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drbubb

Costa Rica - A Central American Haven ?

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Less room to fall when the global economy slides.

And it seems that they can feed themselves

 

 

Why would they be willing to sell food, if they are suffering? There is a interesting thread on GIM right now about 'will you help a total stranger in the time of collapse'- a very interesting read.

 

My personal opinion (which is not worth anything) is NO I wont. I will take care of my flock. I believe that's what most people will do.

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Why would they be willing to sell food, if they are suffering? There is a interesting thread on GIM right now about 'will you help a total stranger in the time of collapse'- a very interesting read.

 

My personal opinion (which is not worth anything) is NO I wont. I will take care of my flock. I believe that's what most people will do.

Well your chances of getting food in hard times, are much better in a country with an agricultural surplus than in one whose industrial base has been undermined by disasters and imports much of its food. You may need to be very rich in the second sort of country to get the food you may want. While be relatively better off, with a relationship with farmers may be sufficient in a country with an agricultural surplus.

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Yes, it is on the Ring of Fire

earthq8.jpg

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In the apocalyptic world we are headed into, I think you need to be in a country that grows most of its own food, is not too "complex", and is not too exposed to the floods and other "earth changes" that may continue to hit with increasing frequency.

 

It seems that Bogota may fit these criteria.

 

-It is approximately 2500 metres above sea level and therefore probably the largest city at such a high altitude.

 

-The sante fe valley (plateau) is huge and supports alot of agriculture (beef, dairy, chicken,crops: corn)

 

- Colombia is an exporter of food and most of its industry and manufacturing is domestic based. It hasn't succumbed to major international brands but has home grown varieties for clothing, food brands, shops, restaurants...

 

- The sound of Bogota may make you cringe and think of drug lords and guerilla warfare but over the last decade alot has changed with the political landscape with the FARC losing lots of ground to a sophisticated colombian military. Kidnappings are not so common anymore. And cities like Medellin, once home to Pablo Escobar, are going through an architectural renaisance. Unfortunately, other places are no longer safe like they used to be - Mexico comes to mind particularly.

 

- Bogota has many charming areas and a rich culture with sidewalk cafes (93 area), lively districts with artistic flavours (usaquen). There are areas you do want to avoid. The city is divided generally by the south (poor) and north (better of and safer).

 

- Bogota is actually a very green city. Every Sunday a major boulevard is closed to cars and open to cyclists and joggers (la septima). The city has been developing the transmillenio bus system for over a decade now and encourages commuters to take its network of busses with dedicated lanes. The city discourages limits the number of cars on the road through pico placa - your plate number ending indictes which day you can use your car and which day you can't. Fines fot not obeying can be huge.

 

- Many place in the world suffer from corruption (India, Mexico, Phillipines...), so did Colombia but this has been largely eradicated. If you try to pay off a police officer these days you may find yourself in big trouble.

 

- It does still suffer from urban crime as all major cities do and you need to use your wits. For example, if you need to take a taxi it is better to call one for pick up rather than take one on the street.

 

Food for thought?

 

BTW, why do you think heading into an apocolyptic world is a done deal?

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I have also spent a lot of time in Bogota. Colombia is one of my top three places in the world.

 

But I would not recommend it as a safe haven. Bogota as a place to ride out the crisis ... I don't know. If you live there, you'd be lucky to make it as far as the crisis.

 

I don't know what it's current status is, I think Johannesburg may have overtaken it, but it was not so long ago the most violent city in the world. When I was there back in the 90s, if I wanted to go out after dark on foot, I used to run down the middle of the road. Pavements weren't safe.

 

I agree surfdude with your criteria, but Colombia is a law unto itself.

 

I also agree with you - why is said crisis a done deal?

 

Colombia ... amazing place. But mental.

 

All of South and Central America is totally dependent on cars, buses and planes. In fact all or North and South America is. If your criteria are so stringent that you can't go anywhere that relies on these forms of transport, you need to write off these two continents. Probably Africa as well. Australasia. Most of Asia. And parts of Europe.

 

There is also the possibility that the world is not going to end. And if you spend your whole life preparing for the end of the world. And it doesn't happen. You may have wasted your life.

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There is also the possibility that the world is not going to end. And if you spend your whole life preparing for the end of the world. And it doesn't happen. You may have wasted your life.

 

Amen to that. Nothing wrong with preparing for bad times, but then there is life long obsession to being doomed up - hardly a fantastic obituary.

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There is also the possibility that the world is not going to end. And if you spend your whole life preparing for the end of the world. And it doesn't happen. You may have wasted your life.

I do not expect the world to end.

We will have a 2013, followed by a 2014.

 

But if the earthquakes and earth changes continue, I think it will be useful to have a plan, and be prepared to implement it, if the changes accelerate. In the meantime, think of it as a new type of Eco/Earth Change tourism

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I have also spent a lot of time in Bogota. Colombia is one of my top three places in the world.

 

I don't know what it's current status is, I think Johannesburg may have overtaken it, but it was not so long ago the most violent city in the world. When I was there back in the 90s, if I wanted to go out after dark on foot, I used to run down the middle of the road. Pavements weren't safe.

 

 

Hi CC,

Bogota has changed alot in the last 15 years. i believe when you were there it was a turbulent time with Pablo Escobar on the run, and guerillas making front page news. The tide has turned significantly on both of these fronts with operations moving farther afield (mexico for drugs and guerillas hiding in the Amazon jungles by Ecuador/Venezuela.

 

But you are right about needing to be careful at night depending on what area you are in and people are largely dependent on the car. Although, many areas are fairly self-contained. Usaquen comes to mind, which has many cafes, restaurants, mercados, galleries all within walking distance and a nice plaza too.

