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10 Skills Needed to Thrive in a Post-Collapse World

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10 Skills Needed to Thrive in a Post-Collapse World

"a post-apocalyptic Mad Max-type world"

But you can live in: "a pocket of energy and food independence"

===========================================

 

Taken from:

 

Activist Post

Interrupt Your Regularly Scheduled Programming

 

Nice subtitle eh? Well I like it. Scroll down article for the top ten, bolded by moi. In the original article links to futher information are provided.

 

 

http://www.activistpost.com/2010/11/10-ski...ve-in-post.html

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

10 Skills Needed to Thrive in a Post-Collapse World

Knowledge is something that no one can take from you. It's the eternal wealth that will help you thrive in a Post-Collapse world.

 

Mad Max: Village Roadshow Pictures

Jeffrey Green / Activist Post

 

Some experts see the perfect storm emerging for a dramatic collapse of Western civilization claiming we've reached environmental, economic, and geopolitical tipping points. Clearly, some skills will be far more valuable than others if this societal breakdown occurs. Sorry bankers, lawyers, and accountants, there won't be a need for you in a post-collapse world.

 

Before we quantify the skill sets that will be viable, it is important to define the severity of a "post-collapse" scenario. When taken as a whole, together these tipping points could potentially converge to create a post-apocalyptic Mad Max-type world for the vast majority of humanity. However, given the advanced technology that we possess today, it is unlikely to ever become quite that primitive ever again. Surely there will be pockets of energy and food independence no matter what possible scenario unfolds, but the vast majority may be left to fend for themselves.

 

 

It would take a serious cataclysmic earth event like a super volcano, a meteor impact, major electromagnetic pulse event, or dramatic pole shift to affect the entirety of humanity. Man-made events like nuclear war, environmental damage, or total economic collapse, no matter how devastating, will be somewhat isolated and contained to specific areas and populations. Incidentally, every nation or territory that has experienced these man-made catastrophes has roared back to life in less than one generation. The only example of nuclear survival was in Japan, while the largest recent economic collapse was the break-up of the Soviet Union. In both cases those countries went through a very tough period, but ultimately they persevered.

 

For sake of this article, let's assume that some level of devastation is caused by each type of tipping point in the United States. Our ever escalating wars finally reach our shores by way of long-range nuclear missiles, total economic collapse occurs rendering the dollar worthless, and we would likely have less electricity and water than Iraq did after Bush's "shock and awe" campaign. Gasoline and oil supplies would likely be down to a trickle, halting all supply lines of food and other goods to big box stores. Factory farming will be impossible without cheap oil products readily available. The suffering will be dramatic.

 

The only question will become, how do the citizens react? Both the USSR and early 1950s Japan were far more agrarian, and far less dependent on big box stores than America currently is. American dependence on long supply lines, interconnected yet vulnerable electric grid, and pharmaceutical-based healthcare may lead to a more severe breakdown of society than witnessed in those countries. Although, innovative technology for alternative energy and agriculture practices will play a part in surviving; but they can only help the few with the knowledge, means, and stability to use them. And stability will be in low supply for some time, resulting in only small groups with relative comfort -- those who planned for the worse. However, as an optimist, I believe that after the initial chaos Americans will rediscover solidarity for one-another, much like they did after 9/11, but this time it will be more sustained out of absolute necessity.

 

Many articles have been written about how to survive the coming collapse, or what is needed to survive, but not many articles have been written about what skills will have value in a post-collapse world. Imagine fulfilling human necessity without consistent fuel or electricity, large-scale food production, or fully-stocked pharmacies and hospitals. The only form of wealth in a collapsed civilization is the knowledge and skills to produce something of human value.

Here are 10 invaluable skills that will likely help you sustain yourself in a hand-made local world:

 

1. Organic Gardening and Seed Saving: Skills involving food production will be the most valuable in a post-collapse society. Learning to grow your own food is a must. Obviously, it is necessary to feed your family, but you will also be able to trade your abundance for other items. Additionally, learning to save seeds will also provide another excellent means of trade.

 

2. Food Processing and Preservation: Learning to process and preserve foods will be another huge skill in a post-collapse world. Taking seasonal abundance and preserving it for future consumption or trade will be vital. Remember, learning to do this with limited electricity is a must. This can also include learning to brew beer, mead, vinegar, or other alcoholic beverages from meager ingredients.

