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Japanese Property - Lessons from the Long Correction

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Just peeked at that foreclosed site. Some places there are more than a steal.Its nice to see all the info in English too. Usually the foreclosed sites are laborious to work through.

This though would be your ticket to cheap apts in/near Tokyo.

 

I would be very wary of buying anything without a good understanding of the location. Especially in anywhere as specialized an area as the Tokyo Basin. And if one bought foreclosed upon property I would employ an agent to run the management side of things. I wonder if Chris goes into this in the book or whether he comments more on buying for oneself as opposed to bagging a few rental investments? I look forward to his insights.

Is Chris now resident in HK, I wonder? How does he feel Tokyo vs HK, on all levels. It is great to get these 'people' inputs from Erik T and hopefully Chris D. Such observations are extremely valuable IMO, fresh and insightful and they work to counter opinions of those who have been long term residents and maybe somewhat tainted or biased without the luxury of comparison. Mmm.. plenty of food for thought, recently.

 

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I would be very wary of buying anything without a good understanding of the location. Especially in anywhere as specialized an area as the Tokyo Basin. And if one bought foreclosed upon property I would employ an agent to run the management side of things. I wonder if Chris goes into this in the book or whether he comments more on buying for oneself as opposed to bagging a few rental investments? I look forward to his insights.

Is Chris now resident in HK, I wonder?

How does he feel Tokyo vs HK, on all levels. It is great to get these 'people' inputs from Erik T and hopefully Chris D. Such observations are extremely valuable IMO, fresh and insightful and they work to counter opinions of those who have been long term residents and maybe somewhat tainted or biased without the luxury of comparison. Mmm.. plenty of food for thought, recently.

Yes, he is resident in HK.

From what I know (from his public speeches), he lives in a property that he renovated,

and he also renovated an industrial/factory space, which he now uses as his office/ for Dillon Communications.

 

From his experience, I take it that he is not afraid of managing such a project in Japan.

 

 

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Big numbers in Japan...

 

Just using figures ive found on the internet

 

 

http://www.globalpro...n/Rental-Yields

 

http://www.payscale..../Salary/by_City

 

an 80 sqm apartment in tokyo $996,320 USD, median wage in tokyo $65,526 USD.  15x income? A small 1 bedroom apartment 40sq m, 435,000 usd?  London prices are less, but so are the salary multiples...

 

http://www.finfacts.ie/costofliving.htm

London is only the 16th most expensive city...

 

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... moved from the Gold thread...

The community of Oseto-Cho, about an hour drive outside of Nagasaki on the coast, was one of the better communities that I lived in. People worked together and shared their knowledge and learning. The area was sustainable with most families having fields to plant rice and many households had Mikan (orange) trees in their yard. It was some of the best fruit and vegetables I have ever eaten (watermellon, strawberries, oranges, pears, apples).

 

We were lucky in that some key members in the community had worked overseas for NGO's and were happy to include us gaijin in the community - this may not be the case everywhere in Japan. Still, I think Japan could be a great place to live if you find the right place.

 

Edit: the gold thread may not be the best place for my two cents on Japan. Hope I didn't bore anyone.

 

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Chris Dillon's book on Hong Kong /

LANDED - Expatriates Guide to Buying & Renovating Property in Hong Kong

 

Excerpts: http://www.amazon.com/Landed-expatriates-b...0298&sr=1-6

 

Shows he was unafraid of buying older properties and renovating them.

 

He did three:

1/ Office in Central : (Mar./Apr.2002) + 1mo.

... Purchase Price..... : $ 1,060K

... Transaction costs : $ 0,015K

... Design/Contractor : $ 0,173K

... Other costs .......... : $ 0,xxx K

... TOTAL cost .......... : $ 1,264K / 1,000sf = $1,264 psf

 

2/ Apt. in Pokfulum : (Oct./Dec.2004) + 3mos

... Purchase Price..... : $11,000K

... Transaction costs : $ 0,523K

... Renovations ........ : $ 1,040K

... Other costs .......... : $ 0,xxx K

... TOTAL cost .......... : $12,622K / 2,200sf = $5,737 psf

 

3/ Unit, Wong Chuk Hang : (Apr./May.2005) + 1mo.

