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Austria,Poland,Slovakia and Czech govts hard right=EU in trouble

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Austria,Poland,Slovakia and Czech govts hard right / EU in trouble

 

http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/867726/Austria-election-EU-Visegrad-group-Sebastian-Kurz-FPO

 

'Now reports in the Polish press suggest the FPO could insist Austria joins the Visegrad group, a four-nation alliance of the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia that is opposed to immigration, as a condition of forming a coalition.

The Visegrad leaders have previously refused migrant quotas approved by a western-dominated majority of European Union member states.

And they also reject proposed EU reforms that would transfer more power from national governments to Brussels institutions.

Joining the alliance was supported by the FPO in its election campaign.'

 

 

EU going to struggle now imposing Merkel's immigration policies on everyone else.

 

Just when the EU and the SJW's thought they'd seen the people off with Macron's win,it suddenly dawns that they still ahve a problem.The people are waking up.

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http://www.breitbart.com/london/2017/10/21/eurosceptic-czech-trump-ahead-early-count-national-election-anti-migration-freedom-party-second/

'

With over 99 per cent of the vote counted, the party of the populist Czech billionaire described by some as the ‘Czech Trump’ has achieved a considerable victory in the national legislative elections — with the mainstream left Social Democrat party achieving their worst result in national history.

With an estimated fortune of over four billion, ANO [YES] party leader Andrej Babis is even wealthier than U.S. president Donald Trump, and has used his wealth since the 2011 founding of his party in a crusade to change Czech politics. Originally founded to oppose government corruption, the party has since come to oppose the Euro currency, European Union federalism, and mass migration.

Businessman Babis was finance minister of the Czech Republic from January 2014 to May 2017, but this election could see him returned as the leader of the largest party and not needing the support of the Social Democrat party he served under.

UPDATE: 1900 CET

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The count for this remarkable election is now all but complete, with Czech billionaire and populist leader Andrej Babis leading a party commanding 29.66 per cent of the vote — a significant proportion given the largest party in the last election in 2013 only achieved 20.45 per cent of the vote.

That same Social Democrat party — known as the orange party in Czechia for their corporate colour scheme — has this time recorded their worst ever result, reports Czech newspaper Lidovky, at just 7.7 per cent, putting them in sixth.

Ahead now of that former giant of Czech politics are the liberal-conservative Civic Democratic Party in second with 11.31 per cent. Behind them in third are the left-liberal Pirate Party at 10.78 per cent, and the anti-Islamification, anti-mass migration and Eurosceptic Freedom and Direct Democracy party, who have achieved above expectations to come fourth with 10.64 per cent.

The original story continues below:

Czechia: Centre-right STAN (EPP) 0.1% above threshold (73.4% counted). #volby #volby2017 pic.twitter.com/BLGm2ya2kc

— Europe Elects (@EuropeElects) October 21, 2017

The Czech Statistics Office said ANO has received around 30 per cent of the vote after ballots from 80 perc ent of the polling stations have been counted.

The Czech Republic’s most radical anti-Islam, anti-migration, anti-EU party, Freedom and Direct Democracy, is in second with 11 percent of the vote so far. If this figure is confirmed it would put the anti mass-migration party well ahead of recent polls which have put them consistently below the 10 per cent mark, and at times even lower than five per cent.

Trailing in third are the Communists, with 9.5 percent of the vote.'

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Czech's Donald Trump:

 

V5kaKeN.jpg

 

ANO [YES] party leader Andrej Babis* is even wealthier than U.S. president Donald Trump,

and has used his wealth since the 2011 founding of his party in a crusade to change Czech politics. Originally founded to oppose government corruption, the party has since come to oppose the Euro currency, European Union federalism, and mass migration.

 

Thank God there are some wealthy people who see the danger in these madman policies, and are willing to do something about it

 

*Wiki entry:

Andrej Babiš (Czech pronunciation: [ˈandrɛj ˈbabɪʃ]; born 2 September 1954) is a Czech entrepreneur and businessman. He is the founder and leader of ANO 2011, and is the Prime Minister-designate after his party won the most seats at the October 2017 legislative election.[1]

Babiš served as Finance Minister of the Czech Republic and Deputy Prime Minister responsible for the economy from January 2014 to May 2017 until he was dismissed by Prime Minister Bohuslav Sobotka due to allegations of financial irregularities. Babiš has led ANO 2011 since founding it in 2012 as a protest movement against established politics. He has been Member of the Chamber of Deputies (MP) since 2013. Babiš, the second richest man in the Czech Republic, is a former CEO and sole owner of the Agrofert group[2] with a net worth of about $4.04 billion according to Bloomberg.[3]

Andrej Babiš was sacked from the government by Prime Minister Bohuslav Sobotka on 24 May 2017 after month-long coalition crisis that initially started with allegations that he avoided paying taxes as CEO of Agrofert in 2012. Despite this, Babiš is considered to be one of the most popular politicians in the Czech Republic[4] and some political pundits predict that he will become Prime Minister himself following the 2017 Czech legislative election.[5]

. . .

Lety camp controversial comments

On 1 September 2016, while visiting Varnsdorf, a city with large Romani minority presence Babiš said: "What those idiots (journalists) write in newspapers, that camp in Lety was a concentration camp, that is a lie, it was a labor camp, who didn't work ended up there."[74] Babiš was heavily criticized for his words from both coalition partners and opposition MPs calling on him to resign. Prime Minister Bohuslav Sobotka posted on Facebook condemnation saying that "between populism and extremism is a thin line and Babiš crossed over it" and asked him to "properly apologize and visit Lety to learn about history of our state".[75]

Minister for Human Rights and Equal Opportunities Jiří Dienstbier has called on Babiš to step down as Finance Minister and First Deputy Prime Minister.[76] Leaders of both opposition parties Petr Fiala from ODS and Miroslav Kalousek from TOP 09 have also called on Babiš to step down

==

> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrej_Babi%C5%A1

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Anti-establishment billionaire Andrej Babiš to be named Czech PM ...

 

https://www.theguardian.com › World › Czech Republic

7 hours ago - Babiš's ANO took largest share of vote in election but may struggle to ... Andrej Babiš embraces a colleague at a press conference in Prague.

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Can this happen in the Czech Republic?

 

Is ESTONIA the European SILICON VALLEY? - VisualPolitik EN

 

"A pioneering country in many fields"

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The people are rising.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/oct/22/anti-establishment-billionaire-andrej-babis-to-be-named-czech-pm

'Babiš led his new party ANO – “ano” is Czech for “yes” – to a resounding poll victory, winning almost 30% of the vote.

The election ended a quarter of a century of political dominance by the traditional parties of the Czech mainstream, with the Social and Christian Democrats scoring just 7% and 6% respectively.

Voters largely turned their backs on liberal pro-European parties, with the centre-right Civic Democrats winning 11% of the vote, the direct democracy advocates of the Pirate party 10.6% and the far-right, anti–EU SPD 10.8%.

 

Unusually for such a populist politician, his victory comes not at a time of economic downturn in the Czech economy but at a moment when the country of 10.6 million people is enjoying strong growth, robust wage increases and low levels of unemployment.

In recent years many Czechs have been far from confident in their country’s economic stability, however, and have come to resent immigration and what they see as cronyism in government and the legal system.'

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