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Pope Francis Rebooting our Economic Assumptions; Willing to resign

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Pope Francis's "Laudato Si" Message: Rebooting our Economic Assumptions

 

Pope's Encyclical : the plan is, a return to the Values of St Francis of Assisi

 

(I have combined two threads )

 

: St-Francis-2.jpg

 

TRUTH JIHAD: E. Michael Jones: Pope’s new vision threatens NWO

Posted by Kevin Barrett on July 1, 2015

Saving the environment from bankster technocracy

Does Pope Francis’s new “environmental encyclical” Laudato Si threaten the New World Order plan for technocratic tyranny? E. Michael Jones, America’s most provocative Catholic intellectual, thinks so. Jones says the techno-takeover of life in general (and sexuality in particular) has gone too far, and the Pope’s critique is fully justified – and a big step in the right direction. So it seems that conservative Catholic E. Michael Jones and liberal Jew Rabbi Michael Lerner are both giving the Pope’s encyclical a big thumbs up!

During this show we also offer conflicting views of the movie Avatar, discuss the Vatican-CIA-freemasonry organized crime ring exposed in Paul Williams’ Operation Gladio, and speculate about if and when the Pope will forge a traditional-values-based alliance with the Muslim world.

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Jones & Barrett at the New Horizons Conference in Tehran

 

> source: http://www.veteranstoday.com/2015/07/01/jones-pope/

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The Pope has rejected "the market as magic", says E. Michael Jones

 

Francis_zpsj3hureli.jpg

 

EXCERPT, from the Pope's letter:

 

Saint Francis of Assisi

10. I do not want to write this Encyclical without turning to that attractive and compelling figure, whose name I took as my guide and inspiration when I was elected Bishop of Rome. I believe that Saint Francis is the example par excellence of care for the vulnerable and of an integral ecology lived out joyfully and authentically. He is the patron saint of all who study and work in the area of ecology, and he is also much loved by non-Christians. He was particularly concerned for God’s creation and for the poor and outcast. He loved, and was deeply loved for his joy, his generous self-giving, his openheartedness. He was a mystic and a pilgrim who lived in simplicity and in wonderful harmony with God, with others, with nature and with himself. He shows us just how inseparable the bond is between concern for nature, justice for the poor, commitment to society, and interior peace.

11. Francis helps us to see that an integral ecology calls for openness to categories which transcend the language of mathematics and biology, and take us to the heart of what it is to be human. Just as happens when we fall in love with someone, whenever he would gaze at the sun, the moon or the smallest of animals, he burst into song, drawing all other creatures into his praise. He communed with all creation, even preaching to the flowers, inviting them “to praise the Lord, just as if they were endowed with reason”.[19] His response to the world around him was so much more than intellectual appreciation or economic calculus, for to him each and every creature was a sister united to him by bonds of affection. That is why he felt called to care for all that exists... The poverty and austerity of Saint Francis were no mere veneer of asceticism, but something much more radical: a refusal to turn reality into an object simply to be used and controlled.

12. What is more, Saint Francis, faithful to Scripture, invites us to see nature as a magnificent book in which God speaks to us and grants us a glimpse of his infinite beauty and goodness. “Through the greatness and the beauty of creatures one comes to know by analogy their maker” (Wis 13:5); indeed, “his eternal power and divinity have been made known through his works since the creation of the world” (Rom 1:20). For this reason, Francis asked that part of the friary garden always be left untouched, so that wild flowers and herbs could grow there, and those who saw them could raise their minds to God, the Creator of such beauty.[21]Rather than a problem to be solved, the world is a joyful mystery to be contemplated with gladness and praise.

My appeal

13. The urgent challenge to protect our common home includes a concern to bring the whole human family together to seek a sustainable and integral development, for we know that things can change. The Creator does not abandon us; he never forsakes his loving plan or repents of having created us. Humanity still has the ability to work together in building our common home. Here I want to recognize, encourage and thank all those striving in countless ways to guarantee the protection of the home which we share. Particular appreciation is owed to those who tirelessly seek to resolve the tragic effects of environmental degradation on the lives of the world’s poorest. Young people demand change. They wonder how anyone can claim to be building a better future without thinking of the environmental crisis and the sufferings of the excluded.

. . .