... Purchase Price..... : $ 1,880K

... Transaction costs : $ 0,033K

... Renovations ........ : $ 0,292K

... Other costs .......... : $ 0,007 K

... TOTAL cost .......... : $ 2,213K / 3,500sf = $0,632 psf

 

Chris has done a great job here.

His timing was superb, and the renovation work was done quickly, and at a low budget.

The result: three highly rentable / or usable properties owned at a very cheap cost.

 

Compare: Baguio Villas, in Pokfulum:

zzzzc.png

 

I circled when he bought his Pokfulum flat - brilliant timing !

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Questions for Chris Dillion, from the Wealth Measurement thread:

 

There is a very good podcast on Kunstlercast with JAIME CORREA from about a year ago. He sees the future as small urban communities and rural settlements. He finishes the podcast with the words ''what you are going to do is by choice, today; or by fate, tomorrow''...

 

Japan presents other opportunities, however. (as would the US with the prices you are now seeing in some places?)

You could have the rural settlements feeding-urban communities (feeder towns for the main cities). Land and property there is already cheap, what is missing is the realization of how the future is going to work. There is nothing like a hungry stomach to help you realize this. A good investment now could be agricultural land and those cheaper second hand apartments like we discussed in KJ shi, outside of Tokyo/or outside Detroit or wherever.

 

Please start a thread after you have met CD, must be coming up soon? I have a question...

+ Regarding the role of oil for Japan's future prospects. How does he see Japan's future on this front?

A rocky road where she is unable to secure enough oil- or simply can't afford it- or busy developing other alternatives.

 

Nearly every new home here has solar power now. it is basically standard. Population is declining from here on in and energy demand will fall away as we all drive our Prius's and shower in the thermal waters.

 

Japan is downsizing, naturally. There could be a lot going for it...as other parts of the world start to run into her problems of 20 years ago. That being said I don't think we are totally out of the woods and into spring just yet.

 

Good question, Jake.

I will plan to ask it tomorrow, and/or may ask Chris to visit this thread.

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Questions for Chris Dillion, from the Wealth Measurement thread:

 

 

 

Good question, Jake.

I will plan to ask it tomorrow, and/or may ask Chris to visit this thread.

 

I wonder if Chris lets the worries about future oil affect his business plan..or lets others worry about events out of our control.

 

Bubb, if you see another shock in the markets a la Lehman effect, then this would presumably be the time to buy Japan.

 

Please put that to Chris as I guess that would release a load more property onto the market of the sort you like, or are interested in here.

 

Thanks,

J.

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Bubb, if you see another shock in the markets a la Lehman effect, then this would presumably be the time to buy Japan.

Please put that to Chris as I guess that would release a load more property onto the market of the sort you like, or are interested in here.

Thanks, J.

His first buy in HK, was early:

But was not disastrously so, and was also his smallest investment.

The other two were immediately in profit

 

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Landed: The guide to buying property in Japan (Perfect Paperback)

~ Christopher Dillon (Author)

41HfKbxqW7L._SL500_AA300_.jpg

I had an interesting lunch with Chris Dillion (author of LANDED-Japan).

 

I bought the book, and will be reading and reviewing it in the near future.

 

Chris believes the present buying opportunity in Tokyo, Japan may be as good as the one that he took advantage of in Hong Kong, back in 2002 and 2004. (He has made up to 4x his money on those investments.)

 

He thinks that smaller flats, within the Green (?) line on the Tokyo subway system are the most interesting.

