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Mr. Choi, a Macau tinkerer has the BEST sound

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Mr. Choi hates silicon. Hifi fans will love him.

Has a Macau tinkerer developed the best sound system?

=================================================

 

GEI Hifi enthusiasts take note. Music can sound better than you imagined. But you may have to visit Macau to hear a "state of the art" Hifi sound. This "new" Hifi system comes with a decidely "retro" look - Vacuum tubes reign supreme for the true audiophile on a pilgrimage to Macau.

 

choishelfsm.jpg

 

Less than 10 minutes walk from the ruins of St Paul near the foor of a hill in central Macau is a mecca for sound enthusiasts. I wonder if they will ever find it. We only found it by accident. After enjoying a wonderful French Meal at Jack's kitchen, a place that serendipity had brought us to, I asked the girlfriend, "What would it be like to live around here? Shall we have a look?"

 

I was drawn to the area since it has a sort of rundown historical grandeur to it. The restaurant resides just below one of the highest points in Macau, a fortress complete with cannons, providing an unnecessary physical defense of the magnificently renovated Macau Museum. In the immediately area, you can view and explore about three dozen of best historical two and three story colonial buildings in Asia.

 

Macau has been spared the rampant development that his removed almost everything of historical interest in Hong Kong, its sister colony. Some say that the preservation can be attributed to Macau's stronger respect for history. But others mainly in Hong Kong will tell you it was just a long period where Macau lacked sufficient capital to rebuild. Whatever the reason, the economics of tourism have changed rapidly in the past decade, as the Macau reinvented itself as a gambling Mecca. The crumbling buildings that I saw on my first visit to Macau about 25 years ago, are now all restored, thanks to a World Heritage designation and a 2009 grant from the government.

 

The area is called St Lazarus, and it is now attracting working artists. There are schools for the arts and music, both state supported and private. Several new galleries and restaurants are opening up every year. And the artists are thriving in Macau in a way that would seem out of place on Hong Kong island, where rising rents have pushed artists further and further away from the mainstream places frequented by tourists and moderately adventurous expats like myself. Macau seems much happier to lend support and even precious space to its artists. Perhaps they recognise that history and the creative arts will give Macau and appeal beyond what is offered by its glittering new gambling palaces. Tourists may recall with fondness the art and history they discover even when they fail to win at the gambling tables.

 

jackskitchen.jpg

Good Food : Next to Good Music

Our new friend Jack, the cheerful chef from Alsace agreed with us that life in Macau was not just about making money. "I can only eat so many beefsteaks everyday," he said, after serving us up a delicious meal of carrot soup, salad, and spare ribs in his charm-filled corner restaurant. Jack's French Kitchen is about celebrate its first year. We were the only diners at his restaurant on a quiet afternoon just before Christmas, so he and his friendly Macanese chinese wife were willing to answer the many questions we peppered them with. We learned that they had both been avid travelers. Before settling down in Macau to raise two daughters, Jack had climbed Mt Everest and visited 72 countries. When not traveling, his fulltime job had been working as an engineer on cars (a "mechanic", we would say in America.) Not wanting to compete with so many willing hands in Macau - a place where motor bikes far outnumber cars - he decided to distinguish himself as a chef. Rather than experimenting with woks, he recognised the novelty of his French background. He put himself through a one year training programme and then opened his own restaurant. The food was delicious, and we found it easy to believe that his place was full every night, as he told us it was. He had done little or no advertising, relying on word of mouth to build his clientel, and we felt the urge to be the latest couple to pass on the news of our discovery.

 

Jack's Kitchen,

at 36 Estrada Do Repouso Macau / (Address may not be precise)

Phone: 2875-8089 / 6685-1844, for reservations to avoid disappointment.

( email: arnchoi@gmail.com )

 

"This area has potential..."

After finishing the meal off with one of the best chocolate tarts I have ever had, we decided to explore one of the side streets. Around the corner, we saw a small and typical Macanese courtyard, which was filled with motor scooters. We looked up and down at the flats, thinking that there was a sort of vaguely Parsienne look to the place, but not without Macau's usual benign neglect of painting or renovation. "This area has potential to be a very nice place to live," I pronounced, but I wondered how long it might take to realise it, since the money seems to be flowing first into other newer neighborhoods, such as Taipa and the Cotai strip.

 

Then I saw a strange looking shop window off to one side. "What are they selling there? Antiques, or Perfume?" I asked my partner, as I walked past her for a better look.

