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Have you Bought the Farm yet? Where?

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I heard an item about Brazil no longer allowing foreigners to but Brazilian farms

 

I wonder if this will be a new trend ?

 

 

I think it may be better to be in your native land during a depression IF you have a smaller fund. Who knows what capital controls or new legislation based on nationality may be enforced on foreign nationals.

 

 

 

this is why we decided to sell our French place doc. It was cgnao who made me think about the future possibility of land/property being taken away from us OR what about travel restrictions etc. Just look at the US travel restrictions now, you need to book any flight 72 hours in advance. I think they have set a precedent and it will only get worse. We will see the same restrictions in the UK no doubt...

 

Far too many future problems for me to worry about, I prefer less worry if possible.

eidted to add - perhaps slightly different of course, if you have married a local.

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I'm sure it will. I wonder how the Chinese are buying property in Japan? I had thought you had to be a permanent resident( hard) here. Perhaps they have relaxed the rules for hot cash injections?

Does Chris talk about this in his book? Does he buy through a Japanese agent? by the by did you finish the book? And any thoughts? Is he buying now?

I did finish it.

But havent gotten around to writing a review yet.

 

He is selling his Industrial space in HK now - sale agreed, but not closed yet. (3x-4x profit, I think.)

So I think he will "go shopping" after he gets paid.

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I did finish it.

But havent gotten around to writing a review yet.

 

He is selling his Industrial space in HK now - sale agreed, but not closed yet. (3x-4x profit, I think.)

So I think he will "go shopping" after he gets paid.

Nevermind the review, just tell me when it is time to buy. Not just yet I take it?

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Yes and No. I am thinking laterally. Any area with a good source of water will always attract attention. How long can you keep it hidden? Besides the cost of petrol will be insanely high which would mean the extra traveling would put a lot of strain on the finances. You wont be technically self sufficient even though you will have food on table, water to drink, clothes to wear. There will always be things you will need.

True.

 

I wasn't thinking of totally out of the way/isolated. Perhaps an area with a low population density, say a few miles away from a large town.

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I think you'd want to be near-ish a market town.

That sounds about right.

 

Maybe the old way of life will come back into fashion.

I hope so to a certain extent. The village where my Dad's farm is (and where I grew up) used to have such a sense of community. Everyone in the village knew each other and helped each other out. Now it's full of 'wealthy' (?) individuals (no offence intended at all) and the spirit has died.

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That sounds about right.

 

 

I hope so to a certain extent. The village where my Dad's farm is (and where I grew up) used to have such a sense of community. Everyone in the village knew each other and helped each other out. Now it's full of 'wealthy' (?) individuals (no offence intended at all) and the spirit has died.

The car killed any village commutable from London. Then the housing boom buried the ability for the old ways to continue. In the future that process might be unwound to an extent. But there has been a lot of knowledge lost, I'd imagine.

When I see the Cotswolds I now want to be sick.

This has not happened in Japan. The timing of the bubble blowout scorched everyone and made it difficult to hang on to one house, nevermind a second.

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Migrating to Poland?

 

Bloomberg has a story about people "from Europe" moving to Poland.

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That sounds about right.

 

 

I hope so to a certain extent. The village where my Dad's farm is (and where I grew up) used to have such a sense of community. Everyone in the village knew each other and helped each other out. Now it's full of 'wealthy' (?) individuals (no offence intended at all) and the spirit has died.

 

http://www.marketoracle.co.uk/Article22781.html

The key to understanding The Invisible Man is the dual setting of the story. The novel largely takes place in the rural village of Iping and other rustic parts of England. But in Griffin's flashback narrative of how he became invisible, the scene shifts to the urban metropolis of London. The Invisible Man turns on the contrast between life in a small village and life in a big city. In fact, despite all the novelty of its science-fiction premise, The Invisible Man explores territory already quite familiar in nineteenth-century British literature, from William Wordsworth to Thomas Hardy. Like a Romantic poet or a Victorian novelist, Wells juxtaposes the tradition-bound, community-oriented existence of a rural village with the anomie and rootless cosmopolitanism of a modern metropolis. In moving from London to a country village, Griffin creates the dramatic tension in the story, a confrontation between antithetical ways of life.