 

In reference to Jake's question. He is not too worried about Japan's oil exposure, since he believes that the Japanese are true survivors, and can cope well with dramatic price swings. And he thinks that Japan will cope well with its own debt crisis, since most of the debt is owed to Japanese investors, so it can be neatly sorted out within the country.

 

The biggest challenge for Japan is its demographics challenge, and any investor in Property there needs to think about this carefully. For him, the answer is to focus on Central Tokyo, since people are moving to the city from the rest of Japan, and so demand there should remain solid. He is less bullish on the cities ringing Tokyo, since people may be deserting them.

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I had an interesting lunch with Chris Dillion (author of LANDED-Japan).

 

I bought the book, and will be reading and reviewing it in the near future.

 

Chris believes the present buying opportunity in Tokyo, Japan may be as good as the one that he took advantage of in Hong Kong, back in 2002 and 2004. (He has made up to 4x his money on those investments.)

 

He thinks that smaller flats, within the Green (?) line on the Tokyo subway system are the most interesting.

 

In reference to Jake's question. He is not too worried about Japan's oil exposure, since he believes that the Japanese are true survivors, and can cope well with dramatic price swings. And he thinks that Japan will cope well with its own debt crisis, since most of the debt is owed to Japanese investors, so it can be neatly sorted out within the country.

 

The biggest challenge for Japan is its demographics challenge, and any investor in Property there needs to think about this carefully. For him, the answer is to focus on Central Tokyo, since people are moving to the city from the rest of Japan, and so demand there should remain solid. He is less bullish on the cities ringing Tokyo, since people may be deserting them.

Very interesting insight. Especially about smaller flats (better yields I imagine and in fashion (no kiddie couples, singles, pensioner interest)).

Did you talk about another possible dip thanks to another gloobal stock market deleveraging possibility?

Japanese are survivors and tough as old boots but if the oil, or lack of it, becomes a problem lets not forget that Japan is 99% dependant on imports.

I have also outlined that I think people worldwide will flock to the cities looking for employment. However they could be marching out of there pretty quick when life becomes difficult. Where are they going to go? The countryside with its abundance of food. Now might be a great time to buy Tokyo; it might also be a great time to sell and buy land instead as the big supermarkets are doing.

I hope he is right regarding the debt not being a problem but interest rates could well rise here, kicking off our K spring (I imagine that is how it will come).

 

Good info though. How long is he looking to hold his investments? Will Chris join us here for some follow up?

 

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Good info though. How long is he looking to hold his investments? Will Chris join us here for some follow up?

There's a chance he may posts here, since he does monitor references to his book.

But it might help if more people were posting here.

 

Any lurkers out there?

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Hi Bubb,

 

The green line you mentioned is the Yamanote train line, which circles central Tokyo (more here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yamanote_line). Cities within the Greater Tokyo Area (which includes Saitama, Kanagawa and Chiba) may also be worth a look.

 

Given Japan's dependence on imported energy, oil prices are always an issue. But the Japanese economy (like U.S.) is far less dependent on manufacturing, and therefore oil, than it was even a decade ago. Higher oil prices would hurt, but the rapidly shrinking, aging and concentrating population is a bigger concern.

 

Farmland is an interesting long-term opportunity, but beware shrinking rural populations (and the associated contraction in the local tax base and service cutbacks) and land use restrictions.

 

If your readers are interested in learning more, I will be making a presentation at the Foreign Correspondent's Club in Hong Kong on July 13. Details are here -- http://www.fcchk.org/fccweb/news.html?id=4...7783EA2901CF8E6 -- and I have alerted the FCC to the typo in my biography.

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Hi Bubb,

 

The green line you mentioned is the Yamanote train line, which circles central Tokyo (more here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yamanote_line). Cities within the Greater Tokyo Area (which includes Saitama, Kanagawa and Chiba) may also be worth a look.