 

3. Hunting, Fishing, and Gathering: Learning to fish and hunt is essential to survival. Having the proper gear and training will be priceless after the collapse of modern civilization. Having reference guides for edible plants in your region, repairing weapons, trapping wild game, and fishing are great tools to have if you haven't the time to learn them now. In regards to weapons, your ability to use them also gives you the skill of working security.

4. Animal Husbandry: Notice the first four categories are related to food production. It's that important. Just gaining knowledge of one of these categories will give you an invaluable skill to thrive in a post-apocalyptic world. Knowledge of animal husbandry can provide endless amounts of sustainable meat, eggs, and milk to you and your tribe.

 

5. Construction: Construction skills will be very important in a shattered civilization. These skills, especially without power tools, are not something you learn overnight. If you have some basic skills it may be worth learning a few techniques for building small structures with crude hand tools. There are many books teaching anyone how to build basic cabins, sheds, and composting outhouses.

6. Alternative Energy and Fuels: Having the knowledge to implement alternative energy systems will make you a wealthy survivor in a "dark" world. You can learn to build your own alternative energy systems, or you can purchase back up solar generators in preparation for emergencies. There are also small fuel refinery systems available like the biodiesel Fuelmeister, and the new invention from Japan that turns plastic into oil. Knowledge of how to create energy would be invaluable when oil is scarce.

 

7. Water Purification: Since it's difficult to pump well water without electricity and with surface water likely to be contaminated, clean water will be in very limited supply. Learning to purify water will allow you thrive during this time. You can also purchase water filters for your go-bag that will last weeks, and you can have back-up tablets should you need them. However, the skill and knowledge to purify water should be the goal as that can never run out.

8. Basic First Aid and Natural Medicine: This is another skill that can take years to develop and learn, but that will be crucial when supply lines of pharmaceuticals are cut off and hospitals are over-run. Knowledge of growing herbal gardens for making medicine at home will prove to be very important. Learning basic procedures for stitching wounds, CPR, and more will also be of great assistance. Being the tribe's shaman with a natural medicine chest is a prestigious position

9. Mechanics: Mechanics for cars, motorcycles, tractors and other machinery will likely be in high demand. In addition, bicycle mechanics will also fair well in world where fuel is very expensive or hard to come by. These are also skills that are not learned over night, but it will be wise to at least have access to books or how-to videos.

 

10. Soap and Candle Making: With long supply lines decimated and electricity on the fritz, soap and candle makers will provide a valuable product. Clearly some preparation of storing raw materials may be needed to achieve trade-able levels of these goods. Even if you just had the knowledge to make soap or candles just for your immediate tribe, you will be much better off for it.

 

You'll notice that many of these skills also fall into the category of what you would need to be self-sufficient. Again, learning all of these skills will be virtually impossible, especially if the collapse isn't that far off as many predict. Determine which skills that most appeal to you and focus on them by studying and acquiring the tools needed. Since you can't become an expert in everything it may be wise to recruit tribe members with various survival skills. It will also be beneficial to build up your library of "how to" books and videos for tasks that you are not proficient in. You can download any video from Youtube by using Keepvid.com and build your library into an external hard drive.

 

Remember, knowledge of and skills to produce human necessities will be the only form of wealth creation in a hand-made world. Knowledge is something that no one can take from you. It's the eternal wealth that will help you thrive in a Post-Collapse world. Get Prepared Now!

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(from above):

"Incidentally, every nation or territory that has experienced these man-made catastrophes has roared back to life in less than one generation. The only example of nuclear survival was in Japan, while the largest recent economic collapse was the break-up of the Soviet Union. In both cases those countries went through a very tough period, but ultimately they persevered."

 

Brush up your Skills - Dimitri Orlov is back:

 

From:

 

Dmitry Orlov, engineer and author, warns that the US's reliance on diminishing fuel supplies might be sending it down the same path the Soviet Union took before it collapsed.

 

In this fifth video in the series "Peak Oil and a Changing Climate" from The Nation and On The Earth Productions, Orlov, who was an eyewitness to the collapse of the Soviet Union, asserts that run-away debt and national bankruptcy will lead the US to its demise, just as it did for Moscow. As oil becomes more expensive and scarcer, the US will no longer be able to finance its importation and the economy will hit a wall, he says.

 

"Sixty percent of all of our transportation fuels are imported—a lot of that is on credit. A large chunk of the trade deficit is actually in transportation fuels. When those stop arriving because of our inability to borrow more money, then the economy is at a standstill," he says.

