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Perishabull

The life and times of the Cryptocurrency markets

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21 hours ago, drbubb said:

How crazy can it get?

Borrow against your home, to buy the MOST SPECULATIVE "investment" in history!

How crazy?

My god, have you heard of cryptokitties?

CATS

Ethereum price and how to buy – what are CryptoKitties and is the cryptocurrency worth as much as Bitcoin?

https://www.thesun.co.uk/money/5087162/ethereum-price-cryptokitties-cryptocurrency-bitcoin-currency-trading/

 

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Bitcoin Futures : where, what & how they work

bitcoin-futures-459x293.jpg

- The Cboe Bitcoin Futures Contract uses the ticker XBT and will equal one bitcoin.
- The CME Bitcoin Futures Contract will use the ticker BTC and will equal five bitcoins.
- Cash Settled in USD : Both Cboe’s and CME’s bitcoin futures contracts will be settled in U.S. dollars, allowing exposure to the bitcoin without actually having to hold any of the cryptocurrency.
- Different Settlement mechanism:

-Cboe’s contract is priced off of a single auction at 4 p.m. Eastern time (2100 GMT) on the final settlement date on the Gemini cryptocurrency exchange.

-CME’s contract will be priced off of the CME Bitcoin Reference Rate, an index that references pricing data from cryptocurrency exchanges, currently made up of Bitstamp, GDAX, itBit and Kraken.

===
===
Hmm.
Both contracts seem open to manipulation, and especially the CBOE with a settlement based off a single exchange .
Another point is that they are likely to settle at different prices, maybe very different prices depending on the quirks of the exchanges

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(I received this by email - and thought it might be of interest to readers here):

Teeka Tiwari on How "I Vastly Underestimated Bitcoin"

Nick Rokke, analyst, The Palm Beach Daily: T, you just left Consensus in New York… It’s one of the biggest cryptocurrency conferences in the world. What was it like?

Teeka Tiwari, editor, The Palm Beach Letter: The energy there is incredible. It’s exciting. And all these guys want to network… get to know each other, and talk cryptos.

It’s a new field and there are no established players yet. And if you’re not out there networking, you’re going to be left behind.

I only planned to stay one night… But I stayed longer. I kept getting invited to private events hosted by hedge funds and initial coin offering (ICO) projects. I find some of my best ideas at these events.

One party I attended was hosted by Mike Novogratz. He’s the manager of the biggest crypto hedge fund in the world. And he was one of the first Wall Street guys to realize the importance of cryptos.

A couple years ago, Mike invested $500,000 in ether when it was under $1 per coin. He’s been following the space for a while.

So, I wasn’t going to turn down an invite to his party.

Recommended Link
 
 

Nick: Who attends a cryptocurrency party?

Teeka: This one had a lot of young entrepreneurs. But these weren’t your typical, foolhardy young entrepreneurs. These were really sophisticated guys. What was different about these guys from other entrepreneurs I’ve seen in the past is they already have existing businesses.

One young man I met has 300,000 users on his blockchain application. Another person had 200,000 people on his platform. This is a big difference from the deals we’ve seen so far, which have been little more than a good idea and a white paper.

The quality of projects coming to market in 2018 is very high.

Nick: What does that mean for investors?

Teeka: It means there will be a lot more opportunities to profit from cryptocurrencies.

And the big boys are taking notice. They’re excited about these new projects.

Over 1,700 people attended this conference. And most of them were from hedge funds, venture capital firms, family offices, and endowment funds.

These are all people who are slinging around billions of dollars. And they’re all excited about investing in the cryptocurrency market. They wanted to meet these young entrepreneurs.

That’s the biggest thing I noticed… the amount of institutional demand for cryptocurrencies that’s out there.

I vastly underestimated how badly institutions want to get into this space… vastly underestimated.

Recommended Link
 
 

Nick: How’s that possible? You’ve been talking about the tidal wave of money coming into cryptos all year.