 

Given Japan's dependence on imported energy, oil prices are always an issue. But the Japanese economy (like U.S.) is far less dependent on manufacturing, and therefore oil, than it was even a decade ago. Higher oil prices would hurt, but the rapidly shrinking, aging and concentrating population is a bigger concern.

 

Farmland is an interesting long-term opportunity, but beware shrinking rural populations (and the associated contraction in the local tax base and service cutbacks) and land use restrictions.

 

If your readers are interested in learning more, I will be making a presentation at the Foreign Correspondent's Club in Hong Kong on July 13. Details are here -- http://www.fcchk.org/fccweb/news.html?id=4...7783EA2901CF8E6 -- and I have alerted the FCC to the typo in my biography.

 

Hi Chris,

Thanks for your knowledgeable input on this thread. Would you agree that the bottom of real estate prices, thus far-ehem-was just post Lehman 'shock' as the Japanese term it? Don't you envisage more 'shocks' on the horizon? I have a feeling we could see another bottom to come yet for property, even within the Yamanote Line prime real estate market?

I basicallly would agree with you on paper that now looks a good time to buy and there are plenty of incentives recently from the goverment to get on the ladder. However I am wary on two counts. One is, as I have said, another reaction to future shocks globally and the other is the question of oil and the effect it would have on Japan. I feel the Japanese on the whole are aware and steeled for the former but have no idea about the oil problem nor how to navigate that problem. Sure, I am looking down the road a bit, but these events could be brought forward very quickly and be very damaging to the economy here and thus property and indeed to the larger cities, even Tokyo. I can see many families returning to their countryside roots/extended families with just the father remaining hopefully employed in Nagoya or Chiba or Osaka, Tokyo, etc...IF an oil supply problem occurs-which it will eventually-I shudder to think of the lack of preparedness in Japan's economy. I figure a whole lot more people will be forced to relocate to the country. Families will just get on with that (the Asian way) and the continuing boom in self sufficiency will become a way of life.

 

The Japanese are good at adapting, far better than the West, and that might be a very useful trait. Also the old ways of life haven't been forgotton in the country, there is an abundance of water, wood and workable land. Still running it with limited oil will be a problem revisited like in the past.

 

OK, just switching back to Yamanote line again for a second. What kind of prices are you looking at as a 'buy'? And do you consider only new apartments or are happy to convert/retrofit older places? It would be useful to see how long your investment horizon is. I am presuming 10 years mimimum? I would also be very interested in your personal feelings of Tokyo vs Hong Kong as a place to live, people etc etc...Erik Townsend recently had a great podcast on Hong Kong (and mentioned 2047 when HK returns fully to China). Maybe that's nothing to worry about and is too far away to worry about now...,maybe like my fears on oil for Japan-too unknown to worry about.

 

Thanks for taking time out to visit GEI. I will be buying your book shortly.

 

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Hi Chris,

Thanks for your knowledgeable input on this thread. Would you agree that the bottom of real estate prices, thus far-ehem-was just post Lehman 'shock' as the Japanese term it? Don't you envisage more 'shocks' on the horizon? I have a feeling we could see another bottom to come yet for property, even within the Yamanote Line prime real estate market?

I basicallly would agree with you on paper that now looks a good time to buy and there are plenty of incentives recently from the goverment to get on the ladder. However I am wary on two counts. One is, as I have said, another reaction to future shocks globally and the other is the question of oil and the effect it would have on Japan. I feel the Japanese on the whole are aware and steeled for the former but have no idea about the oil problem nor how to navigate that problem. Sure, I am looking down the road a bit, but these events could be brought forward very quickly and be very damaging to the economy here and thus property and indeed to the larger cities, even Tokyo. I can see many families returning to their countryside roots/extended families with just the father remaining hopefully employed in Nagoya or Chiba or Osaka, Tokyo, etc...IF an oil supply problem occurs-which it will eventually-I shudder to think of the lack of preparedness in Japan's economy. I figure a whole lot more people will be forced to relocate to the country. Families will just get on with that (the Asian way) and the continuing boom in self sufficiency will become a way of life.