 

As Wells describes Griffin's situation: "His irritability, though it might have been comprehensible to an urban brain-worker, was an amazing thing to these quiet Sussex villagers."[5] Wells portrays Iping as a tightknit community: everybody knows everybody else, and indeed everybody minds everybody else's business. The citizens of Iping are close minded and superstitious, easily upset by anything that might disturb the regularity of their existence. In the opening pages of the novel, Griffin arrives in Iping as the quintessential stranger, unknown to anyone in the village and visibly alien by virtue of his grotesque appearance in a disguise calculated to conceal his invisibility (one of the locals even speculates that Griffin may be racially distinct from the townsfolk).[6]

 

In these circumstances the only thing that gets Griffin accepted in Iping is money. The novel opens with a prototypical market transaction. Griffin gets a room at the inn, not because of "human charity" as he at first suggests, but because of his ability to "strike" a "bargain" and pay the going rate.[7] Money in and of itself already confers a kind of invisibility on Griffin. Even in a town of busybodies, he is able to remain anonymous. As nosy as the innkeeper, Mrs. Hall, is, she does not even bother to learn Griffin's name as long as he pays his bills on time.[8] Indeed, money buys a lot of maneuvering room for Griffin. His strange and reclusive habits arouse the suspicions of the narrow-minded villagers, some of whom believe that he must be a criminal hiding from the police.[9] But at least in the case of Mrs. Hall, Griffin is able to calm her down whenever she complains about the damage he has done to his lodgings with a simple offer to pay for it: "Put it down in the bill."[10] As Mrs. Hall herself says, "He may be a bit overbearing, but bills settled punctual is bills settled punctual, whatever you like to say."[11]

 

We thus see how money transforms a traditional community. The citizens of Iping are used to dealing face-to-face with people well-known to them; as one of the villagers says, "I'd like to see a man's face if I had him stopping in my place."[12] But a complete stranger is able to live among them by virtue of the power of money, which stands for the impersonal working of the market.[13] One would think that Wells would welcome this power as a force for progress. As he himself demonstrates, a market transaction allows perfect strangers, who may even have reasons to be hostile to each other, to cooperate for their mutual benefit.

 

Money seems to be a way of greatly expanding the range of social interaction. And in Wells's portrayal, villages like Iping certainly look as if they could use some broadening of their horizons. On the whole, Wells treats the villagers comically, making us laugh at their conventionality and superstitiousness. Nevertheless, he seems to take their side, accepting their way of life as the measure of normality and presenting the Invisible Man as the sinister figure, the one who in his secretiveness and obsessive concern for privacy disrupts the peaceful functioning of the village community. Wells reserves his truly sharp criticism for the modern city, for London.

 

In the London section of the narrative, Griffin's invisibility oddly comes to symbolize the weakness and vulnerability of modern man, the way he becomes a non-entity under the pressure of mass society, the way he gets lost in the shuffle of the urban crowd, turning into a sort of "nothingness."[14] In contrast to the later cinematic versions of the story, Wells from the beginning tends to emphasize the disadvantages of invisibility. Griffin has of course high hopes for what his invisibility will allow him to do, but once he actually becomes invisible, almost the first thing he discovers is how much trouble his new condition is going to cause him. Emerging triumphantly into the streets of London, expecting to "revel in [his] extraordinary advantage,"[15] Griffin finds himself instead buffeted by the mass of people in the big city: "But hardly had I emerged upon Great Portland Street … when I heard a clashing concussion and was hit violently behind…. I tried to get into the stream of people, but they were too thick for me, and in a moment my heels were being trodden upon."[16]

 

Hoping to be a god in the eyes of his fellow Londoners, Griffin at first finds that he is quite literally nothing to them; they walk right into and over him. Griffin's invisibility is simply an extreme case of a common urban problem. Many nineteenth-century novelists explored the anxiety of the individual threatened with the loss of his identity in a mass society. Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground is perhaps the best example. Like Griffin, Dostoevsky's protagonist suffers the indignity of having people walk right by him on a St. Petersburg street as if he were nothing.[17]

 

Griffin's invisibility thus becomes a striking image for everything Wells is trying to show about the impersonality of the market economy. In the small village of Iping, Griffin's problem is that all eyes are upon him; everybody wants to butt into his business. His problem in London is just the opposite; in the big city he is completely ignored. Griffin himself eloquently describes the unfeeling, uncaring character of the big city:

 