These problems are closely linked to a throwaway culture which affects the excluded just as it quickly reduces things to rubbish. To cite one example, most of the paper we produce is thrown away and not recycled. It is hard for us to accept that the way natural ecosystems work is exemplary: plants synthesize nutrients which feed herbivores; these in turn become food for carnivores, which produce significant quantities of organic waste which give rise to new generations of plants. But our industrial system, at the end of its cycle of production and consumption, has not developed the capacity to absorb and reuse waste and by-products. We have not yet managed to adopt a circular model of production capable of preserving resources for present and future generations

==

> Encyclical : http://w2.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/encyclicals/documents/papa-francesco_20150524_enciclica-laudato-si.html

REACTION:

 

“The Ecological Society of America commends Pope Francis for his insightful encyclical on the environment. Addressed to everyone on this planet, the letter issued on 18 June 2015 is an eloquent plea for responsible Earth stewardship. The pope is clearly informed by the science underpinning today’s environmental challenges. The encyclical deals directly with climate change, its potential effects on humanity and disproportionate consequences for the poor...

“Today’s environmental dilemmas require bold responses, and the pope suggests actions to sustain ecosystems at local to global scales. He sees the need for comprehensive solutions solidly grounded in understanding of nature and society. Because there is no single path to sustainability, he sees generating viable future scenarios as necessary to stimulate dialogue toward finding solutions. We concur.

==

> more: http://www.esa.org/esablog/ecology-in-the-news/esa-commends-pope-francis-for-encyclical-on-the-environment/

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Our World is Inequal, and structurally perverse

 

Global Inequality

 

50. Instead of resolving the problems of the poor and thinking of how the world can be different, some can only propose a reduction in the birth rate. At times, developing countries face forms of international pressure which make economic assistance contingent on certain policies of “reproductive health”. Yet “while it is true that an unequal distribution of the population and of available resources creates obstacles to development and a sustainable use of the environment, it must nonetheless be recognized that demographic growth is fully compatible with an integral and shared development”.[28] To blame population growth instead of extreme and selective consumerism on the part of some, is one way of refusing to face the issues. It is an attempt to legitimize the present model of distribution, where a minority believes that it has the right to consume in a way which can never be universalized, since the planet could not even contain the waste products of such consumption. Besides, we know that approximately a third of all food produced is discarded, and “whenever food is thrown out it is as if it were stolen from the table of the poor”.[29] Still, attention needs to be paid to imbalances in population density, on both national and global levels, since a rise in consumption would lead to complex regional situations, as a result of the interplay between problems linked to environmental pollution, transport, waste treatment, loss of resources and quality of life.

51. Inequity affects not only individuals but entire countries; it compels us to consider an ethics of international relations. A true “ecological debt” exists, particularly between the global north and south, connected to commercial imbalances with effects on the environment, and the disproportionate use of natural resources by certain countries over long periods of time. The export of raw materials to satisfy markets in the industrialized north has caused harm locally, as for example in mercury pollution in gold mining or sulphur dioxide pollution in copper mining. There is a pressing need to calculate the use of environmental space throughout the world for depositing gas residues which have been accumulating for two centuries and have created a situation which currently affects all the countries of the world. The warming caused by huge consumption on the part of some rich countries has repercussions on the poorest areas of the world, especially Africa, where a rise in temperature, together with drought, has proved devastating for farming. There is also the damage caused by the export of solid waste and toxic liquids to developing countries, and by the pollution produced by companies which operate in less developed countries in ways they could never do at home, in the countries in which they raise their capital: “We note that often the businesses which operate this way are multinationals. They do here what they would never do in developed countries or the so-called first world. Generally, after ceasing their activity and withdrawing, they leave behind great human and environmental liabilities such as unemployment, abandoned towns, the depletion of natural reserves, deforestation, the impoverishment of agriculture and local stock breeding, open pits, riven hills, polluted rivers and a handful of social works which are no longer sustainable”.[30]

52. The foreign debt of poor countries has become a way of controlling them, yet this is not the case where ecological debt is concerned. In different ways, developing countries, where the most important reserves of the biosphere are found, continue to fuel the development of richer countries at the cost of their own present and future. The land of the southern poor is rich and mostly unpolluted, yet access to ownership of goods and resources for meeting vital needs is inhibited by a system of commercial relations and ownership which is structurally perverse.