 

choiwindowsm.jpg

 

As we got closer the apparent perfume bottles dissolved into vacuum tubes. What goes on here?, I wondered. Behind a velvet curtain we could see a man sitting on a sofa. He appeared to be sleeping. We tapped on the glass, and he turned to face us. A round and fully-alert face turned to stare back at us. He had been lost in an opera aria radiating from huge speakers across the room.

 

As he gestured us into the shop, it didn't take me long to work out that he spoke no English. Across the room was an altar to sound.

 

Not yet fashionable enough to attract foreign capital, and cosmopolitan residents...

 

(More coming about Mr Choi's fanastic amplifiers at HK$4,000 - HK$20,000.

Seems expensive - but the exquisite sound makes me think they are worth it.)

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20090508_761cbf17cd62c74d0508pBtJ17sSkEKH.jpg

 

May 18, 2009

 

The Macau government is hoping a program aimed at beautify the streets within the city`s UNSECO World Heritage precinct will encourage property owners to revamp their rundown buildings.

 

The three-year program, which includes repainting building facades, planting trees, improving lighting and repaving, is aimed at strengthening Macau`s image as a tourist destination.

 

A spokesman from Macau`s Land, Public Works and Transport Bureau (DSSOPT) told MacauNews the program was devised as an example of what could be achieved if more people took an active interest in building maintenance.

 

There are many areas in the city where buildings have been neglected for decades by their owners.

 

The tourist sightseeing path that leads from Ma Kok Temple to Dom Pedro V Theatre and through to the old town district is being targeted under the scheme.

 

St Lazarus church video (with Cantonese narration)

 

Many of the buildings in the heritage precinct are privately owned and the government is powerless to make owners maintain their buildings.

 

The first phase of work in the St Lazarus area included 36 buildings in five different streets.

 

As part of the plan the government is also offering residents access to an interest-free loan scheme for building works.

 

"It is anticipated that property owners would soon understand that if the property is well maintained, it will not only improve the living quality, but will also increase the property value," the spokesman said.

 

"The purpose of the facade renewal plan is to let the community neighbourhoods and property owners realise the importance of building maintenance."

 

The program is also designed to provide construction jobs during the economic slowdown.

 

The spokesman said parking spaces in some streets would be reviewed and new street signs would be installed directing people to heritage sites.

 

"It is anticipated the project will strengthen the image of Macau as a destination for cultural tourism," he said. "It will also improve the quality of the community environment."

 

/link: http://www.uomacau.com/en-us/hotel/detail/2059?position_id=33&thread=1602

 

/More: http://www.uomacau.com/en-us/entertainment/detail/960?position_id=33&thread=1017

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Great Expectations - Feb. 2009

 

great_expectations_01.jpg

 

The Old Ladies’ House transformed into the creative space of “Albergue” for the sake of Creative Industries in Macau.

 

In the presence of Chief Executive Edmund Ho, the renovated Old Ladies’ House was officially inaugurated into the creative space of “Albergue” on the 22nd of January this year. Composed of a series of “100% Designed in Macau” product exhibitions, and fashion and video shows, the event was a landmark on the cultural scene of Macau because of its formal nature. Guided by the intention to develop a Creative Industry in Macau, government officials were invited to witness the work of Macau’s creative talents, showcased under the unique frame and history of the famous Old Ladies’ House of Macau.

 

Property of Santa Casa da Misericordia, the Old Ladies’ House was originally a refuge for the homeless. In fact, the whole district of St Lazarus Church was a place where leper patients gathered. Since 2000, after the relocation of its residents to a more suitable retirement house, the Old Ladies’ House has undergone different phases of change. After the brief stay of the local artist’s association Communa de Pedra, the whole house was renovated in 2003 under the directive of Santa Casa da Misericordia. It was at this time that architect Carlos Marreiros was called upon, not only to physically renovate the place, but more importantly, to design a series of cultural contents to be fitted inside.

 

In fact, according to Marreiros, the efforts to activate the St. Lazarus district as a cultural area debuted 20 years ago when Mr. Francisco Figueira suggested that in order to better preserve the area, there should be renovations on the economic housings built by the Santa Casa da Misericordia.

 

“At that time we were not thinking about Creative Industries at all. But many people instinctively felt that this area should be preserved and be active again,” Marreiros says. During the 1990’s, several propositions were presented by the University of Macau and later by the Polytechnic Institute of Macau to the government, concerning installation projects of workshops and students in this area.