Teeka: It’s not going to be a tidal wave… It’s going to be the biggest ocean of money in the history of the world.

And that money hasn’t even hit the markets yet. The opportunity in cryptos is just beginning.

But back to your question. Here’s why institutional demand is much bigger than I initially thought…

These institutional investors will be able to trade the new bitcoin futures contracts later this year. But that’s not the same as owning physical bitcoin. Right now, they can’t own bitcoin because of an issue called “custody.”

You see, these large funds can’t hold onto their own investments. Most of them have contracts that state a third party will hold onto their assets as a custodian. This rule is in place to protect investors from potential fraud.

So, these funds have institutions like Morgan Stanley or Goldman Sachs have “custody” of their investments.

There are no institutional-grade custodians for cryptocurrencies yet. They need that piece in place before they can put money to work in the actual bitcoin market.

Think about it being the difference between owning a futures contract on gold and actually owning gold bars.

A futures contract can be held in a brokerage account whereas a gold bar needs to be held in a physical vault. As I said, right now there are no bitcoin “vaults” approved for institutional use.

The good news is that will change next year. A slew of new companies is rising up to meet the custody challenge.

Once custody is in place, the stage will be set for institutions to trade in the physical bitcoin market. And when that happens, billions—or even trillions—of dollars will be flowing into the space.

And I hope everyone has an allocation to bitcoin before this money flows in. The move is going to be huge.

Nick: What will all this institutional money do for the price of bitcoin?

Teeka: I recently told my Palm Beach Confidential subscribers that bitcoin will reach $25,000 next year. And I am very confident it will reach that point.

Some analysts at the conference project a bitcoin price of $300,000 by 2022. That’s not unreasonable.

So, my price may be on the conservative side.

Nick: Thank you for talking to us again, T. Have fun in Bogotá.

Teeka: No problem.


Justin’s note: As I mentioned, Teeka is one of the world’s leading crypto experts. He’s traveled the world and met with the top insiders to learn as much as he can about the booming crypto market.

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Teeka Tiwari on How "I Vastly Underestimated Bitcoin"

(most interesting parts): Institutional Demand, & coming Secure Custody

Nick: How’s that possible? You’ve been talking about the tidal wave of money coming into cryptos all year.

Teeka: It’s not going to be a tidal wave… It’s going to be the biggest ocean of money in the history of the world.

And that money hasn’t even hit the markets yet. The opportunity in cryptos is just beginning.

"That’s the biggest thing I noticed… the amount of institutional demand for cryptocurrencies that’s out there.

I vastly underestimated how badly institutions want to get into this space… vastly underestimated."

. . .

Right now there are no bitcoin “vaults” approved for institutional use.

The good news is that will change next year. A slew of new companies is rising up to meet the custody challenge.

Once custody is in place, the stage will be set for institutions to trade in the physical bitcoin market. And when that happens, billions—or even trillions—of dollars will be flowing into the space.

==

> see whole interview:  post #xx

 

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I've been following Michael Novogratz quite closely, he has an amazing instinct for trading/investing.  He bought ether at $1 and sold at $400, made about $250 million.  Gave half to charity and bought himself a jet!

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I think the bulls are squawking too loudly now... the bubble callers have acquiesced

A downturn is coming during Christmas

Wouldn't be surprised to see it drop to $3000-4000 sharpish

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I heard that there might be a fork today

The guy who told me, said it could be a buying opportunity.

We agreed the prices might start behaving differently now that there are futures

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6 hours ago, hector said:

I think the bulls are squawking too loudly now... the bubble callers have acquiesced

A downturn is coming during Christmas

Wouldn't be surprised to see it drop to $3000-4000 sharpish

It does seem very overheated, yet at the same time I cannot think of a more global accessible asset as bitcoin.  

Spencer Bogart who is a respected Wall Street bitcoin analyst said in a recent interview that ownership among institutional investors wasn't even at 1%. Retail ownership is at 2%.

