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drbubb

Greece to leave Euro... Eventually

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Reducing public worked by 50k won't reduce the debt. It will help reduce (but not eliminate) the deficiit. A very big difference.

From what I read most of them will get 60% pay for 1-2 years and will then simply cost social security or pension payments. So, it sounds "good", but doesn't do that much anyway.

 

I think Greece needs to do a 100% default and then self-determine how they want to re-invent themselves. Certainly the state apparatus seems to need to shrink, but doing this now in one step leads to exactly what we're observing.

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It's Argentina, the cheeky bu**ers are trying to take our islands again (which they never lived on, and we have been on for nearly 200 years) :rolleyes:

 

Let them have it. I dont own it neither do you. Who are us. Its a craggy group of little islands near Argentina. But I forget there may be alot of energy resources there. Dont be a little Englander, or Scottish loyalist. Many of the worlds problems are a result of modern day colonialism through western Central Banks taking over Iraq, Libya to name but a few. Dont be a part of the problem be a part of the solution.

 

On a more serious note, who the f*ck is Sean Penn, chipping in on the 'Malvinas'??

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Think you misunderstand me monsieur, they did the right thing to default and i have quoted the Argies as an example on here before as proof that things are not so dire from going down that route and that is what Greece should do, but my point is they could have done it better. Coz they couldnt get money from the international markets they seized money from domestic pension funds. :blink:

 

Mais oui! Je suis tres desolate old boy, hindsight is indeed a wonderful thing :D .

 

PS Douche, have you put together that thread on your renting nightmare yet?

 

On a more serious note, who the f*ck is Sean Penn, chipping in on the 'Malvinas'??

 

Who? The actor in that film with the Ronrey bloke in N.Korea? :unsure:

 

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It's Argentina, the cheeky bu**ers are trying to take our islands again (which they never lived on, and we have been on for nearly 200 years) :rolleyes:

 

Let them have it. I dont own it neither do you. Who are us. Its a craggy group of little islands near Argentina. But I forget there may be alot of energy resources there. Dont be a little Englander, or Scottish loyalist. Many of the worlds problems are a result of modern day colonialism through western Central Banks taking over Iraq, Libya to name but a few. Dont be a part of the problem be a part of the solution.

 

The 82 conflict had nothing to do with resources.

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[[url="http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/features/4135473/The-flag-is-mightier-than-the-

 

He added: "It's up to the islanders not actors to decide their future."

 

Tory MP and ex-Army officer Patrick Mercer said: "What on earth has this got to do with Sean Penn?

 

"He's neither British nor Argentine and seems to know nothing about the situation judging by this moronic statement."

 

Edit: Doesnt feel right using The Sun as a reference....

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Some think unavoidability of a default could come by Monday already if the finance ministers don't like what they're told. And apparently the Troika really did not like what they saw.

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Some think unavoidability of a default could come by Monday already if the finance ministers don't like what they're told. And apparently the Troika really did not like what they saw.

 

I cant believe Germany actually want to 'lend' money to Greece now they can see the black hole it is. I think they fancy their chances of a managed default

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Berlin split on Greek bail-out

 

High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@ft.com to buy additional rights. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/92026aea-58cb-11e1-b118-00144feabdc0.html#ixzz1meMi2J5A

 

 

A split has emerged in the German government over whether to grant Greece a second bail-out package with Wolfgang Schäuble, finance minister, pushing to let Athens default while Chancellor Angela Merkel is firmly against, according to German and eurozone officials.

 

Mr Schäuble was said to have come to his hardline view in the light of haggling over Greece’s fresh austerity measures under a second rescue programme and the refusal of some Greek politicians to promise to back the deal after elections due in April.

 

High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@ft.com to buy additional rights. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/92026aea-58cb-11e1-b118-00144feabdc0.html#ixzz1meMncNKS

 

 

Schäuble doesn’t think the Greeks can deliver any more,” said one official in Ms Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union, adding that the minister was worried about putting more of German taxpayers’ money into a second bail-out.

 

A chancellery official stressed that Ms Merkel and Mr Schäuble were united in their goal of getting Greece to sign up to eurozone demands before approving the package. But he also conceded that the finance minister was “showing more impatience” than the chancellor. The finance ministry could not be reached for comment.

 

Mr Schäuble has angered the Greeks in recent days – and caused much head-scratching in Berlin – with public calls for Greece to postpone April elections and to install instead a technocratic government similar to that formed by Mario Monti in Italy.

 

 

Please visit site to read more.

 

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/92026aea-58cb-11e1-b118-00144feabdc0.html#axzz1meMcGHj4

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Berlin split on Greek bail-out

 

High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@ft.com to buy additional rights. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/92026aea-58cb-11e1-b118-00144feabdc0.html#ixzz1meMi2J5A

 

 

A split has emerged in the German government over whether to grant Greece a second bail-out package with Wolfgang Schäuble, finance minister, pushing to let Athens default while Chancellor Angela Merkel is firmly against, according to German and eurozone officials.