==

> Encyclical: http://w2.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/encyclicals/documents/papa-francesco_20150524_enciclica-laudato-si.html

Michael Jones discusses some similar issues

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III. THE MYSTERY OF THE UNIVERSE



76. In the Judaeo-Christian tradition, the word “creation” has a broader meaning than “nature”, for it has to do with God’s loving plan in which every creature has its own value and significance...



77. “By the word of the Lord the heavens were made” (Ps 33:6). This tells us that the world came about as the result of a decision, not from chaos or chance...



78. At the same time, Judaeo-Christian thought demythologized nature. While continuing to admire its grandeur and immensity, it no longer saw nature as divine. In doing so, it emphasizes all the more our human responsibility for nature. This rediscovery of nature can never be at the cost of the freedom and responsibility of human beings who, as part of the world, have the duty to cultivate their abilities in order to protect it and develop its potential. If we acknowledge the value and the fragility of nature and, at the same time, our God-given abilities, we can finally leave behind the modern myth of unlimited material progress. A fragile world, entrusted by God to human care, challenges us to devise intelligent ways of directing, developing and limiting our power.



79. In this universe, shaped by open and intercommunicating systems, we can discern countless forms of relationship and participation. This leads us to think of the whole as open to God’s transcendence, within which it develops. Faith allows us to interpret the meaning and the mysterious beauty of what is unfolding. We are free to apply our intelligence towards things evolving positively, or towards adding new ills, new causes of suffering and real setbacks. This is what makes for the excitement and drama of human history, in which freedom, growth, salvation and love can blossom, or lead towards decadence and mutual destruction. The work of the Church seeks not only to remind everyone of the duty to care for nature, but at the same time “she must above all protect mankind from self-destruction”.[47]


==


> Encyclical : http://w2.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/encyclicals/documents/papa-francesco_20150524_enciclica-laudato-si.html


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I'd only believe that the RCC is for the people when I see it divest itself of all its accumulated wealth to give to the poor

 

Plus make all the info in its library available to the public

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Is the Pope's Encyclical a breakthrough ??

 

I don't know if the Pope's message helped, but some folks are thinking in a new way.

Not the old: Pass the billions to your descendents plan.

 

Like this guy:

131119110929-t-twitter-prince-alwaleed-0

 

Saudi Arabian Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Alsaud -- who made billions investing in American, European and Middle Eastern companies -- is donating his $32 billion fortune to philanthropy, according to a statement released Wednesday.

Alwaleed said he wants his money to go to humanitarian causes after his death.

 

> more: http://money.cnn.com/2015/07/01/investing/saudi-prince-pledge-philanthropy/index.html

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COMPARISON with the 1%

 

The average family income for the Bottom 99% was $47,200 last year. The Top 1%, meanwhile, had an average income of $1.3 million. It took $423,000 just to get into the Top 1%.

150629125431-chart-income-growth-780x439

Looking longer term, 2014 also helped the 99% recover more of the losses they suffered during the Great Recession. These families have now made up slightly less than 40% of the declines suffered in the economic downturn.

The income of the 99% has risen 4.3% since the recession ended in 2009, compared to a 27.1% gain for the Top 1%.

While the income of the 99% may continue to grow if the economy remains strong, inequality may continue to widen.

 

> more: http://money.cnn.com/2015/06/29/news/economy/99-income/index.html?iid=EL

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Is the Pope's Encyclical a breakthrough ??

 

I don't know if the Pope's message helped, but some folks are thinking in a new way.

Not the old: Pass the billions to your descendents plan.

 

 

Saudi Arabian Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Alsaud -- who made billions investing in American, European and Middle Eastern companies -- is donating his $32 billion fortune to philanthropy, according to a statement released Wednesday.

Alwaleed said he wants his money to go to humanitarian causes after his death.

 

> more: http://money.cnn.com/2015/07/01/investing/saudi-prince-pledge-philanthropy/index.html

 

 

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

They always leave their wealth for 'humanitarian' causes just like all those tax-free foundations in the USA which in fact only serve to further the agenda of the Illuminati.........

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Same page?

Chris Hedges - The Pathology of The Super Rich

 

"We need to recover the language of class warfare.

The problem is not education... It is greed."

 

Some rich folks actual "get it" - But I am not sure Prince Alwaleed is one of them

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THE RICH Are Different? Are they really?

 

Hemingway and FS Fitzgerald debated this:

Fitzgerald%252520%252526%252520Hemingway

F Scott knew... Hemingway preferred to look the other way... (if it really happened at all)

 

Are they really different?