I believe that bitcoin is not correlated with any other asset class therefore a small holding (low single digit %) might actually be quite attractive to these investors. Bubb what do you think?

 

 

(I'll try and find the interview)

 

Found it

 

 

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Bitcoin's Achilles heel is it's small block size. It cannot sustain the load of new owners all using it. And if you don't own your private keys then you don't really own bitcoin. This would make it very easy for governments to seize.

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5 hours ago, hector said:

Bitcoin's Achilles heel is it's small block size. It cannot sustain the load of new owners all using it. And if you don't own your private keys then you don't really own bitcoin. This would make it very easy for governments to seize.

Yeah and centralised exchanges are a weak point.  

Roger Ver and Craig Wright seem to think bitcoin cash will hit the big time next year.  I didn't sell any of those when I sold down my bitcoin this year.  Who knows, maybe bitcoin cash will eclipse bitcoin one day....

 

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On 12/2/2017 at 4:50 AM, Perishabull said:

 

 

It is possible we are witnessing and participating in something really different here, since the value of these networks isn't just determined just by supply and demand,but also network growth. Network growth creates network effects which perpetuates further growth. The growth of a network is defined by Metcalfe's law which I've posted about before, back in 2014 when discussing cryptocurrencies.

Normally you can predict tops in markets by looking at parabolic moves however this is different in the sense that;

 

  • These are brand new asset markets

 

 

In addition to this dynamic of Metcalfe's law we have an additional dynamic of reflexivity which I've posted about before. (http://www.greenenergyinvestors.com/index.php?showtopic=16736&p=256245)

 

So this means that when prices run way ahead of value as suggested by Metcalfe's law it may be a sell signal, and when prices are below it may be a buy signal.

Further reading;

 

Business Insider;

Analyst says 94% of bitcoin's price movement over the past 4 years can be explained by one equation

 

Zerohedge;

Gold, Bitcoin, And Metcalfe’s Law

Here are the billionaire Winklevoss brothers explaining how they believe that Bitcoin should be valued according to Metcalfe's law (from 4:10);

 

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Amazing chart showing correlation between transactions squared and marketcap for bitcoin. (Transaction volume used as proxy for number of users on network)

 

 

IMG_1324.PNG

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Lessons from the dot.com bubble;

 

CNN November 9 2000;

The $1.7 trillion dot.com lesson

 

Index of 280 Internet stocks is down $1.7 trillion from its 52-week high 
by Staff Writer David Kleinbard
  graphic
graphic  
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NEW YORK (CNNfn) - Call it the $1.755 trillion dot.com investing lesson.

It's hard to think of a publicly traded Internet company that is not down at least 75 percent from its 52-week high and that hasn't trimmed its expenses or laid off workers. While industry groups have always drifted in and out of favor on Wall Street, it's rare to see an industry evaporate as quickly and completely as Web stocks did.

CNNfn.com asked the market data and research firm Birinyi Associates of Westport, Conn., to calculate the market value of the 280 stocks in the Bloomberg US Internet Index at their respective 52-week highs and their current market value. The combined market values of the 280 stocks had fallen to $1.193 trillion currently from $2.948 trillion at their peak, a loss of $1.755 trillion, most of which occurred between March and September of this year.

The Bloomberg Internet Index contains Web retailers, Internet infrastructure firms, Web advertising companies, Web portals and makers of networking equipment. Some of the largest losses on a dollar-value basis came from networking equipment giant Cisco Systems (CSCO: Research, Estimates), which has lost $210 billion in market value from its peak; the Internet incubators CMGI(CMGI: Research, Estimates) and Internet Capital Group (ICGE: Research, Estimates), which have lost a combined $100 billion from their apex; the Web portal Yahoo! (YHOO: Research, Estimates), which shed $102 billion, and America Online (AOL: Research, Estimates), which is worth $92 billion less than at its highest point.