 

Mr Schäuble was said to have come to his hardline view in the light of haggling over Greece’s fresh austerity measures under a second rescue programme and the refusal of some Greek politicians to promise to back the deal after elections due in April.

 

High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@ft.com to buy additional rights. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/92026aea-58cb-11e1-b118-00144feabdc0.html#ixzz1meMncNKS

 

 

Schäuble doesn’t think the Greeks can deliver any more,” said one official in Ms Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union, adding that the minister was worried about putting more of German taxpayers’ money into a second bail-out.

 

A chancellery official stressed that Ms Merkel and Mr Schäuble were united in their goal of getting Greece to sign up to eurozone demands before approving the package. But he also conceded that the finance minister was “showing more impatience” than the chancellor. The finance ministry could not be reached for comment.

 

Mr Schäuble has angered the Greeks in recent days – and caused much head-scratching in Berlin – with public calls for Greece to postpone April elections and to install instead a technocratic government similar to that formed by Mario Monti in Italy.

 

 

Please visit site to read more.

 

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/92026aea-58cb-11e1-b118-00144feabdc0.html#axzz1meMcGHj4

 

Halight you are amazing.

Not only do you infringe the FT's copyright, but you also include two of their warnings about it!

Let us hope admin get here before trigger-happy Invision after receiving a complaint.

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Halight you are amazing.

Not only do you infringe the FT's copyright, but you also include two of their warnings about it!

Let us hope admin get here before trigger-happy Invision after receiving a complaint.

 

 

Sorry,

Dr B please deleate any of my posts taht you think infringe anybodys copyright

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Staring into the abyss: Inside a despairing Greek nation where families queue at soup kitchens and women threaten to jump to their deaths as job losses mount

 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2102864/Staring-abyss-Faced-losing-job-Greek-woman-threatens-jump-death-desperate-despairing-nation-hungry-families-queuing-soup-kitchens.html#ixzz1mkWEttj2

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Greek cabinet tackles austerity, rescue hopes rise

 

(Reuters) - Greece's cabinet tackled on Saturday how to implement austerity demanded by the EU and IMF as a 130-billion-euro ($171-billion) rescue seemed within reach, while the euro zone considered modifying a deal with private creditors to help Athens reduce its huge debts.

 

 

Link http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/18/us-greece-idUSTRE8120HI20120218

 

 

 

 

 

Looks likle the deal is on again, Howw long before we hear there are problems again ?

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I've watched the riots etc in Greece, but to be honest, they seem quite piddley, even compared to the recent UK riots.

 

Really, I would have expected millions of people out on the streets?

 

Each time Greek riots are shown, there are only a relatively small number of protestors.

 

Anyone know why?

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I've watched the riots etc in Greece, but to be honest, they seem quite piddley, even compared to the recent UK riots.

 

Really, I would have expected millions of people out on the streets?

 

Each time Greek riots are shown, there are only a relatively small number of protestors.

 

Anyone know why?

Perhaps the philosophical traditions of Stoicism and Epicureanism are alive and well? When Greece fell last time, they resorted to these other-worldy consolations. :rolleyes:

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Perhaps the philosophical traditions of Stoicism and Epicureanism are alive and well? When Greece fell last time, they resorted to these other-worldy consolations. :rolleyes:

 

One can but hope :D

 

Oh, and I see Fitch is saying Iceland is now safe to lend to again. 3 years since default.

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Sorry,

Dr B please deleate any of my posts taht you think infringe anybodys copyright

That could take weeks -

Google has already pulled Google Ads from here, since they have spotted a potential problem in that regard

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I've watched the riots etc in Greece, but to be honest, they seem quite piddley, even compared to the recent UK riots.

Really, I would have expected millions of people out on the streets?

Each time Greek riots are shown, there are only a relatively small number of protestors.

Anyone know why?

They are not paid to protest, and cannot retire from it with a pension at 50.

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I've watched the riots etc in Greece, but to be honest, they seem quite piddley, even compared to the recent UK riots.

 

Really, I would have expected millions of people out on the streets?

 

Each time Greek riots are shown, there are only a relatively small number of protestors.

 

Anyone know why?

 

Yes John. The 'protesters' are roped together with a guy each end of the rope. The pulling back and forth is supposed to generate excitement.

The method was pioneered by the BBC for Top of the Pops.

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That could take weeks -

Google has already pulled Google Ads from here, since they have spotted a potential problem in that regard

 

 

How about jsut deleateing all of my posts on block ? Thatway anything that iv posted will be gone. End of the trouble then?

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Yes John. The 'protesters' are roped together with a guy each end of the rope. The pulling back and forth is supposed to generate excitement.

The method was pioneered by the BBC for Top of the Pops.

 

Ah, that's genius :D

 

But really, I would expect hundreds of thousands* if not millions to be out protesting (if not rioting)?

 

 

 

 

*people, not the little sweet things that go on cakes and ice creams etc ;)

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