 

Visit : http://www.thenation.com to learn more about "Peak Oil and a Changing Climate," and to see the other videos in the series.

 

== ==

 

"The people best set up to Pick up the pieces are the Narco cartels... They will be the new aristocracy."

(They are well organised, and know how to survive when the currency is worthless.)

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A weaker Dollar -- here's DXY (Trade-weighted US$) - down from 88 to 78 ... update

zzzzp.gif

 

... has meant higher oil Prices / here's WTI Crude - priced in US$ :

001sq.png

 

In the longer term, when the Dollar really collapses - Oil will become unaffordable for most Americans.

 

COMPARE:

Here's WTI in Sfr :

002nv.png

 

This makes it look like Oil is getting cheaper.

 

The difference is due to a weaker Dollar --- Thanks, Ben !

== == ==

 

 

USO doesn't track Oil very well, so I prefer to use this pair:

 

OIH versus OIlB.L (Brent etf) ... update : 5yrs-w/USO : intraday

002xj.gif

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From: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b4gr6T_FHPI

 

From: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJVLpB5Oo8I

 

Mike Ruppert discusses his own background, and what led him into becoming passionate about making preparations

for a "post collapse world"

== == ==

 

Stages of Collapse - per Dimitry Orlov

 

1. Financial collapse

2. Commercial collapse

3. Political collapse

 

After wealth is destroyed, the economy begins to falter, and the commercial processes that provide food and other essentials begins to fall apart. People get angry, riot, and demand political change.

 

We are seeing this progression of crises around the world*, and it is going to get worse as food and energy price rise.

== == ==

 

*Isn't this what is happening now on North Africa? - ( ie a commercial and political collapse)

How long before it spreads to Europe and the US?

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As to "getting ready" what can you do on that list in HK, Bubb?

Interesting link, btw.

I expect that HK may be on of the last urban cities to rollover into massive change, and so I may have time to see how the "dust is settling" elsewhere.

 

To uproot myself, and my partner - who likes being close to her family - to gamble on finding the right place to weather a pols shift or a long emergency, whichever we see - seems like an act of madness right now.

 

But I am keep my eyes open and monitoring developments closely - hence this thread. I shall probably spend more time traveling in 2011 to see what opportunities there are.

 

THE STEPS TO SURVIVAL (as recommended by Mike Ruppert) - some I have taken - like getting out of debt:

 

...as suggested in this video series:

 

Peak Oil Preparations: Get Out of Debt 1/3 - Michael Ruppert:

2/3 :

3/3 :

 

Points :

=====

+ Get out of debt, to gain flexibility

+ Save something every week - you need a "rainy day fund" (Peak Oil is the biggest rainy day)

+ Economic solutions will local

+ Resilience and survival will depend on community efforts (at local level)

+ Debt-based growth is a "pyramid scheme" that you need to disengage from

+ I encourage young people to buy gold

+ "Money" represents work, but energy is the ability to do work

 

OTHER Preparations:

+ Having your own garden

+ Insulating your home (even if you rent it)

+ Having some food stored, but not "hoarding" food

+ Solar panels, if the returns make sense

+ (Elsewhere he has spoken of buying seeds and tools, I believe)

 

Final point was: "We are all screwed (laughs)... but we do not need to all go down together"

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STORING WEALTH - A Challenge in times of money printing & political chaos

 

+ "Money" represents work, but energy is the ability to do work

+ Money is useless without energy

I like this - it is a KEY INSIGHT, I think.

 

Let me expand on it:

Energy trumps money, at the moment you need it to do work

BUT : Energy is hard to store, and normally it losses value whilst it is stored.

 

Money is easier to store, and you can invest it to earn income.

But this becomes dangerous in times when fiat money is being printed - like now.

 

So how does one store "value", if not through money ?

 

Gold is an answer, and perhaps other commodities too.

Paper claims on future energy (or future food) - like futures on Energy and food may be a superior way to store value, rather than as fiat paper money, which can lose value simply through excess supply (ir Fed money printing.)

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Points :

=====

+ Economic solutions will local

+ Resilience and survival will depend on community efforts (at local level)

Operating at the "local level" from people doing it now:

 

Navigating with the Decline

From: peakmoment | October 28, 2010 | 3,004 views

 

Peak Moment 183: This time Janaia's in the hot seat!