Almost certainly. Why else would they be interesting in something like pedophilia?

 

Here's why: They are possessed by demons, and driven to pass the possession on,

Or gain energy for their demons through an act of physical torture on small children.

I know, that this may sound crazy, But listen to David Icke

 

The David Icke Videcast: Possession Is A Myth?

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The Pope is right.

Our system has lost sight of the value of human life, and human dignity, esp. for poor people.

Time to reboot?

 

Top 10 Things You Need to Know about Pope Francis' Laudato Si'

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Is Pope Francis Calling Monsanto the Devil in Encyclical?

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He called for "bottom up" change, and now applauds the Pope's message

 

Carey Dialogues for Global Good: Eugene Linden

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LB61_ikUyr0

 

...writing in today's FT:

 

A Papal call to reconcile the Natural, Spiritual, and Industrial worlds - FT, pg. 9

 

"Free Market conservatives hate it, it fails to address the threat of overpopulation, and it dismisses carbon credits as a solution...

Nonetheless, it will ultimately be recognises as one of the most significant events in the modern environmental movement."

(It is) "a big step in towards healing the breach between western religion and nature.. that dates back to the dawn of monotheism"

=====

+ The present human-made climate crisis may lead to the sixth great extinction

+ "Moral space for exploiting nature" started in ancient Greece

+ The conclusion that humanity is intrinsically different from the rest of Nature appealed to early Christians (given that humans seemed so much more powerful than other creatures on this planet)

+ Some (St Francis?) believed that humans could talk to animals before the fall, and new research is showing that this is still possible, as we teach human language to chimpanzees. Attitudes are shifting, and chimpanzees are now thought (by some) to be worthy of persons rights

+ Recognizing that Nature is SACRED poses problems for our modern industrial society. Pope Francis says we must recognise that Sacred Nature, while balancing it with our own economov activity, and the plight of the poor.

 

"Pope Francis is trying to move the church" to a New Center

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TRUTH JIHAD: Pope Francis planning to resign! – Jesuit insider

 

Posted by Kevin Barrett on July 7, 2015

Daniel Sheehan says the Pope's commitment to reform includes his planned resignation

Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 1:00:01 — 54.9MB) | Embed

Subscribe: iTunes | Android | RSS

 

SHEEHAN_DANIEL.jpg

Daniel Sheehan, “The People’s Advocate,” personally litigated several of the most important cases of the 20th century, including the Pentagon Papers case, the Watergate burglary, the Karen Silkwood case, and the American Sanctuary Movement case on Central American death squads.

During his journey from Harvard Law to Harvard Divinity School, Sheehan developed an insider relationship with the highest levels of the Jesuit Order – which he says has become genuinely dedicated to reforming the church and saving the planet.

In this interview, Daniel Sheehan celebrates Pope Francis’s groundbreaking environmental encyclical Laudato Si, and calls on the Pope to revoke the Doctrine of Discovery, the 1493 proclamation that the New World “savages” were non-persons and their lands belonged to Christendom. He also unveils the biggest story ever broken on Truth Jihad Radio: Pope Francis is planning to resign in 2020 and become only the third Pope in history to have done so! Why? Listen and find out.

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TRUTH JIHAD: Pope Francis planning to resign! – Jesuit insider

 

Posted by Kevin Barrett on July 7, 2015

Daniel Sheehan says the Pope's commitment to reform includes his planned resignation

Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 1:00:01 — 54.9MB) | Embed

Subscribe: iTunes | Android | RSS

 

SHEEHAN_DANIEL.jpg

Daniel Sheehan, “The People’s Advocate,” personally litigated several of the most important cases of the 20th century, including the Pentagon Papers case, the Watergate burglary, the Karen Silkwood case, and the American Sanctuary Movement case on Central American death squads.

During his journey from Harvard Law to Harvard Divinity School, Sheehan developed an insider relationship with the highest levels of the Jesuit Order – which he says has become genuinely dedicated to reforming the church and saving the planet.

In this interview, Daniel Sheehan celebrates Pope Francis’s groundbreaking environmental encyclical Laudato Si, and calls on the Pope to revoke the Doctrine of Discovery, the 1493 proclamation that the New World “savages” were non-persons and their lands belonged to Christendom. He also unveils the biggest story ever broken on Truth Jihad Radio: Pope Francis is planning to resign in 2020 and become only the third Pope in history to have done so! Why? Listen and find out.

