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Some books I've read lately related to some of the discussions on this BB that I like include:

 

HOT COMMODITIES by Jim Rogers. An easy-to-read analysis of the current bull market in commodities and why it is set to last another ten years at least. (Not so bullish on gold btw). Looks at some comms in more depth.

 

WAKE UP - Survive And Prosper In The Coming Economic Turmoil by Jim Mellon and Al Chalabi. Very scaremongery-y, but compelling and practical nonetheless.

 

THE COMING COLLAPSE OF THE DOLLAR AND HOW TO PROFIT FROM IT - James Turk and John Rubino. Very good guide to investing in PMs. Very simply written. A bit fantastic at the end, perhaps, and it didn't convince my dad. James Turk is also founder of goldmoney. His gold-silver prediction that silver would lead the next move up in PMs a few weeks before silver's meteroric rise has proved v. accurate.

 

What have you read that's good and (briefly) why?

 

(I'm interested in anything on Home Trading. Any tips? Elder's stuff any good?)

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OK, I'll give this one a go...

 

Just finished reading 'Collapse' by Jared Diamond.

 

Good, thoroughly researched and pretty entertaining. Only complaint is that his conclusions are weak, he remains with one foot in the 'we will survive this thing through innovation and hard work' camp and one foot in the 'we are totally screwed' camp.

 

But he draws some good parrallels between our society today and those which collapsed in the past... in effect the globe today is like a giant easter island, still subject to the same destructive forces which caused the downfall of civilization there 1000 years ago, albeit on a much larger scale.

 

My favorite self-sufficiency books are John Seymour 'New Complete Self-sufficiency: The Classic Guide for Realists and Dreamers' this book is worth it's weight in gold, I tell you ! Beautifully illustrated, simple and totally comprehensive !

 

Also 'Self Reliance: A Recipe for the New Millennium' by John Yeoman - some good strategies on unhooking yourself from the consumerist grid and becomming more independant. Some of his ideas are 'outside the box' and make for very interesting reading.

 

And dont forget 'Square Foot Gardening' by Mel Bartholemew - freaky how much sh*t you can grow in your little yard if you apply these techniques !!! Easily the best gardening book out there.

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I too recently read' WAKE UP - Survive And Prosper In The Coming Economic Turmoil by Jim Mellon and Al Chalabi. You can save time by simply subscribing to the Daily Reckoning to get the same message.

 

I am currently reading Hedge Hogging by Barton Biggs, about the people behind the hedge fund industry and his experience in setting up a fund. Not a how to book, but plenty of investment anecdotes and worthwhile tips on the psychology of market behaviour.

 

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Also have Jim Rogers Adventure Capitalist. Will get there eventually.

 

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Forgot to mention Market Wizards and Market Wizards Two, whatever it's called.

 

Basically, it's transcriptions of interviews with top traders and investors. Full of great stories, strategies and experience. very readable.

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Hey Guys,

 

I am selling or giving away all my investment books.

Have given away quite a few already.

Many I have left are classics

 

Here's what is left:

 

Hard cover

+ Major Works of R.N. Elliott , edited by Robert Prechter,

+ Technical Analysis of Futures Market , John J. Murphy

+ Markets & Market Logic , J. Peter Steidlmayer

+ Seasonal Concepts in Futures Trading , Jacob Benstein,

+ Seasonality, systems strategies & signals , Jake Bernstein

+ The Wall Street Waltz , ...

+ Strategic Market Timing , Robert Bowker

+ Beat The Market , Edward O. Thorp

+ The Tunnel Through the Air , W.D. Gann

+ Mind Over Markets, Power Trading , James F. Dalton etc.

+ Dynamic Stock Option Trading, James T. Stewart

+ Candle Power, advanced Candlestick Patterns , Gregory Morris

+ Electronic Day Traders' Secrets , Marc Friefertig & George West

+ Dynamic Hedging, Managing Vanilla & Exotic Options , Nassir Taleb

+ The Fractal Geometry of Nature , Benoit Mandlebrot

+ The Handbook of Currency & Interest Rate Risk Mgt. , ed. by Robt.Schwartz

 

Paper back

+ The New Market Wizards , Jack D, Schwager

+ The Misbehaviour of Markets , Benoit Mandlebrot

+ How to Make Profits in Commodities , W.D. Gann

+ The Roaring 2000s , Harry S. Dent, Jr.

+ The World in Depression, 1929- 1939 , Charles Kindleberger

+ The Long Wave in Economic Life , JJ. van Dujin

+ The Cycles of Heaven , Guy Lyon Playfair & Scott Hill

+ Catalog of Cycles, Pt.1 Economics , Louise L. Wilson

+ Cycles: The Science of Prediction , Edward Dewey & Edwin Dakin

+ One Up on Wall Street, Peter Lynch

+ Moneywise, Guide to Tax , Jo Hanks

+ Paying Less Tax 2005/2006 for Dummies , Tony Levene

 

++ more coming right up ++

 

If you bought then new, it is probably Pds800- 1,000 worth of books.