 

BTW, what were you doing in Bogota in the 90's beside running down the middle of the road at night. :D

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I do not expect the world to end.

We will have a 2013, followed by a 2014.

 

But if the earthquakes and earth changes continue, I think it will be useful to have a plan, and be prepared to implement it, if the changes accelerate. In the meantime, think of it as a new type of Eco/Earth Change tourism

 

Seriously. Don't even consider this romantic developing world survivalist notion you have. These are dangerous places and you will always be viewed with suspicion, hatred, loathing and outright racism . . . all through ignorant uneducated tumbleweed hick eyes.

 

You will also be a target and mainly a target of corrupt police for which Costa Rica is renowned.

 

Stay in the upmarket HK condo clubhouse. It's quite literally a world apart.

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Location: Peñas Blancas Canyon

Total price: $320,000

Land in Hectares: 80 ha

Area in Acres: 198 ac

Price per hectare: $4,000

Price per acre: $1,619

 

Rainforest Plateau for Sale in Costa Rica

A fertile plateau sits along a jungle covered canyon. Farming and cattle ranching take advantage of the scarce plowable land among rainforest mountains.

 

This mountain farm in Costa Rica is by far the nicest in the area. The farm has plenty of land for plows and tractors. A small creek trickles down from the jungle's border. It supplies a never ending supply of fresh spring water.

 

A view of the rainforest comes with the mountain farm. The forests belong to Arenal and Monteverde protected areas in Costa Rica

 

source: http://www.farms.cr/plateau.html

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Costa Rica looks good for potential growth, a large young (working) population only having to support a relatively small number of retirees.

cs-2010.png

Indeed.

 

A sort of OPPOSITE to Japan

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How do you get there? Parachuting in?

Indeed.

$300k does not include the cost of the road.

If something looks cheap, there is usually a reason.

(But if you want to be far away from other people, the lack of a road may help)

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Indeed.

$300k does not include the cost of the road.

If something looks cheap, there is usually a reason.

(But if you want to be far away from other people, the lack of a road may help)

Hmm, maybe a farm somewhere in Idaho or Wales would be a better idea? Or a Cringo fortress (with a little private armee, I suppose?) in the wilderness, like Doug Casey's project.

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Not far enough above sea level to suit my tastes.

 

Hong Kong actually fares - not so bad, provided you live on the peak or a higher elevation of Kowloon.

But if a flood knocks out the transport, you may survive a tsunami, but have no food in a city with many hungry survivors.

 

Sorry Bubb, I misled you. When I said "minor English speaking islands" I was referring to Caribbean islands. I believe are all volcanic & thus must have high ground. The downside comes with any polar shift of course, but such matters are discussed elsewhere :)

Over a five week stay we found the natives at the southern end of the Grenadines to be genuinely caring & friendly, & we felt very safe there with not one hint of menace. Unless one is in a busy town, greeting everyone who passes is obligatory, even the unemployed teenage youth hanging around.

Property is plentiful & mostly still over-priced (a tedious British it's-different-here influence exists) with few buying, but at my age I don't see any point in owning anyway.

Long term rental is the way to go IMHO, & by asking around (it's amazing who you meet in a bar/restaurant) we were offered various places, & took a 2 bed apartment fronting the ocean (but high up) for under $4000 U.S./year.

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Sorry Bubb, I misled you. When I said "minor English speaking islands" I was referring to Caribbean islands. I believe are all volcanic & thus must have high ground. The downside comes with any polar shift of course, but such matters are discussed elsewhere :)

Over a five week stay we found the natives at the southern end of the Grenadines to be genuinely caring & friendly, & we felt very safe there with not one hint of menace. Unless one is in a busy town, greeting everyone who passes is obligatory, even the unemployed teenage youth hanging around.

Property is plentiful & mostly still over-priced (a tedious British it's-different-here influence exists) with few buying, but at my age I don't see any point in owning anyway.

Long term rental is the way to go IMHO, & by asking around (it's amazing who you meet in a bar/restaurant) we were offered various places, & took a 2 bed apartment fronting the ocean (but high up) for under $4000 U.S./year.

 

I did a day trip to the Grenadines from Barbados

landed at Union Is then a yacht to Palm Is and Mayreau

was very nice

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If this happens, it is not so good for Costa Rica...

 

MESSAGE...

 

Dr. J. Allen Hynek's Assistant Comes Forward

 

Ann Eller, the former assistant to one-time Government UFO debunker, Dr. J. Allen Hynek comes forward with a talk about the end of this era and the beginning of the new, from her point of view, as a self-described alien abductee.

 

Eller says that it's time to prepare for the cataclysmic "cleansing" of planet Earth, which should occur a little over one year from now, with the passage of the brown dwarf twin of our Sun, which is allegedly hard to see because its line of sight is directly behind the Sun. (This claim has been widely debunked by NASA).

 

Known to some as "Nibiru," she says this celestial body is four times the mass of Earth and that it will come within 14 million miles of us, wreaking unimaginable havoc on our planet: a pole shift and the rearrangement of the oceans and continents, whereby "Brazil will be moved sideways" and come to rest beneath the new North Pole, while Central America is completely obliterated.

 

Eller says the Japan earthquake was just a small preview of what is to come.

 

The best ways to prepare are:

 

1. Seek your own inner spiritual guidance

2. Make peace with God, as you experience God.

3. Tell your families and friends that you love them. Ask for forgiveness and forgive.

4. Time is short and many of us will leave Earth and begin our next incarnation on the New Earth, which is emerging in 4D. (remember, she says, there is no death).

/source: http://www.forbiddenknowledgetv.com/videos/religion--spiritual-practice/dragon-in-the-sky-planet-xaliens--beyond.html

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