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I haven't had a chance to listen yet - I will soon

 

I have big respect for Danny Sheehan, and think that he is one of the really good guys on the planet.

He's already had some big achievements as a lawyer and humanitarian, and I think he is one of the people who may help to usher in a brighter future

 

There a thread about him in the Acore section:

http://www.greenenergyinvestors.com/index.php?showtopic=19536

 

Daniel Sheehan: Inching Closer to Disclosure

Published on Jun 25, 2015

Daniel Sheehan speaking at at Contact in the Desert 2015, Sunday 9-11am.

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I haven't had a chance to listen yet - I will soon

 

+ Sheehan thinks that the Pope should withdraw an ancient Papal Bull (decree) that gave Christian nations the right to takeover "discovered" territory in the Americas from the non-Christian natives who lived there

 

+ The Pope has reserved air time later this year (Dec 8th) to make a major announcement. Sheehan thinks he may declare a Jubilee Year, to extinquish debts

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And who authorised the Pope to grant such a decree?

Like he owns this planet or something?

 

Until the RCC divests itself of all its wealth to give to the planet, it's just another corrupt human institution - it has nothing whatsoever to do with the divine

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That was how it was seen in those days !

Imperial Rome never died, it just morphed into the Papacy,

with the Pope doing the bidding of rapacious rich families

 

More Notes:

==========

+ Sheehan thinks that the Pope should withdraw an ancient Papal Bull (decree) that gave Christian nations the right to takeover "discovered" territory in the Americas from the non-Christian natives who lived there. The pope "should" with draw that decree when he appears before Congress in September.

 

+ The Pope has reserved air time later this year (Dec 8th) to make a major announcement. Sheehan thinks he will declare a Jubilee Year, to extinquish debts

 

+ The legal fiction of making a corporation "a person", and absolving shareholders of legal liability, must be looked it. "We've go to deprive them of that."

The law has been in place only since 1868, and was put there to protect Robber Barons. (Right! Let's start with Monsanto's directors)

 

+ The pope has told fellow Jesuits that he will resign (at 80 years). "He wants to demonstrate that even he..." (the Pope) will accept the need to retire at 80

 

+ The person who got the second highest number of votes in the last conclave was Sean O'Malley

"He's a saint... he's the one who dropped the hammer on the pedophile priest in Boston."

"He is the best friend of Francis" and holds a key position in the kitchen cabinet

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Sheehan sees Sean O'Malley, an American, as a possible next pope (in 2020?):

 

Cardinal Sean O'Malley: The quiet Capuchin contender

 

There is something about the simple, austere life of a Capuchin friar that appeals to both Catholic clergy, and the Catholic world at large, and Cardinal Sean O'Malley has become the embodiment of that pure character in the run-up to the papal election.

 

That character, in combination with his proven track record of grassroots-level outreach, and his firm handling of subordinate clergy in the sexual abuse scandal, has made O'Malley one of the most talked-about names among all the "papabili" -- or papal candidates.

 

O'Malley, 68, became the Archbishop of Boston in 2003, and three years later was elevated to cardinal status by Pope Benedict XVI. It was the years he spent long before that, however, as a young pastor and Franciscan friar, which likely shaped his humble image.

 

As Inside the Vatican magazine editor and CBS News contributor Delia Gallagher notes, O'Malley has developed a chorus of supporters for his simplicity, seen as an antidote to the complicated politics and power plays of Vatican governance and for his practical approach to Church problems, such as selling off the cardinal's residence in Boston to pay settlements to victims of sexual abuse.

He even used the simple brown robes worn by the Capuchins, his order of friars, as his defining trait in his own humble rejection of the very notion he could ever be elected pope.

 

"I have worn this uniform for over 40 years," he said, "and I presume I will wear it till I will die because I don't expect to be elected pope."

 

The Catholic News Service's reporter John Allen said O'Malley is viewed as the "least American" of the U.S. cardinals in the running for the job of pontiff, a reference to his mild personal nature, his extensive experience abroad, and his mastery of the Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and Italian languages.

==

> http://www.cbsnews.com/news/cardinal-sean-omalley-the-quiet-capuchin-contender/

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Cardinal O'Malley on Pope Francis' First Year

 

. . .

 

World Over - 2014-02-013 - Sean Cardinal O'Malley Exclusive with Raymond Arroyo

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