In this interview by Jim Fritz on Port Townsend Television, she tackles corporate control and a dysfunctional system that profits from increasing unhealthiness and consuming the planet. She points to Peak Moment guests as models for the average family to gain genuine security. They're withdrawing from the money system, growing food, and joining neighbors to prepare for emergencies. ... (more info)

 

From:

 

"You have to build in a buffer in the food you are grwoing, so you will have excess food."

"So you need to be able to trade food with your neighbors."

 

FEED ONE ANOTHER, he says.

== ==

 

UK CONTEXT ... has others struggling with the same challenges

 

Time's Up! An Uncivilized Solution / from Scotland via Skype:

 

From:

 

Author Keith Farnish sees industrial civilization as the most destructive way of living yet devised by humans. And it's over: environmental degradation and depletion tell us it can't continue. The system has myriad ways to make us believe we can't live without it. But Keith believes we can - there are countless ways to move forward into contented, happy, and full lives. We can "disengage" and reconnect with the natural world, ourselves, and others.

( http://www.unsuitablog.com , http://www.theearthblog.org )

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STORING WEALTH - A Challenge in times of money printing & political chaos

 

 

I like this - it is a KEY INSIGHT, I think.

 

Let me expand on it:

Energy trumps money, at the moment you need it to do work

BUT : Energy is hard to store, and normally it losses value whilst it is stored.

 

Money is easier to store, and you can invest it to earn income.

But this becomes dangerous in times when fiat money is being printed - like now.

 

So how does one store "value", if not through money ?

 

Gold is an answer, and perhaps other commodities too.

Paper claims on future energy (or future food) - like futures on Energy and food may be a superior way to store value, rather than as fiat paper money, which can lose value simply through excess supply (ir Fed money printing.)

 

 

Yes but the 'insurance' of a paper claim on say a loaf of bread will be of little use if the last loaf has just been sold??

 

NB notice you say 'may be a superior' ........... tho.

 

thinking on........ I guess the 'insurance' will enable the holder to buy the last few loaves at say £50, whereas those without the 'insurance' would not have had £50 at all available to spend?? ...... but would the insurers still be viable under such circumstances?

 

 

just thoughts.........

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Finding a Transition and Careers for a Post-Peak oil world

 

Transitioning to the Elm Street Economy (designed to meet LOCAL needs)

 

From:

 

Peak Moment 173: How can you contribute your skills towards meeting real needs now and in the future?

 

Sarah and Paul Edwards, the authors of Home-Based Business for Dummies, focus on the "Elm Street Economy" of locally-owned businesses rather than "Main Street", which we hear so much about, but is comprised mainly of franchises.

 

In the Elm Street Economy, local businesses meet local needs - for food, shelter, clothing, heating, electricity, healthcare, and other products. Sarah and Paul suggest: Keep your job and pay off your debts, while gaining enduring skills for the future. A large number of today's professions won't be around in five years. (www.elmstreeteconomy.com, www.letslivelocal.org)

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Wow! Where is your last brilliant post Bubb? I go away to take a bath and think about it and now it is gone! Can you magic it back?

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Whoops! It seems like I lost the response to this one somehow (? !)

Yes but the 'insurance' of a paper claim on say a loaf of bread will be of little use if the last loaf has just been sold??

 

NB notice you say 'may be a superior' ........... tho.

thinking on........ I guess the 'insurance' will enable the holder to buy the last few loaves at say £50, whereas those without the 'insurance' would not have had £50 at all available to spend?? ...... but would the insurers still be viable under such circumstances?

just thoughts.........

 

I don't recommend waiting for the last loaf of bread !

Someone who has "hedged" using financial instruments (and gold too !) is going to face a big challenge at some stage ... if we continue to slide towards a Post Peak/ Mad Max / Long emergency type world. The challenge will be to "buy the farm" or at least a place on it, before it is too late.

 

I am sorry to say, but the big losers in a world BEYOND FINANCIAL COLLAPSE are going to be the City dwellers, especially those dependent upon the state or those with marginal jobs and low incomes. The city, and its urban residents are going to have trouble feeding themselves. This is especially true in now "successful" crowded cities, like New York, London, and Hong Kong. Shrinking cities, like Detroit, may fare better - as they may have begun to turn abandoned parts of the city into Urban farms.