Of the 280 stocks in the index, 79 are down 90 percent or more from their 52-week high. Another 72 are down 80-89 percent. Only five are down less than 5 percent.

graphic"It's not a correction � it's a crash," said Fred Wilson, managing partner at Flatiron, a New York-based venture capital firm dedicated to investing in the digital economy.

The collapse of the Internet bubble, perhaps one of the largest financial fiascoes in U.S. history, came after a three-year period, starting in January 1997, when investors would buy almost anything even vaguely associated with the Internet, regardless of valuation. Investors ignored huge current losses and were willing to pay 100 times expected earnings in fiscal 2002. They were goaded by bullish reports from sell-side securities analysts� and market forecasts from IT research firms, such as IDC, Gartner and Forrester Research.

"The venture business is all about excess and then correction," said Steve Bengston, a managing director at PricewaterhouseCoopers in San Jose, Calif., who advises early-stage companies. "It's like disk drives in the 1980s, when venture capitalists funded 50 disk-drive makers when the world needed three."

"Stocks that skyrocketed north in a fashion never seen before will plummet south in a fashion never seen before either," Bengston added. "A lot of companies that don't have path to profitability or a leading position in their market will be shut down rather than receiving second or third rounds of funding."

"When there were not very many Internet companies, the supply of Internet companies to the market was small and the appetite for them was large," said Flatiron's Wilson. "Therefore, if you were in the business of creating Internet companies in 1996-98, you had a market that provided massive demand for that."

When public markets became glutted with new, money-losing Web companies in 1999, that picture changed rapidly. Venture funds are very reluctant to sink more money into struggling privately held Web companies that would be difficult to take public.

"All of us in the venture capital area are going through a triage, where we have to decide which portfolio companies are so wounded we will never save them," Wilson said. "As horrible as it is to go through that process, it's a cleansing process. To have some branches grow and bear fruit, you have to trim others."�
 
The boom in Internet IPOs

Most industry sector booms, such as the biotech bubble of 1991, feature a large volume of IPOs in the hot sector, with the highest quality companies being the first to go public and the quality of offerings degrading as the boom reaches its later stages. The Internet bubble was no exception to that trend. Yahoo!, considered to be one of the highest quality, most blue-chip Internet stocks, went public in April 1996, becoming one of the first to trade in public markets. Amazon.com (AMZN: Research, Estimates), the giant of Web retailing, went public in May 1997 � still early in the cycle.

According to the New York-based securities data firm Commscan, Web companies raised a total of $1 billion in 34 IPOs in 1997, rising to $2 billion in 45 deals in 1998, and then exploding to $24.1 billion in 292 IPOs in 1999. Investors who bought Web IPOs early in the cycle are still sitting on large gains. The combined market value of the 34 companies that went public that year is 330 percent higher than their offering prices, even after this year's Internet stock plunge, according to Commscan.
 
Each day more bad news

The collapse of the dot.com bubble has resulted in bad news about layoffs or losses being issued almost every day. On Nov. 7, for example, Pets.com (IPET: Research, Estimates), an online pet-supply retailer that had spent millions promoting its brand, decided to shut its doors and laid off roughly 255 of its 320 employees.

graphicOne day later, Internet Capital Group said that it plans to cut its staff by 35 percent and take a fourth-quarter charge of $25 million to $30 million in a move to strengthen its financial position.

ICG cut back its new investments in the third quarter to $120 million, from $417 million in the previous quarter. The announcement caused ICG's stock to plunge $5.06 to $11.19 Thursday; it's now down 95 percent from its 52-week high of $212.
 
Few turtles reach the sea

The high rates of consolidation and failure that Web companies are going through now is typical of many newly emerging industries throughout American economic history. Whenever a new technology comes along that has the potential to dramatically change the competitive landscape, hundreds of companies are formed to try to exploit that opportunity, including many with weak management or poorly thought out business plans. Intense competition ensues, returns on capital fall, and most of the new entrants either merge or go bankrupt.