 

The Japanese are good at adapting, far better than the West, and that might be a very useful trait. Also the old ways of life haven't been forgotton in the country, there is an abundance of water, wood and workable land. Still running it with limited oil will be a problem revisited like in the past.

 

OK, just switching back to Yamanote line again for a second. What kind of prices are you looking at as a 'buy'? And do you consider only new apartments or are happy to convert/retrofit older places? It would be useful to see how long your investment horizon is. I am presuming 10 years mimimum? I would also be very interested in your personal feelings of Tokyo vs Hong Kong as a place to live, people etc etc...Erik Townsend recently had a great podcast on Hong Kong (and mentioned 2047 when HK returns fully to China). Maybe that's nothing to worry about and is too far away to worry about now...,maybe like my fears on oil for Japan-too unknown to worry about.

 

Thanks for taking time out to visit GEI. I will be buying your book shortly.

 

Hi Jake,

 

My target is small apartments (typically +/- 20 square meters) in 30-year-old buildings within comfortable walking distance of key train or subway lines. With a little research you can find these for about US$100,000, and it is possible to achieve gross yields of 7-12%. Typically these places come with a sitting tenant, so there is little need to retrofit. Note that the attraction here is the generous yield. I don't think there is much potential for capital appreciation.

 

I have a deep appreciation for Japan, but I don't think I could live there again. For all of its charms, I have a higher quality of life in Hong Kong and Hong Kong is much more entrepreneur friendly.

 

It would take a cataclysmic event for people to return to the countryside in any great number. Most young people regard the countryside (and its inhabitants ) with distain, and would move there only under the most extreme of circumstances.

 

Best

 

Chris

 

 

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Hi Jake,

 

My target is small apartments (typically +/- 20 square meters) in 30-year-old buildings within comfortable walking distance of key train or subway lines. With a little research you can find these for about US$100,000, and it is possible to achieve gross yields of 7-12%. Typically these places come with a sitting tenant, so there is little need to retrofit. Note that the attraction here is the generous yield. I don't think there is much potential for capital appreciation.

 

I have a deep appreciation for Japan, but I don't think I could live there again. For all of its charms, I have a higher quality of life in Hong Kong and Hong Kong is much more entrepreneur friendly.

 

It would take a cataclysmic event for people to return to the countryside in any great number. Most young people regard the countryside (and its inhabitants ) with distain, and would move there only under the most extreme of circumstances.

 

Best

 

Chris

 

Thanks Chris. So basically second hand 1R/1K rent ~10MAN (guessing..) That IS small! But I understand the greatest return/yield is there, perhaps.

 

I certainly agree it would take a cataclysmic event for people to return en masse to inaka. I know some city residents laugh about the country and the country folk. That is the funny part. Many young Japanese are woefully unprepared for their future, should it include a FC or BFC environment in which they are helpless victims. Stripped of their mobiles, idols and trendy fashions the majority of them are utterly vacuous and rendered totally useless, IMO. Still they make useful, docile tenants, I suppose. ;)

 

What are your thoughts on reposessions? I have seen some shockingly cheap places in Tokyo which seem too good to be true. Would you avoid or go full throttle?

 

Once again, many thanks!

Jake.

 

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...Many young Japanese are woefully unprepared for their future, should it include a FC or BFC environment in which they are helpless victims. Stripped of their mobiles, idols and trendy fashions the majority of them are utterly vacuous and rendered totally useless, IMO. Still they make useful, docile tenants, I suppose. ;)

Jake.

To translate, for Chris's benefit

 

FC = Financial Collapse, such as we saw in 2008, and as may be repeat this year (2010 or 2011)

BFC = Beyond Financial Collapse, which is:

 

+ What may happen after that, and even more adverse scenario, where

+ Blackouts, or interruptions of water, gas, or other utility services may occur, or

+ Food scarcities may hit

+ Energy prices may shoot up, forcing people to use far less

 

If food becomes scarce, living in the countryside, in a farming community, may be a smart idea.

