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Entomophagy - A trend worth watching?

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While in my dentist's waiting room yesterday, I spent some time flicking through the latest 'New Yorker'. The article that really stuck in my mind was the start of a new trend in westerners showing an interest in eating insects, including them being served up in high-end restaurants. As a site that is always interested in shifting trends and how to profit from them, I thought I'd bring this to the attention of others.

 

The New Yorker article is not available free online (preview: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/08/15/110815fa_fact_goodyear), but I've remembered a few takeaway points

 


  •  
  • 80% of the world's population eat insects
  • Insects are a much more efficient source of protein than mammals
  • In parts of Mexico, grasshoppers are enjoyed, while shrimps/prawns are seen as being disgusting
  • Insects don't contribute to greenhouse gasses like cows do, or contribute to serious deforestation
  • Insect husbandry is easy - they like being crammed together and don't mind filthy conditions
  • As food resources become tighter, we have a ready supply of high-quality protein globally
  • British and American charities in sub-Saharan Africa have culled locusts when they could actually be a source of life-saving protein
  • Dutch company 'Bugs Originals' is now selling mealworm based snacks in Sligro (a Dutch Costco type shop)
  • Insects regularly appearing on the menus of high-end restaurants in New York and LA
  • Oh, the kicker: Insect protein is "gloopy" rather than muscle-based like protein from mammals

 

A good article in the Atlantic: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2011/09/bug-nuggets/8599/

Also, similar in NY times: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/15/world/europe/15bugs.html

One more: http://www.minyanville.com/dailyfeed/2011/08/10/is-insect-eating-really-the/

 

So, should we be investing in Bugs Originals? Or just ensuring that our post-financial-collapse plans involve a field of crickets as well as a vegetable patch?

 

My view is that while I think it will be a long time before we [in the west] are all chewing on insects for dinner, the Dutch are definitely onto something with their enriched snacks. It doesn't seem that different from bodybuilders adding protein-powder (from whey) to their meals. By removing the emotional aspect of eating bugs and rearing them in professional labs, we could help reduce the impact of rearing mammals for protein. With the increase in global population and greater costs associated with food, I believe we may soon enter a period of food shortage. I hope that these Dutch scientists can help reduce starvation and increase the sustainability of our food.

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While in my dentist's waiting room yesterday, I spent some time flicking through the latest 'New Yorker'. The article that really stuck in my mind was the start of a new trend in westerners showing an interest in eating insects, including them being served up in high-end restaurants. As a site that is always interested in shifting trends and how to profit from them, I thought I'd bring this to the attention of others.

 

The New Yorker article is not available free online (preview: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/08/15/110815fa_fact_goodyear), but I've remembered a few takeaway points

 


  •  
  • 80% of the world's population eat insects
  • Insects are a much more efficient source of protein than mammals
  • In parts of Mexico, grasshoppers are enjoyed, while shrimps/prawns are seen as being disgusting
  • Insects don't contribute to greenhouse gasses like cows do, or contribute to serious deforestation
  • Insect husbandry is easy - they like being crammed together and don't mind filthy conditions
  • As food resources become tighter, we have a ready supply of high-quality protein globally
  • British and American charities in sub-Saharan Africa have culled locusts when they could actually be a source of life-saving protein
  • Dutch company 'Bugs Originals' is now selling mealworm based snacks in Sligro (a Dutch Costco type shop)
  • Insects regularly appearing on the menus of high-end restaurants in New York and LA
  • Oh, the kicker: Insect protein is "gloopy" rather than muscle-based like protein from mammals

 

A good article in the Atlantic: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2011/09/bug-nuggets/8599/

Also, similar in NY times: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/15/world/europe/15bugs.html

One more: http://www.minyanville.com/dailyfeed/2011/08/10/is-insect-eating-really-the/

 

So, should we be investing in Bugs Originals? Or just ensuring that our post-financial-collapse plans involve a field of crickets as well as a vegetable patch?