 

The problem is that at some stage a Commercial collapse may hit, and the systems of production and distribution that move food to the city may begin to breakdown. City dwellers will not be able to feed themselves, and so they will have to trade what they have for food. If what they have left is mostly "financial assets" denominated in fiat currency, they may have little value in a trade for food and energy. Hungry citizens will become capable of theft, and violence as they chase the food they need to survive. Many will leave the city, seeking food and economic opportunities in the countryside. (I have read that in Roman times, as the Empire failed, city people indentured themselves as serfs on country estates, just to get fed. Those who could not find work and a living wage died in the famines that periodically spread to the city, and Rome lost something like 90% of its population in about 50 years.)

 

Authorities, if there are any left, may try to "maintain order" in the cities with police and military forces - and by charitable efforts: soup kitchens, bread lines etc.

 

The past - when the world existed in Black & White

volunteers_of_america_soup_kitchen_wdc.g

 

The present

Teak%20dinner.JPG

 

The urban rich will try to hold on, but will find their property has lost value, and is foreclosed by banks, and their financial assets have plummetted in value. Even gold and silver may not hold their current valuation in relation to rising food prices, at certain stages in an unfolding crisis.

 

In such a world, farmers and those who control energy and water will set the "terms of trade." They may have little use for fiat currency, and the other items that city dwellers may want to barter for food. What use will a "week's stay in someone's spare room" be to a farmer or farm worker, who sees the city as a dangerous place, and wants to avoid it altogether.

 

The remaining wealthy folk from the city may try to "buy their way in" to a self-sufficient farming community, but those who live there are likely to be reluctant to welcome "spoilt" rich folk into their midst, unless they have valuable skills. Investment banking, commodity trading, accountancy, or legal skill is unlikely to be of much demand in a farming community. (I would rather be a doctor, especially one who is a GP skilled in using home remedies.)

 

The time to be hedging against an Urban collapse is when few see it coming. When the vast majority of urban dwellers want to leave the city, they will find that the supply of opportunities is scarce, and demand of too many people seeking the change is against them. Their transition to the farm may be blocked by economics, or just the desire of those who are there to "save" their communities from outsiders.

 

I can imagine that for the next 3-5 years, before things get really bad, some forward-thinking city dwellers will be willing to invest in rural communities, provided they are guaranteed a place within one (for themselves and their families) it things get really harsh in the big city.

 

Maybe the revival of small towns (that JH Kunstler foresees) will be spurred on by investments from city dwellers seeking a possible refuge from a crumbling city environment, such as I have described.

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10 Skills Needed to Thrive in a Post-Collapse World

I would guess that the most simple rule will be: the bigger the city you're in, the bigger the doodoo you're in (if you don't have your own private army). At least in (post-)war Europe that usually applied AFAICS.

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I would guess that the most simple rule will be: the bigger the city you're in, the bigger the doodoo you're in (if you don't have your own private army). At least in (post-)war Europe that usually applied AFAICS.

As soon as a large enough people start thinking this way, and begin to do something about it (like moving outside the city to the country), demand for Urban property could collapse very quickly. People will then only want to RENT property for as long as they feel their urban jobs are secure. Rapid jobs losses and a collapse of sectors in the economy (finance? retailing? tourism?) can bring about a very rapid collapse in housing and the health of the economy. Within a few weeks or months of when a financial collapse begins to feed on itself, signs of commercial collapse may start to be seen. Energy blackouts, and empty store shelve may be an early sign that a deeper collapse is arriving.

 

Most people without jobs, will hang on wherever they think they are likely to get fed. Such people will not be reasonable targets for mortgage lenders (an intentional understament), nor will they be very popular as tenants - since the government's ability to sustain housing benefits to such people may come into doubt as its credit status deteriorates. Of course, the government can just PRINT the required money, but at some stage such action will simply accelerate the loss of currency value - which in turn will force up food and energy prices, making it more difficult for state handouts to cover the living costs of dependent individuals.

 

These dire possibilities bear thinking now, since decisions can be made today to bring one into a less vulnerable living environment.

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This thread really touches accord with me. My journey started in 2005 when I became peak oil aware leading from my environmental interests. A camper van holiday to Ireland that summer cemented my fears and since that time I have put our financial house in order, nothing since that date has led me to believe I have made unwise choices or followed the wrong path. Many thanks go to sites such as this for a perspective counter to main stream media.

To date we now have a substantial holding in real assets including agricultural land which I am working hard and using skills learnt in my youth to develop into a functioning farm, the farm has no associated debt and we aim to create a closed loop food system, at the heart a large forest garden was planted in 2009.