I might sell them individually, or as the whole package. But you will ahve to come

and pick them up.

 

If I get a decent offer here, I would rather sell them thru GEI, and thru Ebay.

 

Any interest?

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The Great Crash 1929 - John Kenneth Galbraith.

 

Absolutely essential reading for anyone interested in markets and the behaviour of people.

 

He's also written "A Brief History of Financial Euphoria", very informative, as usual when you mix greed, stupidity,borrowed money and leverage you get very interesting (and predictable) results.

 

Also just finished reading "When Genius Failed", Roger Lowenstein.

The collapse of LTCM, the hedge fund that had 2 Nobel Laureates on its staff, and blew a $1 trillion hole in the financial markets using derivatives.

 

Before reading that book you should read Liar's Poker, by Michael Lewis. Easy reading, and it introdueces you to the boys who created LTCM, Meriwether, Hilibrand and co.

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"Crashes - why they happen - what to do" by Robert Beckman published by Grafton. He's also published a couple of others - 'The downwave' and 'Into then upwave' which I haven't read.

 

Nice essays from Tulipomania to the Crash of '87, including along the way: South sea Bubble, Chicago/Florida property crash, the Silver crash, and the crash of the second line banks in the UK during the '70s. Very readable and non-technical so good for the layman like me. I'm lending it to someone at work who I'm trying to dissuade from buying property with a loan from his parents.....

 

TLM

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Beckman has also written a good book on the Elliottwave: "Superwave",

which i owned, and offloaded last weekend

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And dont forget 'Square Foot Gardening' by Mel Bartholemew - freaky how much sh*t you can grow in your little yard if you apply these techniques !!! Easily the best gardening book out there.

just ordered this thanks for the recommendation

 

have just finished reading "the coming economic collapse" - a good book about how there is a coming energy crisis and some ideas on what to do about it ; also gives some investment strategies for the coming decade - author basically thinks we are going to get high inflation (so oil, gold, tips(USA) and real estate :) ).

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Hello all. First post, but I've been around a bit on HPC and other fora.

 

A couple of books at the top of my favourite list will always be:

 

Common Stocks & Uncommon Profits (Phil Fisher)

One Up on Wall Street (Peter Lynch)

 

 

"The Intelligent Investor", while it is a much revered book and forms the framework for value-investing, is about as much fun to read as eating a raw potato.

 

A couple of other good trading books I've read are Schwager, Alexander Elder, although I must stress that they should only be tackled after you have formed a solid foundation in fundamental analysis.

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Hello all. First post, but I've been around a bit on HPC and other fora.

 

A couple of books at the top of my favourite list will always be:

 

Common Stocks & Uncommon Profits (Phil Fisher)

One Up on Wall Street (Peter Lynch)

"The Intelligent Investor", while it is a much revered book and forms the framework for value-investing, is about as much fun to read as eating a raw potato.

 

A couple of other good trading books I've read are Schwager, Alexander Elder, although I must stress that they should only be tackled after you have formed a solid foundation in fundamental analysis.

if you managed to eat the whole potato - you did better than me

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I am ready to do something with these books now

 

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If you live in the London area, and are interested, let's talk

 

Hard cover

+ Major Works of R.N. Elliott , edited by Robert Prechter,

+ Conquer the Crash , Robert Prechter, Jr.

+ Technical Analysis of Futures Market , John J. Murphy

+ Markets & Market Logic , J. Peter Steidlmayer

+ Seasonal Concepts in Futures Trading , Jacob Benstein,

+ Seasonality, systems strategies & signals , Jake Bernstein

+ The Wall Street Waltz , ...

+ Strategic Market Timing , Robert Bowker

+ Beat The Market , Edward O. Thorp

+ The Tunnel Through the Air , W.D. Gann

+ Mind Over Markets, Power Trading , James F. Dalton etc.

+ Dynamic Stock Option Trading, James T. Stewart

+ Candle Power, advanced Candlestick Patterns , Gregory Morris

+ Electronic Day Traders' Secrets , Marc Friefertig & George West

+ Dynamic Hedging, Managing Vanilla & Exotic Options , Nassir Taleb

+ The Fractal Geometry of Nature , Benoit Mandlebrot

+ The Handbook of Currency & Interest Rate Risk Mgt. , ed. by Robt.Schwartz

 

Paper back

+ The New Market Wizards , Jack D, Schwager

+ The Misbehaviour of Markets , Benoit Mandlebrot

+ How to Make Profits in Commodities , W.D. Gann

+ How to Make Money in Stocks , William O'Neil

+ The Roaring 2000s , Harry S. Dent, Jr.