 

My view is that while I think it will be a long time before we [in the west] are all chewing on insects for dinner, the Dutch are definitely onto something with their enriched snacks. It doesn't seem that different from bodybuilders adding protein-powder (from whey) to their meals. By removing the emotional aspect of eating bugs and rearing them in professional labs, we could help reduce the impact of rearing mammals for protein. With the increase in global population and greater costs associated with food, I believe we may soon enter a period of food shortage. I hope that these Dutch scientists can help reduce starvation and increase the sustainability of our food.

 

Are insects legally classed as a food in USA/UK? Importing and farming them may result in a visit from rentakill.

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While in my dentist's waiting room yesterday, I spent some time flicking through the latest 'New Yorker'. The article that really stuck in my mind was the start of a new trend in westerners showing an interest in eating insects, including them being served up in high-end restaurants. As a site that is always interested in shifting trends and how to profit from them, I thought I'd bring this to the attention of others.

 

The New Yorker article is not available free online (preview: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/08/15/110815fa_fact_goodyear), but I've remembered a few takeaway points

 


  •  
  • 80% of the world's population eat insects
  • Insects are a much more efficient source of protein than mammals
  • In parts of Mexico, grasshoppers are enjoyed, while shrimps/prawns are seen as being disgusting
  • Insects don't contribute to greenhouse gasses like cows do, or contribute to serious deforestation
  • Insect husbandry is easy - they like being crammed together and don't mind filthy conditions
  • As food resources become tighter, we have a ready supply of high-quality protein globally
  • British and American charities in sub-Saharan Africa have culled locusts when they could actually be a source of life-saving protein
  • Dutch company 'Bugs Originals' is now selling mealworm based snacks in Sligro (a Dutch Costco type shop)
  • Insects regularly appearing on the menus of high-end restaurants in New York and LA
  • Oh, the kicker: Insect protein is "gloopy" rather than muscle-based like protein from mammals

 

A good article in the Atlantic: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2011/09/bug-nuggets/8599/

Also, similar in NY times: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/15/world/europe/15bugs.html

One more: http://www.minyanville.com/dailyfeed/2011/08/10/is-insect-eating-really-the/

 

So, should we be investing in Bugs Originals? Or just ensuring that our post-financial-collapse plans involve a field of crickets as well as a vegetable patch?

 

My view is that while I think it will be a long time before we [in the west] are all chewing on insects for dinner, the Dutch are definitely onto something with their enriched snacks. It doesn't seem that different from bodybuilders adding protein-powder (from whey) to their meals. By removing the emotional aspect of eating bugs and rearing them in professional labs, we could help reduce the impact of rearing mammals for protein. With the increase in global population and greater costs associated with food, I believe we may soon enter a period of food shortage. I hope that these Dutch scientists can help reduce starvation and increase the sustainability of our food.

 

 

 

 

Ive no objection to other people eating them if it makes beef cheaper. However are insects legally classed as a food in USA/UK? Farming them may result in a visit from rentakill.

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Ive no objection to other people eating them if it makes beef cheaper. However are insects legally classed as a food in USA/UK? Farming them may result in a visit from rentakill.

That's a good point. In the Atlantic article, one of the scientists says they are still classified by the government as "agricultural waste", I presume in the EU. He's working on them getting recognized as livestock.

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Here in NZ we have an annual Wild Foods Festival. The big success this year was heralded

by the headline "Women flock to take horse-semen shots"

 

Well I guess you gotta get the protein in whatever form you can :huh: Seriously, check out some of the quotes in that article above.

 

The fried crickets were big a couple of years ago. We Kiwi's are trendsetters! I bet the Sex in the City girls would love it. Cheaper than Musashi? Less allergins then whey? Make it into some kind of RTD and see how it goes.

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Here in NZ we have an annual Wild Foods Festival. The big success this year was heralded

by the headline "Women flock to take horse-semen shots"

 

Well I guess you gotta get the protein in whatever form you can :huh: Seriously, check out some of the quotes in that article above.

 

The fried crickets were big a couple of years ago. We Kiwi's are trendsetters! I bet the Sex in the City girls would love it. Cheaper than Musashi? Less allergins then whey? Make it into some kind of RTD and see how it goes.

Wow, sounds horrible. Those Kiwi girls have certainly got some spunk.

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