 

“But the timing was not yet mature, ” Marreiros explains. It was not until two years ago that the government started to consider the notion of Creative Industries as a potent project for the St. Lazarus area and for Macau in general”.

. . .

“There are four main areas we would like to concentrate on”, says Carlos Marreiros. “Culture, Community, Visual Arts and Creative Industries are our fields of activities.”

 

As Marreiros continues to explain, on a cultural perspective, Macau urgently needs its own cultural identity, which will counter-balance the overwhelming reputation of its casino city image.

 

“The architecture of the city is important to form the outer-shape of the city. But then, if they should be left empty without any contents, that would be as if we are without soul.”

 

/more: http://www.macaucloser.com/older_issues/MacauCLOSER_Site_february_2009/great_expectations.html

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I am intrigued to hear more about Mr Choi's magic amps!

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Mr. Choi hates silicon. Hifi fans will love him.

Has a Macau tinkerer developed the best sound system?

=================================================

 

GEI Hifi enthusiasts take note. Music can sound better than you imagined...

 

(continues)

Then I saw a strange looking shop window off to one side. "What are they selling there? Antiques, or Perfume?" I asked my partner, as I walked past her for a better look.

 

choiwindowsm.jpg

 

As we got closer the apparent perfume bottles dissolved into vacuum tubes. What goes on here?, I wondered. Behind a velvet curtain we could see a man sitting on a sofa. He appeared to be sleeping. We tapped on the glass, and he turned to face us. A round and fully-alert face turned to stare back at us. He had been lost in an opera aria radiating from huge speakers across the room.

 

As he gestured us into the shop, it didn't take me long to work out that he spoke no English. Across the room was an altar to sound. I gazed at it, in admiration of the obvious care that had been taken in putting it together.

 

"Does he make those?" I said gesturing to the shiny apparatus with the glass tubes protruding. My partner confirmed he did, and My Choi stood there glowing pride, with his peaked eyebrows lending an owlish demeanor to his smile.

 

He went on to explain something about what we are looking at. My explanations are filtered through the translations I received. Mr Choi is a sound fanatic. He has always been interested in music, and for decades had been trying to get a perfect sound. The amps that we were admiring were his own creation. He has spent over HK $1.5 million (that's about US$200,000) developing these systems. He isn't rich. The way he would do it was to build a system, and then sell it off, to get enough money to cover his expenses and build his next system.

 

"This one costs $10,000", he said in Cantonese, lifting one of the largest systems and connecting it to the speakers. He then reached over and pulled out a CD. Another opera aria. As the voice filled the speakers I felt a tingling sensation the music floated out and surrounded us with a very pure sound. We felt as if we were in the front row of a glorious concert.

 

My girl friend got excited, "Maybe I can help him sell these?" she said.

 

My response was very business-like. "Ask him who his customers are, and how he finds them. Oh, how many can he build each year?"

 

It turns out that he relies on word of mouth. People find him through friends and friends of friends. Most of his customers are either from Macau, Hong Kong, or China. But some of his systems go overseas, but he is not sure how. He would be pleased to have more business, but there are limits. He cannot build more than about two systems per month.

 

He offered us one of the smaller ones (see photo.) It had only four large tubes, with an animated blue light in the middle, tracking the sound volume. For HK$4,000 we could get the amplifier with two speakers and the connecting cables. He showed us the cables, and explained they they alone were worth almost HK$1,000 (? Did we get that right? Is it possible? Or did he mean the cables and the speaker.)

 

With the beautiful sound surrounding us, I have to admit that I was very tempted. Perhaps I will pick up a system on my next visit to Macau. I can reward myself for a good few weeks of stock trading, if I indeed have that.

 

(More photos may follow soon)

 

/The area - Not yet fashionable enough to attract foreign capital, and cosmopolitan residents...

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What a great story! Thanks for the details.

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Great story, you should try and publish it in a Hifi magazine. I would love to hear this guy's equipment. I'm a bit of an audio geek but only when it comes to portable stuff. If something can bring you enjoyment every day for years on end, I don't see a problem with spending large amounts of money on it.

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As a former owner of a Leak Stereo 20 (details HERE) with Varislope Streo pre-amp (here), I can confirm that these things sound absolutely amazing (obviously if coupled with decent speakers and sound source). The glow from those valves also looks so pretty at night. These things are LOUD. The stereo separation and magnificent sound reproduction totally blew away any other sound system I've had before or since. By a wide margin. You just have to hear these things to understand.