+ The World in Depression, 1929- 1939 , Charles Kindleberger

+ The Long Wave in Economic Life , JJ. van Dujin

+ The Cycles of Heaven , Guy Lyon Playfair & Scott Hill

+ Catalog of Cycles, Pt.1 Economics , Louise L. Wilson

+ Cycles: The Science of Prediction , Edward Dewey & Edwin Dakin

+ One Up on Wall Street, Peter Lynch

+ Downshift, Restore your work-life to balance, Jonquil Lowe

+ Moneywise, Guide to Tax , Jo Hanks

+ Paying Less Tax 2005/2006 for Dummies , Tony Levene

 

ROUGH IDEA...

Your choice:

Say £15 for the first book, £12 for the second, with any additional books: £10.

If you buy a hard cover, then your choice of soft covers for £5 each.

 

(Will cut prices, once some books have been sold. I assume the "best books" will go first)

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"How To Win Friends, And Influence People" by Dale Carnegie.

 

Not an investment book, but a must read for anyone who has to do business with other people.( That's all of us, isn't it?)

Don't let the Johnny-No-Mates title put you off.

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Good guess, Dom.

 

I would prefer to "share the wealth" of investment ideas with many here. A few people have already PM-ed about certain books. And if it is a regular poster on GEI who wants say 5-10 books and can pick them up, I will happily do a special price

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On the subject of books...I just finished reading Fred Harrison, 'Boom & Bust- House Prices, Banking and The Depression of 2010'

 

Has anyone read this book ? If so, what did you think of it ?

 

I enjoyed it, and have no qualms with his theory of 18-year cycles in the land market.

 

Only 2 complaints:

 

1) He tells us that land value cycles have become globally synchronized after WW2. However the evidence would seem to contradict this assertion. Japanese land values have been falling for quite a while and the German property market seems pretty stagnant lately too, although I think both are likely to see an upswing soon. The only markets which seem to be synchronized are the US, UK and Australia. Some other markets have seen upturns around the same time as these three, but it seems to be a result of British buyers opting for second homes or investment properties in Spain, Bulgaria etc

 

2) The title is a little sensationalist - he seems like a serious commentator, his predicitions are pretty much panning out nicely but predicting a 'depression' is a little risky. He's quite sketchy as well as to how bad this Depression will be, and why he thinks a Depression is likely and not just a bad recession like we had last time around. Unless of course, a depression and a recession are seen by many as one and the same thing.

I, however see a distinct difference between the two. to quote Ronnie Regan, 'a recession is when your neighbour loses his job, a depression is when YOU lose your own'.

 

 

Have just begun reading Harold K Shipler ' The Working Poor' - 25 pages in and it is excellent, I hope it remains so throughout the duration.

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I've just started reading Confessions of an Economic Hit Man by John Perkins. So far, quite good. You can listen to his Financial Sense Interview here.

 

http://www.financialsense.com/Experts/2005/Perkins.html

 

I read the review of that in the guardian a little while back, interesting. Im obviously way behind you guys...starting out essentially, so anything I say here will only be of interest to fellow newbs. Economics by Sloman is an essentiall book which covers all the basics of economic dynamics and market behavior, a nice 'foundation' if you like. The next book was trading for dummies **waits for laughing to die down** which despite the name, gives the novice a sound introduction to technical and fundemental analysis, trading platforms, terminology and balanced opinion of strategy etc etc. Im now reading 'conquer the crash' by Prechter, and 'contrarian investing strategies' by Dreman. Its too early to give any meaningful opinion on these.

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I read the review of that in the guardian a little while back, interesting. Im obviously way behind you guys...starting out essentially, so anything I say here will only be of interest to fellow newbs. Economics by Sloman is an essentiall book which covers all the basics of economic dynamics and market behavior, a nice 'foundation' if you like. The next book was trading for dummies **waits for laughing to die down** which despite the name, gives the novice a sound introduction to technical and fundemental analysis, trading platforms, terminology and balanced opinion of strategy etc etc. Im now reading 'conquer the crash' by Prechter, and 'contrarian investing strategies' by Dreman. Its too early to give any meaningful opinion on these.

 

 

Nothing wrong with that for Dummies book. As good an introduction as anything and the Dummies series are quite good in general as an intro.

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Nothing wrong with that for Dummies book. As good an introduction as anything and the Dummies series are quite good in general as an intro.

 

The Dreman book - The Contrarian Investor - fundamentally changed my stockpicking behaviour and marks the point where I stopped losing money in shares.

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thnx, Guest - whoever you are.

And exactly what do you do differently?

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My current favourite the "The Dollar Crisis", by Richard Duncan.

 

Probably th best analysis I have read to-date regarding the structural flaws in the Dollar, and what is likely to trigger the slide. The scary part about this book is that it's starting to happen now!

 

The author posts some austere warnings and possible solutions, but ultimately it looks like America is going to have to go through an ugly recession before the population will have the will to fix the problems.

 

History doesn't repeat, but it sure rhymes...

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Just done The Barefoot Investor.

 

Wouldn't bother. It's so basic. Basically it tells students to save rather than spend.

 

But it was surprisingly bearish on housing in the UK.

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