I had no refuge, no appliances, no human being in the world in whom I could confide…. I was half minded to accost some passer-by and throw myself upon his mercy. But I knew too clearly the terror and brutal cruelty my advances would evoke…. Even to me, an Invisible Man, the rows of London houses stood latched, barred, and bolted impregnably.[18]

 

In contrast to Iping, London is a thoroughly impersonal community, in which no one knows anybody else, or at least a man can be virtually unknown to his next-door neighbors. Wells seems to suggest that even without his fiendish experiments, Griffin would be in effect invisible in London. Wells uses invisibility in this metaphorical sense in his later novel Tono-Bungay (1908) when he describes the situation of a young student who comes to London and finds himself lost in the crowd:

 

In the first place I became invisible. If I idled for a day, no one except my fellow students (who evidently had no awe of me) remarked it. No one saw my midnight taper; no one pointed me out as I crossed the street as an astonishing intellectual phenomenon.[19]

 

The modern urban metropolis is a peculiarly attenuated form of community, in which people live together but have very little in common. Wells emphasizes this point by giving Griffin "an old Polish Jew" as a landlord in London,[20] who speaks Yiddish at a key moment.[21] London is not simply a paradoxical community of strangers; it is in fact a community of foreigners, who sometimes do not even speak the same language.

 

For Wells, then, to be invisible in London is to be an individual in a vast, impersonal market economy, which provides no genuine roots or community and which hence turns a man into a purely necessitous being. Throughout the story Griffin is surprisingly obsessed with the basic human needs: food, clothing, shelter.[22] He ends up embodying everything Wells finds wrong in capitalist existence. With nothing to stabilize his life, Griffin is always on the go, unable to find rest. He is continually scheming against his fellow human beings, always trying to take advantage of any situation. In particular, he encounters all the problems of the emancipated individual in the modern enlightened world. Griffin is a scientist, a man who tries to live by reason alone and who rejects all traditional religious beliefs. The villagers are particularly upset by the fact of his "never going to church of a Sunday."[23]

 

Wells emphasizes the fact that the Invisible Man is at war with traditional values by a peculiar and gratuitous turn in the plot: Griffin's symbolic murder of his father. In order to get the funds he needs to pursue his experiments, Griffin robs his father of money that does not belong to him; in disgrace, the old man shoots himself. The scene of the funeral of Griffin's father is one of the most powerfully realized moments in the book. Wells associates the death of Griffin's father with the modernizing forces that are despoiling the countryside and destroying the traditional English way of life:

 

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Good article - thanks.

 

Capitalism may succeed in allowing consumers to acquire the goods they want, but it prevents people from enjoying them. Indeed, by generating an infinity of desires and involving consumers in an unending process of acquisition, the market economy, in this view, dooms them to perpetual dissatisfaction.

 

I stopped there as I may read the book instead.

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INSPIRATION ?

 

(What inspired me to start this thread?

I attended a Google Adsense Partners seminar in Hk last week, and there were two guys from a site called Thai Visa. They told me how active their site was, and it occurred to me that it might be interesting to do a GER podcast on a subject that could be of interest to both websites - On something like "Buying a property in Thailand."

 

I finally got around to visiting their chatboard, and indeed it is very active. One thread seemed to be similar to this one, and so I thought I would record the Opening Post here):

 

What Will You Do When Becoming Old And Dependent ? - bangkokcitylimits

 

Just curious,

 

some are blessed with a very good wife, but when not or when single what to do when becoming old and eventually physically or mentally dependent ? Stay here, and how, or choose to go home ? What you think may be the benefits or disadvantages of both ?

 

oldman703959.jpg

== ==

 

(a response): - Ian Forbes

 

It depends on whether I become a burden to others or not. I've got some cyanide squirrled away should I ever need it. My father died at 87 in a hospital bed because he no longer wanted to live after mother moved him out of his home and both of them into one of the old folks residences. He no longer wanted to live and just stopped eating. Eventually, he just dried up and his body functions stopped working. My mother died about 2 years later... pretty much the same way. I wish I could go quicker, but we are not allowed to commit suicide in Canada... even if we want to. Our Canadian government spends more on keeping old people barely alive than they do on any other expense.

 

As one guy said... I want to die just like grampa... quietly in his sleep. Not screaming in terror like the 5 people in the car that grampa was driving

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Hmm.