 

Be warned though, they're heavy, they get hot, they have fragile components and need quite regular maintenance. High quality replacement parts (particularly valves, but occasionally the *huge* capacitors) can be hard to find. Experience with a soldering iron is almost a prerequisite. Not the sort of thing to have casually lying around if you have inquisitive youngsters running amok.

 

EOTW cranks will love them; they'll probably survive a massive EMP from a high-altitude airburst nuclear device unscathed. You *need* faithfully-reproduced high-fidelity tunes when you're sitting in your bunker.

 

Mine was obtained (for free) from a friend having a clear-out. When I became a parent I really had to de-clutter and donated it for free to an audiophile friend (I was happy to give it away free to a good home).

 

Sure do miss that bad-boy.

 

EDIT:

We felt as if we were in the front row of a glorious concert

Yep, that's exactly the sensation these things give you. Couldn't put it better myself.

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Mr Choi's own photos

 

These shots... show the craftsmanship of the West Audio AMPS

 

choisets2a.jpg

 

I am trying to get them in color

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Here we go... in color this time (I tweaked the settings on my scanner)

 

Choi-2

choicolor2b.png

 

Choi-3

choicolor3b.png

 

I am also trying to piece together Choi-1a & 1b - the underside of the chassis

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Here's the underside

choicolorusm.png

 

It takes quite a few Valves and Capacitors to make this baby work

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Id love to hear a great system with valve amps and turntable. I plan to get a new turntable at some point. Im thinking of an SME model 10, 309 arm and im not sure about the cartridge but maybe a Denon one. Anyone got an opinion on this?

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I'm back in Macau - and hope to have another visit to Mr Choi's shop

 

Will the sound be as "amazing" on second hearing ?

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Here we go... in color this time (I tweaked the settings on my scanner)

 

Choi-2

choicolor2b.png

 

Choi-3

choicolor3b.png

 

I am also trying to piece together Choi-1a & 1b - the underside of the chassis

 

I am ashamed to admit the effect those pics is having on me! :D

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I'm back in Macau - and hope to have another visit to Mr Choi's shop

 

Will the sound be as "amazing" on second hearing ?

 

I was speaking to this old chap about amplifier design in the local high end hifi shop. He didnt like valves as he said there is too many compromises with them. He says that they have a limited lifespan and are micro phonic. He designs amplifiers and works with a brand called Heed. He reckons solid state is better but Id like to head a great valve system with turntable and electrostatic speakers. It would be the opposite of my solid state amps and dynamic speaker with digital source.

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I am ashamed to admit the effect those pics is having on me! :D

Yeah.

The care he took in the design of the visual look, was also taken in "designing the sound" that comes out of them.

 

In the back of my mind, I have an idea about maybe licensing his design, and trying to manufacture some sets in Hong Kong. Before doing that, I would want to find out if others are as enthusiastic as I was after hearing his systems.

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Yeah.

The care he took in the design of the visual look, was also taken in "designing the sound" that comes out of them.

 

In the back of my mind, I have an idea about maybe licensing his design, and trying to manufacture some sets in Hong Kong. Before doing that, I would want to find out if others are as enthusiastic as I was after hearing his systems.

Have you got a decent system already then Bubbs? If so, what have you got and what sort of music do you like to listen to?

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Hi-Fi is an interesting market - the low end is dominated by 'ease of purchase' and the high end is dominated by brand image. It is quite difficult to break into.

 

I had some 'friends of friends' at college who designed an external digital-to-analogue converter for CD players (in the late 80s when this was novel) - they had a fantastic system that sounded great at a bargain price - but it failed to sell. They consulted a marketing expert who told them to put it in a pretty box and charge 10x the price - it went on to sell in larger numbers than before. The brand was established as 'high end' and product sold.

 

The Valve amp market is fairly small and there are quite a few players. Only a low proportion of people want anything more than a budget compact, and of those few, some might like a valve amp but couldn't live with the inconveniences (warm-up time, valve replacement, the difficulty in matching speakers, etc). Furthermore, you can buy valve amps at the HK$4-10000 mark - they might not be excellent but will give a 'valve sound' albeit potentially with valve nasties such as hum, weird harmonics or poor frequency response. Your amps might be superior but to your punter they are equally risky propositions.