My land in SE England was bought in Nov 2008 for a knock down price due to fortunate timing on my part as no-one was at the auction. Since July I have been developing the farm fulltime whilst my wife works for a motor manufacturer, we both realise her job won’t last forever though her income now is very useful.

We have already built up a body of friends old and new who help us from time to time and a customer base who buy products from us direct from the farm gate. These people will be favoured as demand increases, if times develop into the scenarios described here then I guess these people will be regarded as our tribe. So my advice would be to get supporting someone who works in agriculture as soon as possible either physically or economically.

 

Thanks again to the regular contributors to this site

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There are transition towns in the UK preparing for peak oil and the associated economic collapse. One near me is Totnes.

 

I have set up a renewable energy installation company that has started with Solar PV but we are adding a new technology to our capabilities next week and aim to add further ones as quickly as possible to offer a broad range of choice for our customers. One customer is looking at three technologies with us. Awareness is growing locally and demand is very good.

 

 

http://www.transitiontowntotnes.org/

 

http://www.transitiontowntotnes.org/conten...economic-crisis

 

Have you ever thought something might not be quite right with the economy?

 

That may sound like an obviously dumb thing to be asking right now, but many people were asking this question when Transition was first getting going back in the more buoyant years of 2005 and 2006. While we felt a lot more prosperous back then, many were concerned that our economy lacked resilience. People were saying how the economic system on which we now depend was poorly equipped to deal with shocks such as sudden rises in oil price, or energy shortages.

 

In fact our economic growth, as it is widely understood, is utterly linked to increase in energy use. It always has been.

 

Transition challenges the idea that we need to get back to economic growth, in conventional terms. Transition proposes new ways to regenerate the economy by making things much more local again and really cutting down on how much our businesses and services depend on fossil fuels. This could be hugely economically advantageous to our local communities, with significant potential for more local skills and employment.

 

 

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There are transition towns in the UK preparing for peak oil and the associated economic collapse. One near me is Totnes.

 

I have set up a renewable energy installation company that has started with Solar PV but we are adding a new technology to our capabilities next week and aim to add further ones as quickly as possible to offer a broad range of choice for our customers. One customer is looking at three technologies with us. Awareness is growing locally and demand is very good.

 

 

http://www.transitiontowntotnes.org/

 

http://www.transitiontowntotnes.org/conten...economic-crisis

 

Have you ever thought something might not be quite right with the economy?

 

That may sound like an obviously dumb thing to be asking right now, but many people were asking this question when Transition was first getting going back in the more buoyant years of 2005 and 2006. While we felt a lot more prosperous back then, many were concerned that our economy lacked resilience. People were saying how the economic system on which we now depend was poorly equipped to deal with shocks such as sudden rises in oil price, or energy shortages.

 

In fact our economic growth, as it is widely understood, is utterly linked to increase in energy use. It always has been.

 

Transition challenges the idea that we need to get back to economic growth, in conventional terms. Transition proposes new ways to regenerate the economy by making things much more local again and really cutting down on how much our businesses and services depend on fossil fuels. This could be hugely economically advantageous to our local communities, with significant potential for more local skills and employment.

 

 

Transition Towns are a good start, from my experience the people who attend are very well meaning and very informed , they can certainly hold a great meeting and organise some great speakers. Nicole Fosse at ours no less! However many lack any experience in the daily realities of day in day out phyiscal graft or are dreamers who think we can forage our way out of this mess. Ours have a community allotment that in the past one working class bloke would have tended to on his own at the weekends and evenings after a hard days manual work...

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There are transition towns in the UK preparing for peak oil and the associated economic collapse. One near me is Totnes.

 

I have set up a renewable energy installation company that has started with Solar PV but we are adding a new technology to our capabilities next week and aim to add further ones as quickly as possible to offer a broad range of choice for our customers. One customer is looking at three technologies with us. Awareness is growing locally and demand is very good.

 

 

http://www.transitiontowntotnes.org/

 

http://www.transitiontowntotnes.org/conten...economic-crisis

 

Have you ever thought something might not be quite right with the economy?

 

That may sound like an obviously dumb thing to be asking right now, but many people were asking this question when Transition was first getting going back in the more buoyant years of 2005 and 2006. While we felt a lot more prosperous back then, many were concerned that our economy lacked resilience. People were saying how the economic system on which we now depend was poorly equipped to deal with shocks such as sudden rises in oil price, or energy shortages.