 

There's a strategy called the "international man" notion, or Perpetual Tourist - which involves becoming almost invisible to tax authorities

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SEEDS !

 

This has popped into my head for some reason.

 

Does anyone here have experience with buying SEEDS online?

 

If so, what do you look for in a supplier

 

TOOLS !

... is another idea that interests me

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SEEDS !

 

This has popped into my head for some reason.

 

Does anyone here have experience with buying SEEDS online?

 

If so, what do you look for in a supplier

 

TOOLS !

... is another idea that interests me

Lots of good info in the Chris martenson 'What should I do' pages.

 

Are you planting up the balcony? :lol:

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SEEDS !

....

TOOLS !

... is another idea that interests me

 

I have very little interest in and knowledge of seeds, however, the tools sale market is extremely competitive at present and any spike of demand due to economic downturn can be very easily abosorbed by the current online & high street retailers. Some will do much better than the others. Ken Hoover mentioned this topic of tools and car parts retailers on Tom O'Brien show a couple of months ago. I believe he named a few.

 

US can be a better place for such investments, because there are very few people in the UK who can do their cars themselves and those who have knowledge and skills might struggle to find space to repair their cars/boats/lawn mowers etc. You lived in the UK and probably noticed how small and inpractical UK houses are in comparison to the US.

 

 

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Hmm.

 

There's a strategy called the "international man" notion, or Perpetual Tourist - which involves becoming almost invisible to tax authorities

I like the idea of the villager......... with a cosmopolitan mindset. :lol:

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Lots of good info in the Chris martenson 'What should I do' pages.

Are you planting up the balcony? :lol:

Thanks, Jake.

No balcony here.

I am evaluating these guys as an advertiser:

PlantMeNow :

plantme.gif

http://www.awin1.com/awclick.php?mid=3012&id=107043

 

( Check out their SALAD BAR page )

I have a London based Italian friend who grows things on his balcony for his own salads.

 

free-delivery.jpg

They have free delivery for Pds.60 of seeds. That seems like a Huge number.

But maybe there are some specialty seeds that could have great value.

 

Putting the right seeds together with the right land and the right diet is an interesting challenge

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Absolutely correct. Unless there is a clear path laid out, buying a farm and starting to make preparations will be a incorrect thing to do. Perhaps it is a bit too late now to start. However, there could be such a high demand for such land which is close to water source, then the price might still be reflected in the future price even if it is priced in gold/silver. Perhaps buying a farm now (with all the requirements that go with it) might not essentially be a bad thing to do.

 

On a side note, what would be the things one would look at prior to purchasing a farm land?

1. Water

2. Proximity to a trunk road

3. close knit community/large extended family with lots of hands.........perhaps a new topic in its own right.

 

This post, RH's farm post and GOM's partner post has touched a nerve.

 

Autumn 2007 we sold up in England and moved to Scotland to rent while looking for a country property/small holding. Autumn 2008 a 5 bed farmhouse and 200 acres came up for sale at £650k. The price and acreage was more than I wanted. Not long after it was split into 3 lots £340k for the house and 1 acre, £50k for 18 acres at the side and £200k for 180 acres. I wanted the house and acres around it but my partner wasn't keen. It was only 1 mile from a trunk road but up a hill with a poor quality unsurfaced road up to it. My big mistake was that we walked up to it instead of just booking a proper viewing. The road was her main sticking point thinking about deliveries and when family visited. I eventually talked her round into at least viewing it, phoned up and it had just gone under offer. Re point 1 above it had private water and point 3 it was 1 mile from my cousin his wife and 4 kids.

 

For £390k someone bought the house and 40 acres around it. I could have paid cash for it and there isn't a day I don't regret it. What was particularly galling was that it was on the hill in front of where we were renting for the next 18 months! Every morning I opened the curtains and saw it. On a night I could see the lights in the conservatory!

 

Since then we have moved back to rent in England. I now know that part of her reluctance to buy it was she was already having doubts about being so far from her family. She had finished work because we moved up there and I think renting, not having projects to do and being so far from her family wore her down. Had we bought it, she would have had more things to do and might have settled.

 

I haven't done anything of any use with the cash.

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This post, RH's farm post and GOM's partner post has touched a nerve.