 

You have to understand fully how much design is in these units - there aren't that many ways to electronically design a valve amplifier... I've got a book called 'Mullard circuits for audio amplifiers' published in 1959 in-front of me and I dare say that the basic circuit design is the same for these amplifiers. This said, there are benefits to be made with using quality (and massive) capacitors in the power supply and quality windings in the output transformers, and there is substantial design in the correct choice of wires, valves, transformers, capacitors, etc.

 

The underside circuitry is very reminiscent of those old Mullard amplifiers (and all valve amps of that era) - and while there isn't anything particularly wrong with that approach it does make it more difficult to increase production volume. It is also a nightmare to do quality checks during manufacture.

 

The amps certainly are very pretty, but it is a classic valve look (wood cheeks, shiny surfaces, valves poking up, transformers at rear) and doesn't particularly make a statement beyond all of the other premium valve amps.

 

It is an interesting story (low volume, handmade, genius designer, only-the-best components, etc) and there probably is a way to exploit it - but I imagine it would be quite difficult. High end components are sold through 'boutique' shops primarily, and it is difficult to break into these. You could go for a lower price and sell directly, but you'd have to do clever marketing to get people to buy into it (The classic way might be long waiting-lists, personalized service, meet the genius, etc - but I'm not a marketing guy).

 

For me, I used to be into Hifi - at one point I had the 80's 'perfect setup' of a Sondek, Naim amp with Linn speakers - I even got some input into the Hifi press of the day (nothing to be proud of...). But it was always about the hardware, not the content. These days I have a reasonable system but I mainly value the time and space when I can listen to the music.

 

Would I buy one if you commercialized it - possibly would have done 20 years ago, but these days probably not. I'd prefer to spend effort/time buying a class-t amp (like the sonic impact) and seeing what it sounds like. Anyway, I've got a valve amp - it sounds great but not appreciably better than my normal setup (different, but not better), and the hassles of using it means it doesn't get used much.

 

 

 

 

 

Yeah.

The care he took in the design of the visual look, was also taken in "designing the sound" that comes out of them.

 

In the back of my mind, I have an idea about maybe licensing his design, and trying to manufacture some sets in Hong Kong. Before doing that, I would want to find out if others are as enthusiastic as I was after hearing his systems.

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Have you got a decent system already then Bubbs? If so, what have you got and what sort of music do you like to listen to?

To be honest, I presently don't listen to Music very often - so maybe I am the wrong guy to partner with Choi.

 

I have a JVC mini-system with small speakers that hooks up to my wide-screen and I use mainly for playing DVDs.

 

When I heard Mr Choi's system in action it gave me a reason to think of buying a system and listening to music more. But I wonder if I would really do it. I am too busy listening to podcasts (with half my concentration), doing research on the web, and posting here.

 

I have tried to interest my partner's brother and others in the idea. If they were enthusiastic enough and seem committed enough, we could develop a business plan together, and I might help to finance it.

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Hi-Fi is an interesting market - the low end is dominated by 'ease of purchase' and the high end is dominated by brand image. It is quite difficult to break into.

 

I had some 'friends of friends' at college who designed an external digital-to-analogue converter for CD players (in the late 80s when this was novel) - they had a fantastic system that sounded great at a bargain price - but it failed to sell. They consulted a marketing expert who told them to put it in a pretty box and charge 10x the price - it went on to sell in larger numbers than before. The brand was established as 'high end' and product sold.

 

The Valve amp market is fairly small and there are quite a few players. Only a low proportion of people want anything more than a budget compact, and of those few, some might like a valve amp but couldn't live with the inconveniences (warm-up time, valve replacement, the difficulty in matching speakers, etc). Furthermore, you can buy valve amps at the HK$4-10000 mark - they might not be excellent but will give a 'valve sound' albeit potentially with valve nasties such as hum, weird harmonics or poor frequency response. Your amps might be superior but to your punter they are equally risky propositions.

 

You have to understand fully how much design is in these units - there aren't that many ways to electronically design a valve amplifier... I've got a book called 'Mullard circuits for audio amplifiers' published in 1959 in-front of me and I dare say that the basic circuit design is the same for these amplifiers. This said, there are benefits to be made with using quality (and massive) capacitors in the power supply and quality windings in the output transformers, and there is substantial design in the correct choice of wires, valves, transformers, capacitors, etc.

 

The underside circuitry is very reminiscent of those old Mullard amplifiers (and all valve amps of that era) - and while there isn't anything particularly wrong with that approach it does make it more difficult to increase production volume. It is also a nightmare to do quality checks during manufacture.