 

In fact our economic growth, as it is widely understood, is utterly linked to increase in energy use. It always has been.

 

Transition challenges the idea that we need to get back to economic growth, in conventional terms. Transition proposes new ways to regenerate the economy by making things much more local again and really cutting down on how much our businesses and services depend on fossil fuels. This could be hugely economically advantageous to our local communities, with significant potential for more local skills and employment.

 

 

Hello Confounded, where art thou? I am based in SW close to Dartmoor. Not far from where you are it seems.

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Modern Dentistry is so much based on oil. If oil is gone, so will every bit of modern dentistry as we know it. If there is one advise that I would give, is learn the skill to floss. you would be surprised how many people do not have this skill. Not perhaps the top 10 skills to have, but it would be there among the top 100.

 

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This thread really touches accord with me. My journey started in 2005 when I became peak oil aware leading from my environmental interests. A camper van holiday to Ireland that summer cemented my fears and since that time I have put our financial house in order, nothing since that date has led me to believe I have made unwise choices or followed the wrong path. Many thanks go to sites such as this for a perspective counter to main stream media.

To date we now have a substantial holding in real assets including agricultural land which I am working hard and using skills learnt in my youth to develop into a functioning farm, the farm has no associated debt and we aim to create a closed loop food system, at the heart a large forest garden was planted in 2009.

My land in SE England was bought in Nov 2008 for a knock down price due to fortunate timing on my part as no-one was at the auction. Since July I have been developing the farm fulltime whilst my wife works for a motor manufacturer, we both realise her job won’t last forever though her income now is very useful.

We have already built up a body of friends old and new who help us from time to time and a customer base who buy products from us direct from the farm gate. These people will be favoured as demand increases, if times develop into the scenarios described here then I guess these people will be regarded as our tribe. So my advice would be to get supporting someone who works in agriculture as soon as possible either physically or economically.

 

Thanks again to the regular contributors to this site

Sounds good ae. You are well on the road. I'm looking to do the same here in Japan. Do you rear animals? And do you imagine a time when your wife will not need to work? ie can you make a 'go' of it or is this just a step yo self sufficiency? In most of the developed world this is the main problem IMO.

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10 Skills Needed to Thrive in a Post-Collapse World

"a post-apocalyptic Mad Max-type world"

 

Dont forget the oldest skill, seduction ;)

 

But also, without law and order, you could do with some defensive/tactical etc type skills (just like ol max!)

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Sounds good ae. You are well on the road. I'm looking to do the same here in Japan. Do you rear animals? And do you imagine a time when your wife will not need to work? ie can you make a 'go' of it or is this just a step yo self sufficiency? In most of the developed world this is the main problem IMO.

 

Self sufficiency was our main aim first, but as time as progressed we have expanded to sell to others. We have two large polytunnels which produce a large array of veg. On the animal side I have a herd of rare breed pigs including five sows and a boar their pigs are sold as halves direct to customers and we make a variety of sausages. Trouble is pigs depend on a lot of bought in feed, we are trying to remedy this by growing more food for them. We also have a hens, ducks, turkeys and geese.

 

What you up to in Japan?

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Self sufficiency was our main aim first, but as time as progressed we have expanded to sell to others. We have two large polytunnels which produce a large array of veg. On the animal side I have a herd of rare breed pigs including five sows and a boar their pigs are sold as halves direct to customers and we make a variety of sausages. Trouble is pigs depend on a lot of bought in feed, we are trying to remedy this by growing more food for them. We also have a hens, ducks, turkeys and geese.

Wow, sounds great.

 

Have you ever come across the Tiny farm blog?

 

http://tinyfarmblog.com/

 

I followed them for a year or two when I first got interested in growing my own.

 

They have a neat model where they sell the future produce created in each sq ft patch of their land to punters prior to growing the veg.

 

Not sure, but I think there might be a similar system in UK?

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<b>1. Organic Gardening and Seed Saving:</b> Skills involving food production will be the most valuable in a post-collapse society. Learning to grow your own food is a must. Obviously, it is necessary to feed your family, but you will also be able to trade your abundance for other items. Additionally, learning to save seeds will also provide another excellent means of trade.

 

 

Great site here http://www.realseeds.co.uk/about.html

 

Ordered my seeds and educational material.

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