 

Autumn 2007 we sold up in England and moved to Scotland to rent while looking for a country property/small holding. Autumn 2008 a 5 bed farmhouse and 200 acres came up for sale at £650k. The price and acreage was more than I wanted. Not long after it was split into 3 lots £340k for the house and 1 acre, £50k for 18 acres at the side and £200k for 180 acres. I wanted the house and acres around it but my partner wasn't keen. It was only 1 mile from a trunk road but up a hill with a poor quality unsurfaced road up to it. My big mistake was that we walked up to it instead of just booking a proper viewing. The road was her main sticking point thinking about deliveries and when family visited. I eventually talked her round into at least viewing it, phoned up and it had just gone under offer. Re point 1 above it had private water and point 3 it was 1 mile from my cousin his wife and 4 kids.

 

For £390k someone bought the house and 40 acres around it. I could have paid cash for it and there isn't a day I don't regret it. What was particularly galling was that it was on the hill in front of where we were renting for the next 18 months! Every morning I opened the curtains and saw it. On a night I could see the lights in the conservatory!

 

Since then we have moved back to rent in England. I now know that part of her reluctance to buy it was she was already having doubts about being so far from her family. She had finished work because we moved up there and I think renting, not having projects to do and being so far from her family wore her down. Had we bought it, she would have had more things to do and might have settled.

 

I haven't done anything of any use with the cash.

 

Don't beat yourself up, let it go, that's in the past.

 

I missed a house that sold at auction last week, was prefect for me, needed work,right price,right area, i could have paid cash done all the work myself and still had money left over. I never attended the auction through my own stupidity so missed the chance to bid. To be honest i thought it would go for more and the uber bear voices where shouting at me. When i looked at the auction results i was almost sick.

 

I'm to cautious and have learnt the hard way.

 

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Thanks, Jake.

No balcony here.

I am evaluating these guys as an advertiser:

PlantMeNow :

plantme.gif

http://www.awin1.com/awclick.php?mid=3012&id=107043

 

( Check out their SALAD BAR page )

I have a London based Italian friend who grows things on his balcony for his own salads.

 

free-delivery.jpg

They have free delivery for Pds.60 of seeds. That seems like a Huge number.

But maybe there are some specialty seeds that could have great value.

 

Putting the right seeds together with the right land and the right diet is an interesting challenge

 

I did some digging on seeds.

This seemed a good deal, although us based:

Ready Store seeds

 

300k basic seeds. Enough to keep you going!

 

 

 

 

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I did some digging on seeds.

This seemed a good deal, although us based:

Ready Store seeds

 

300k basic seeds. Enough to keep you going!

 

We bought a fairly decent pad with 1 acre. Never going to be enough for farming, but not too far off what we will need to self-sustain with veggies, fruit and some meat in a few years time.

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This post, RH's farm post and GOM's partner post has touched a nerve.

 

Autumn 2007 we sold up in England and moved to Scotland to rent while looking for a country property/small holding. Autumn 2008 a 5 bed farmhouse and 200 acres came up for sale at £650k. The price and acreage was more than I wanted. Not long after it was split into 3 lots £340k for the house and 1 acre, £50k for 18 acres at the side and £200k for 180 acres. I wanted the house and acres around it but my partner wasn't keen. It was only 1 mile from a trunk road but up a hill with a poor quality unsurfaced road up to it. My big mistake was that we walked up to it instead of just booking a proper viewing. The road was her main sticking point thinking about deliveries and when family visited. I eventually talked her round into at least viewing it, phoned up and it had just gone under offer. Re point 1 above it had private water and point 3 it was 1 mile from my cousin his wife and 4 kids.

 

For £390k someone bought the house and 40 acres around it. I could have paid cash for it and there isn't a day I don't regret it. What was particularly galling was that it was on the hill in front of where we were renting for the next 18 months! Every morning I opened the curtains and saw it. On a night I could see the lights in the conservatory!

 

Since then we have moved back to rent in England. I now know that part of her reluctance to buy it was she was already having doubts about being so far from her family. She had finished work because we moved up there and I think renting, not having projects to do and being so far from her family wore her down. Had we bought it, she would have had more things to do and might have settled.

 

I haven't done anything of any use with the cash.

Sorry to hear .... that sounds tough. The consolation may be though that there should be many more buying opportunities arising in the future. With a squeeze on the over-extended middle classes, loads of property should be coming onto the market at a later date at a much better price. It will be interesting to see how long it will take before property starts moving, and the cascade down begins.

