 

But if you look at the estimates of the amount of Gold that exists, they seem to start with a figure near to zero in 1800 or so.

 

Yes it is strange that from offical accounting estimates there was a near to zero figure considering gold coins at that time were circulating as a form of currency.

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One for you Bubbs.....

 

 

"market timing a volatile commodity in an uptrend may not work nearly as well as just buying the stuff and leaving it alone. You only have to mistime one or two of the major moves in the cycle and you have losses that will leave you way behind the buy-and-hold crowd.

 

That goes for the so-called expert traders too. A bit of luck can so easily be confused with judgement when none is involved."

 

http://www.arabianmoney.net/gold-silver/2011/12/19/trying-to-market-time-a-volatile-gold-and-silver-market-is-a-fools-errand/

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I'm still waiting to see some evidence presented for the historical abundance of gold and its ease of discovery and production.

 

 

SO let me get it straight. There are vast quantities of gold hidden away by the illuminati/Rothchilds etc. Gold isn't in fact scarce, so it is really quite worthless. They are conspiring to bid up the price of gold into bubble levels, so they can dump it onto unsuspecting goldbugs. Hmmmmmm.

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Aztecs in more recent times comes to mind, and they also did not have in possession current day technology to mine gold. History records that most of the gold that was pillaged was melted down.

 

http://www.aztec-history.com/aztec-jewelry.html

 

And all this carry on was before the 1800's.

 

In Australia during the gold rush, you can still evidence of shallow mines in various places, where much surface gold was extracted.

 

http://www.kidcyber.com.au/topics/gold.htm

 

http://www.finders.com.au/gold-pages/central-victorian-goldfields/the-golden-triangle/

 

These are only examples of recent times........

 

Those are some interesting examples and I bet there's some good history to be read about the Australian Gold Rush. I've only read bits about Roman and Egyptian mining as well as something of the Klondike Gold Rush. In each case the amounts involved seem to be relatively small by modern standards.

 

The figure generally stated for the entire amount of gold mined in Spain by the Romans was 1400 tons, even using their somewhat sophisticated techniques in the most prolific mining region of its day. I've read Egyptian production stated at 1 ton per year for 3000 years. Supposedly in the Klondike gold rush 20,000 miners managed to produce 600 tons, again in that era's most prolific region.

 

Although it makes sense that there is gold sat there off the books, I've still not seen any numbers about ancient production that suggest major tonnage, at least to the extent that DrBubb is suggesting.

 

SO let me get it straight. There are vast quantities of gold hidden away by the illuminati/Rothchilds etc. Gold isn't in fact scarce, so it is really quite worthless. They are conspiring to bid up the price of gold into bubble levels, so they can dump it onto unsuspecting goldbugs. Hmmmmmm.

 

Something like that :)

 

I've no doubt the Papal hoard could garner a few bob at Cash4Gold and that the assorted Rothschilds have quite a bit of the shiny stuff. But it seems pretty evident that the major overhang of financial assets in the world involves virtual, rather than physical wealth.

 

On a more serious note, maybe the elites are trying to offload "Ram Man" figurines?

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-16207626

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You have made some good calls too.

But staying in Gold for the long term may or may not be the best move.

 

Here's a guy with a good track record who would doubt that, Mike Stathis:

 

The BEST use for gold is to capture price volatility via short-term trading.

Its poorest use is as a long-term hold.

 

Now that the gold bubble has (likely) been established, you need to be very careful about buying gold here, unless you plan to trade it. Otherwise, you face the risk of being stuck with it when the bubble pops. The previous down cycle in gold lasted some 23 years. And some investors are still waiting to break even (after adjusting for inflation).

 

/see: http://www.avaresearch.com/avanew/articles/299/Fools-Gold-Part-3.html

Better to trade silver which is more volatile. Or even better, stay long gold, and trade silver as a hedge.

 

Staying long gold these past 4 years, doubled my liquid worth, and then enabled me to purchase property with half my liquid worth. Free free-hold property anyone? :)

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Better to trade silver which is more volatile. Or even better, stay long gold, and trade silver as a hedge.

 

Staying long gold these past 4 years, doubled my liquid worth, and then enabled me to purchase property with half my liquid worth. Free free-hold property anyone? :)

Actually yes, I purchased a 3 bedroom dump near Cairns QLD for $46k in 2001 and sold it recently for $295k and during that time the rents covered the holding costs.

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You have made some good calls too.

But staying in Gold for the long term may or may not be the best move.

 

Here's a guy with a good track record who would doubt that, Mike Stathis:

 

The BEST use for gold is to capture price volatility via short-term trading.

Its poorest use is as a long-term hold.

 

Now that the gold bubble has (likely) been established, you need to be very careful about buying gold here, unless you plan to trade it. Otherwise, you face the risk of being stuck with it when the bubble pops. The previous down cycle in gold lasted some 23 years. And some investors are still waiting to break even (after adjusting for inflation).

 

/see: http://www.avaresearch.com/avanew/articles/299/Fools-Gold-Part-3.html

 

That article was from 2009, wasn't it?

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One for you Bubbs.....

"market timing a volatile commodity in an uptrend may not work nearly as well as just buying the stuff and leaving it alone. You only have to mistime one or two of the major moves in the cycle and you have losses that will leave you way behind the buy-and-hold crowd.

 

That goes for the so-called expert traders too. A bit of luck can so easily be confused with judgement when none is involved."

http://www.arabianmoney.net/gold-silver/2011/12/19/trying-to-market-time-a-volatile-gold-and-silver-market-is-a-fools-errand/

Hence I have maintained a LONG BIAS in my BBH portfolio.

I merely "Dail up" and ""Dail down" risk (using options) when I think we are at extremes or within "interesting" trading windows.

 

We are within such a trading Window at the moment, and I am buying SLV, AGQ, and SLW calls aggressively

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Actually yes, I purchased a 3 bedroom dump near Cairns QLD for $46k in 2001 and sold it recently for $295k and during that time the rents covered the holding costs.

Congratulations, you got out near the bubble top. Too bad though you didn't sell already in 2004-06 and invest in gold...

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