The consolidation of the U.S. railroad industry in the 20th century shows this pattern. In 1929, there were 163 "Class I" railroads in the U.S. Today, there are seven Class I railroads remaining, and they carry more than 90 percent of the rail freight in the U.S., according to the Association of American Railroads in Washington, D.C. The Penn Central Railroad was formed from 600 previously independent railroads.

Merrill Lynch analyst Henry Blodget, one of the leading bulls on Web stocks, warned about a shakeout in the Internet industry in a 330-page report issued last June.

"As the shakeout continues, we continue to believe that the Internet spoils will go to the few, not the many," Blodget wrote. "As one investor we respect put it, anytime a new industry emerges, many turtles hatch, few make it to the sea."

There were about 300 public business-to-consumer Web companies trading last June, only five of which were profitable at that time. Blodget believes that in three years, only 15-20 will be profitable.
 
Failure at Internet speed

While high rates of consolidation and failure among Web stocks aren't at all surprising, the speed and severity of those failures has caught some investors off guard. Businesses that launched and operated at Internet speed have failed at Internet speed.

For example, the name-your-own-price Web discounter Priceline.com (PCLN: Research, Estimates) went from $94 per share to less than $4 per share within the space of eight months.� PaineWebber began coverage of Priceline last January with a "buy" rating and a 12-month price target of $95, saying that Priceline "is truly revolutionizing commerce as we know it, providing a way for sellers to dispose of unwanted product while maintaining the integrity of their existing price structures."

graphicEight months after that research note was issued, Priceline announced plans to close its gasoline and groceries operations, called WebHouse Club, after they burned through most of the $360 million they raised over the past two years. The grocery industry proved to be reluctant to eat the cost of discounts offered by WebHouse, forcing the new venture to subsidize the cost of its customers' groceries. �

Ironically, Priceline's revenue in the quarter ended Sept. 30 was 18 percent higher than PaineWebber had forecast it would be, and its operating loss was smaller than forecast. What had changed was investors' perceptions about the future growth of the company and the popularity of the name-your-own-price business model.�
 
The lessons learned

Web-based retailers and Web sites supported by advertising revenue have proven to be the two most failure-prone types of Internet business, and there are lessons to be learned from each segment.

Web retailers underestimated how much infrastructure they would have to build and how much logistics work they would need to do to duplicate traditional brick-and-mortar retailers. Companies that were supposed to be "virtual operations" ended up with warehouses and inventories almost as large as those of traditional retailers. Amazon.com (AMZN: Research, Estimates), for example, held about $164 million of inventory and had more than $350 million in property, plant and equipment as of Sept. 30.

"I don't see how Amazon is really a dot.com," said Anitesh Barua, an assistant professor at the University of Texas at Austin, who has done an extensive study of the Internet economy. "It's really a very traditional operation, and it's not Amazon's fault, since the publishers that supply Amazon can't operate in a virtual mode themselves."

"Dot.coms aren't good at logistics," Barua added. "How can they be? They have been in business for only three or four years."

In some cases, Web retailers have found that customer-acquisition costs were much higher than they anticipated. And, to make matters worse, traditional retailers have launched their own Web operations and proven to be formidable competitors.

"The legacy retailers are really waking up and going after the Net big time, so the competitive landscape has changed for the pure dot.com companies," said PricewaterhouseCoopers' Bengston. "Huge venture funds have been formed to help traditional companies create Web operations."

Finally, businesses that are narrow margin in the brick-and-mortar world, such as books and consumer electronics, have proven to be narrow margin on the Web too. Amazon had about $638 million in revenue in the quarter ended Sept. 30; after deducting its cost of goods sold, marketing and selling expense, and general and administrative expense, only about $3 million is left over.
 
Too many sites, too few advertisers

With the exception of about 15 major Web destinations, Web sites supported by advertising are fighting for their lives and, in many cases, losing. The IT research firm Jupiter Research estimates that $3.5 billion was spent on Web advertising in 1999, rising to $5.3 billion this year and expected to hit $7.3 billion in 2001. While that growth rate is much faster than competing forms of advertising, most of the advertising dollars are going to a few large sites, leaving thousands of smaller sites to starve.