 

Desire is an interesting one. There have been some things I've really desired in the past, rushed in to buy, and soon regretted. Regret can cut both ways. A solution I've found, in my particular case, is to foster a "zen-like" detachment towards property/ stuff [a personal technology of sorts to counter-act the continual bombardment and false signals of property ramping by the media :lol: ]. A practical measure which has gone a long way to making this possible was the purchase of gold. Like land, it's also a real asset... and I consider it liquid land... to be swapped at some point for the real thing. This also deals with any anxiety that may be involved with holding a large amount of the local currency. Puts another spin on the tin [gold] foil hat theory.....

 

reading_minds_signs_devices.jpg

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Yes, bought farms years ago. Not too far from Faber actually.

 

Need to dump resi land now and go all in agricultural (another 150 rai, fingers crossed), mad at myself as rubber is making serious money now, about 10p a day per tree net.

 

Only fear is water shortages which we are now experiencing with increasing frequency each dry season, but hopefully completion of the Mekong dams projects in years to come will sort that out and provide the electricity for my PC.

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With the restrictions on foreigners owning land here (in Thailand), a lot of expats tried to get around it by setting up Thai limited companies and purchasing the land that way but the authorities have cottoned on to that loophole. Now they insist that the majority shareholder of any Thai limited company buying land must be a Thai national.

 

Thais don't like second hand properties. They tend to insist on new. Farangs (foreigners) don't seem to mind but with the fundamental drivers of this year's bloody protests still unresolved, not to mention the significant weakening of dollar, sterling, euro et al, far fewer Westerners are coming to live here. Loads of retired expats have headed back to their homelands as their pensions or foreign income simply doesn't buy what it used to.

 

If a farang wants to buy a house AND the land it sits on, he has to buy it in the name of his Thai wife but Thai women can be somewhat er . . . mercenary in their attitudes. Hundreds of guys get hitched, buy or build a house on land in wife's name, then get served with divorce papers after falling into a honeytrap - usually set up by the wife :lol: - and she gets to keep the house and the land.

 

For me, the biggest obstacle to buying property here is the fact that the King of Thailand is in very, very poor health. If he dies, this place may kick off in a way that makes the unrest earlier this year look like a picnic. Still, if that were to happen, I'd jump into the SET big time. Companies like PTT would probably be going for a song.

 

 

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With the restrictions on foreigners owning land here (in Thailand), a lot of expats tried to get around it by setting up Thai limited companies and purchasing the land that way but the authorities have cottoned on to that loophole. Now they insist that the majority shareholder of any Thai limited company buying land must be a Thai national.

 

Thais don't like second hand properties. They tend to insist on new. Farangs (foreigners) don't seem to mind but with the fundamental drivers of this year's bloody protests still unresolved, not to mention the significant weakening of dollar, sterling, euro et al, far fewer Westerners are coming to live here. Loads of retired expats have headed back to their homelands as their pensions or foreign income simply doesn't buy what it used to.

 

If a farang wants to buy a house AND the land it sits on, he has to buy it in the name of his Thai wife but Thai women can be somewhat er . . . mercenary in their attitudes. Hundreds of guys get hitched, buy or build a house on land in wife's name, then get served with divorce papers after falling into a honeytrap - usually set up by the wife :lol: - and she gets to keep the house and the land.

 

For me, the biggest obstacle to buying property here is the fact that the King of Thailand is in very, very poor health. If he dies, this place may kick off in a way that makes the unrest earlier this year look like a picnic. Still, if that were to happen, I'd jump into the SET big time. Companies like PTT would probably be going for a song.

 

Ah, I know!

 

It's wonderful, locks them all out of the market.

 

Unless you have kids. There is no age of majority when it comes to owning freehold land. My six year old is a multi, multi-millionaire.

 

It will kick off, but not for long. Not sure whether the incoming incumbent will let me stay, he doesn't like the colour of my skin see. That said, the kids will be fine, which is all that matters.

 

Do you live here?

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Ah, I know!

 

It's wonderful, locks them all out of the market.

 

Unless you have kids. There is no age of majority when it comes to owning freehold land. My six year old is a multi, multi-millionaire.

 

It will kick off, but not for long. Not sure whether the incoming incumbent will let me stay, he doesn't like the colour of my skin see. That said, the kids will be fine, which is all that matters.

 

Do you live here?

 

Yeah. Bangkok

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