 

The amps certainly are very pretty, but it is a classic valve look (wood cheeks, shiny surfaces, valves poking up, transformers at rear) and doesn't particularly make a statement beyond all of the other premium valve amps.

 

It is an interesting story (low volume, handmade, genius designer, only-the-best components, etc) and there probably is a way to exploit it - but I imagine it would be quite difficult. High end components are sold through 'boutique' shops primarily, and it is difficult to break into these. You could go for a lower price and sell directly, but you'd have to do clever marketing to get people to buy into it (The classic way might be long waiting-lists, personalized service, meet the genius, etc - but I'm not a marketing guy).

 

For me, I used to be into Hifi - at one point I had the 80's 'perfect setup' of a Sondek, Naim amp with Linn speakers - I even got some input into the Hifi press of the day (nothing to be proud of...). But it was always about the hardware, not the content. These days I have a reasonable system but I mainly value the time and space when I can listen to the music.

 

Would I buy one if you commercialized it - possibly would have done 20 years ago, but these days probably not. I'd prefer to spend effort/time buying a class-t amp (like the sonic impact) and seeing what it sounds like. Anyway, I've got a valve amp - it sounds great but not appreciably better than my normal setup (different, but not better), and the hassles of using it means it doesn't get used much.

Thanks for those comments, Dgul. Very useful. Food for thought from someone who knows more than I about the subject.

 

Here's something I can tell you one of my friends here has bought some industrial space of 3,200 sf not too far from where I live. He is searching for ideas on how to use it. My partner's brother is an architect who teaches interior design, and I am helping him arrange to use the design of the space as a case study in one of his classes. The space will probably get redone before we get any input from the students. They will get a chance to "cut their teeth" on working against a real space. And we may have a contest, and select the best use of space. At the same time, we may get some more ideas about how to use such a space.

 

There are others here in HK (myself included) who are watching how this project works out. And other space in the same building has been offered to me.

 

One idea the new owner has been toying with is splitting up the space into open offices, and inviting traders friends of his to rent a desk and trade from the space. He might also have part of the space as storage. I am thinking about renting one of the desks, and maybe some storage. (My current place is so small, I don't have much room in my flat.)

 

It has occurred to me that I could buy one of Mr Choi's units, and use it as a sound system from this "trader's club" and see it others there who hear it get enthusiastic enough to buy one. If that works, then a small business might grow from word of mouth, without requiring a massive marketing effort and much advertising spending on my part. Once it gets going, I would likely turn it over to another and become a mere investor.

 

Anyway, that's one way that this idea might grow.

 

MORE: Hobbies-as-Business ideas (?):

=====

It has been fun talking about the business concept here, and I invite others to test their hobbies-as-business-ideas in the same way that this thread has done. I appreciate all the well-meaning and useful comments that the thread has generated.

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mrchoisets.jpg

Mr Choi hates silicon, but loves the sound from Valves

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Good Food : Next to Good Music

Our new friend Jack, the friendly chef from Alsace agreed with us that life in Macau was not just about making money. "I can only eat so many beefsteaks everyday," he said, after serving us up a delicious meal of carrot soup, salad, and spare ribs in his charm-filled corner restaurant. Jack's French Kitchen is about celebrate its first year. We were the only diners at his restaurant ...The food was delicious, and we found it easy to believe that his place was full every night, as he told us it was. He had done little or no advertising, relying on word of mouth to build his clientel, and we felt the urge to be the latest couple to pass on the news of our discovery.

 

Jack's Kitchen,

at 36 Estrada Do Repouso Macau / (Address may not be precise)

Phone: 2875-8089 / 6685-1844, for reservations to avoid disappointment.

( email: arnchoi@gmail.com )

I was in Macau again last week, and dropped by Jack's for another good French meal

 

jackskitchen.jpg

 

It was busy, and I was happy to hear that the restaurant is now getting much more attention.

 

I was told that Macau TV will soon be featuring the restaurant on a nightly news story,

 

And there was some talk about filming a cooking show.

 

Like a propery French restaurant, it will be closed for much of July and some of August, and Jack will be taking his family to France for a family holiday.

=== ===

 

Jack's Facebook link: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Jacks-Kitchen/209406629069444

Jack's Kitchen Wall-: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Jacks-Kitchen-%E6%B3%95%E5%BB%9A%E5%A4%A9%E5%9C%B0/153502454709787

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