According to Charles Buchwalter, vice president of media research at AdRelevance, an Internet advertising tracking firm, 80 sites comprise 80 percent of all the hosted advertising on the Web.

"There is a gradual move away from concentration, but the numbers still are really small," Buchwalter said. "The ebullience that many companies had 12 months ago has been disabused by now. Advertisers have found that branding plays a role and coming up with a business model in this new world is not a slam dunk."
 
A small part of the Internet economy

While the plunge of the roughly 300 publicly traded Internet companies has generated a substantial amount of press coverage, those companies and the layoffs they have made represent only a tiny percentage of the overall Internet economy. Most of the Internet economy consists of old-line industrial companies that are using the Web to trim billions of dollars in costs from their operations and better serve customers. It also includes networking equipment companies that have generated billions of dollars in profits selling the routers, hubs and switches needed to direct the exploding amount of traffic over the Internet.

"There is still a Gold Rush mentality out there, and the companies selling the pickaxes and dynamite are the ones who are consistently successful," said Matt Stamski, a senior analyst at Gomez Advisors in Lincoln, Mass., referring to the networking companies.

The Internet economy added 650,000 jobs in 1999 as revenues soared to over half a trillion dollars, according to the University of Texas at Austin's Center for Research in Electronic Commerce. The Internet economy now directly supports 2.476 million workers, more than the insurance, communications and public utilities industries

According to the human resources consulting firm Challenger Gray & Christmas Inc., some 22,267 dot.com job cuts have been announced since December 1999, when the firm began tracking such data. Of the 274 companies tracked from December 1999 through October 2000, 44 of them -- or 16 percent of the total -- have since failed. Still, people fired from dot.coms should have no problem finding another job, said John Challenger, the company's CEO.

graphic

"I think companies will spend billions of dollars over the next several years building their e-commerce structures, and these dot.com employees will be leaders in helping them do that," Challenger said.

"A handful of highly publicized dot.coms are failing," said the University of Texas' Barua. "They never employed that many people to begin with, so the displacement is quite small. Sure, it's unfortunate for the investors who lost money, and the people temporarily being laid off. Their dreams of becoming multi-millionaires overnight just got shattered."

"There are still an incredible number of opportunities that will get funded related to the Internet � they're just different," said PricewaterhouseCoopers' Bengston. "We're in the second inning of a nine-inning game. The Dells of the Internet business have not even been founded yet."

Still, risk-averse investors would be well advised to remember the turtles heading for the sea. graphic

Save a link to this article and return to it at www.savethis.comSave a link to this article and return to it at www.savethis.com  Email a link to this articleEmail a link to this article  Printer-friendly version of this articlePrinter-friendly version of this article  View a list of the most popular articles on our siteView a list of the most popular articles on our site  

 

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8 hours ago, Perishabull said:

Amazing chart showing correlation between transactions squared and marketcap for bitcoin. (Transaction volume used as proxy for number of users on network)

 

 

IMG_1324.PNG

 

Network transactionsto date;

2uEEE65.png

 

 

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This market is going to try to get everyone who cashed out early to pile back in like Isaac Newton. I ain't falling for it. Let the dumb money play with the whales.

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DARK JOURNALIST EXCLUSIVE NEW INTERVIEW WITH CATHERINE AUSTIN FITTS!

***
fittsmimi

The Bitcoin Op

NEW DARK JOURNALIST INTERVIEW WITH FORMER ASSISTANT HOUSING SECRETARY CATHERINE AUSTIN FITTS: THE BITCOIN OP & DIGITAL SLAVERY!

Cryptocurrency as a Tool - Digital Slavery - Deep State Control - Space Economy!

Members Log In Here for Bonus Content from this Interview >>

Become a Member of Dark Journalist Here >>

PART 2: HUMAN SOCIETY VS TRANSHUMANISM
In this fascinating episode Dark Journalist Daniel Liszt welcomes back Former Assistant Housing Secretary and Solari Report Publisher Catherine Austin Fitts for a deep and insightful look into the perils and possibilities of the digital age and what lies ahead.

THE BITCOIN OP
Catherine sees most of the upper level financial elites moving into buying Gold and Land while they entice the general population into an unstable Cryptocurrency. She outlines the danger of using digital money when the current system of finance has no integrity and that people who work with Bitcoin, Blockchain and Cryptocurrencies know it's unsafe and subject to hacking with FDIC insurance.

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BTS ... 12-mos

4CIi9b2.png

Bitcoin plunges below $11,000 in volatile trading on Coinbase as rout accelerates; now down 40 percent from record

Bitcoin plunges more than 40 percent from its all-time high reached Sunday, according to Coinbase.
Coinbase said a little after 11 a.m. New York time that buying and selling was temporarily disabled.
CME's bitcoin futures expiring in January reached 'limit down,' off 20 percent.
Stocks that have soared dramatically on speculation around their connection to bitcoin and its underlying blockchain technology also fall.

/ 2 /

Coinbase has Suspended All Buying and Selling of Bitcoin

Coinbase, one of the biggest bitcoin marketplaces in the U.S., said Friday that trading was temporarily disabled amid a price rout in cryptocurrencies.

/ 3 /

6 Possible Explanations Why Bitcoin And Cryptocurrency Prices Dropped So Low Yesterday

Until Dec. 22, the world of cryptocurrency felt positively 'to the moon.' It seemed like everywhere you looked, your favorite cryptocurrency was hitting new all-time highs with ease, breaking any barrier set before it.

In fact, according to data from OnChainFX (reported by Coindesk): in the past four days, all of the top-20 cryptocurrencies have hit all-time highs.

But yesterday, a steep drop-off in Bitcoin—falling as low as $12.5K—precipitated a drop off among essentially all other major cryptocurrencies.

 

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FED COIN?

Is this idea going to be pushed by the Government

 

NEWS AND VIEWS FROM THE NEFARIUM DEC 21 2017

 

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BITCOIN Knowledge Reboot for 2018

You won't be buying a cup of coffee with BTC anytime soon!

/ 1 /

Bitcoin pioneer, Roger Ver, does a great job here of explaining the basics of Bitcoins.

Did you know it costs about $10 to process a Bitcoin transaction,

but only 1 cent for Bitcoin cash? That's a huge difference

Bitcoin: How Does it Work? (Roger Ver Interview)

Bitcoin technology can change the way we vote & how we govern ourselves.

But not everyone thinks that way. If the governments gain control of the crypto markets (and why won't they?), it could lead to financial enslavement.

/ 2 /

"This is a Pump" (& Dump operation)

CATHERINE AUSTIN FITTS - BITCOIN OP DIGITAL SLAVERY & SPACE ECONOMY! DARK JOURNALIST

Published on Dec 13, 2017
Human Society vs Digital Slavery & Transhumanism

=====

FORK: 8-02-17 ===== : MktCap / 1-01-18 ===== : MktCap / +%chg.MC
BTC : $ 2,757  100.0% : $45.44B / $13,920 100.0% : $233.5B / +817.8%
ETH : $222.14 8.057% : $20.82B / $773.25 5.555% : $74.77B / +259.1%
BAC : $641.30 23.26% : $10.57B / $2,517.  18.08% : $42.52B / +302.3%
RPL : $0.1765  .0064% : $  8.77 B / $2.2500 .0162% : $86.98B / +891.2%
LTC : $042.93  1.557% : $  2.24 B / $232.53 1.670% : $12.69B / +466.5%
CRD : $000.00  00.00% : $00.00B / $0.7024 .0050% : $18.21B / infinite

====
> https://coinmarketcap.com/

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BIG DROPS!

 

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