 

I can refer you to various threads here about these scenarios

 

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To translate, for Chris's benefit

 

FC = Financial Collapse, such as we saw in 2008, and as may be repeat this year (2010 or 2011)

BFC = Beyond Financial Collapse, which is:

 

+ What may happen after that, and even more adverse scenario, where

+ Blackouts, or interruptions of water, gas, or other utility services may occur, or

+ Food scarcities may hit

+ Energy prices may shoot up, forcing people to use far less

 

If food becomes scarce, living in the countryside, in a farming community, may be a smart idea.

 

I can refer you to various threads here about these scenarios

 

Thanks for the additional info, Bubb.

 

There are opportunities in foreclosed property, particularly outside Tokyo.

 

But foreclosures come with their own unique complications. See (see: http://landedbook.com/?page_id=684)

 

Best

 

Chris

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Jake,

 

I have started reading CD's book, and I plan to write a review of it. I am 2-3 chapters into it, and I can see it will be a useful read for me, and should help me greatly to clarify my thinking about where and how I might invest in Japan.

 

Since you plan to buy the book also, I will share some of my notes (so far) with you:

 

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

LANDED - Japan

===========

 

Global property boom - has turned into a bust.

It has already been a bust in Jpan for a long time

 

Hard to get info - Dillon's book addresses this gap. Designed to help those obtain enough info to make an intelligent buying decision - The paperback book is expensive. But is well worth $xxx, if you are seriously interested in buying property in Japan. A mistake might cost you 100x or 1,000x that much, or more. And this book will improve your chances of making a successful investment.

 

...Takes the bull by the horns, or rather the bear, and begins the book by facing the realities of Japans negative Demographics situation (At 1.21, Japan's estimated 2009 fertility rate ranked 218th out of 224 countries - far below the replacement rate of 2,33.) But Japan remains ahead of Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, and Hong Kong - in births, but not in attracting foreign residents. Instead of encouraging more immigration, to counter the demographic bust, the Japanese government is paying them a bonus (Y300k, about $3,000) to leave, and over 40,000 brazilians have taken advantage of that scheme. This program is popular, since many japanese blame foreigners for certain social problems.

 

Despite these problems, the populations in three principle cities, Tokyo, Osaka, and Nagoya is growing. Tokyo had net immigration of over 150,000 people in 2008, and that is where dillion thinks one should focus one's property investments. "Tokyo is a transport, commercial, and cultural hub... these businesses and institutions will support long term demand for homes in central locations and near train and subway stations."

 

Japan's population crisis is concentrated in rural areas, Out-migration is shrinking the tax base, and hospitals and train stations are being closed. Rural property can be an attractive investment, but CD recommends that buyers do their homework.

 

The procedure for buying a property in Japan is logical bit complex. CD takes you through all the steps, and points out some of the potential pitfalls, that foreign buyers may miss, like the impact that a death at the property may have on its market value. Transaction costs run high, he recommends a budget of about 7-8%...

(that's about where I am so far - I will give less detail on his specific strategies, so people have a reason to buy the book.)

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

 

On another point, you have sent me a PM, asking what I thought of a strategy of investing in small flats in Central Tokyo. I think you are worried that living in a small flat may be "soul destroying." Well, as you may or may not know, I live in a 750sf flat in HK with my partner. and both she and I like living here. The fact that the flat is well designed and the furnishings and storage were carefully planned helps. So does the view (from one of the top floors), and the excellent facilities. So small flats, do not necessarily mean a low quality of life.

 

What I think is really soul destroying, is a long commute, since for someone who works long hours, this will leave them with almost no "free time" to have a personal life.

 

Maybe by choosing the "better" flats, and even investing a bit in improving them, you can offer potential tenants an enhanced living arrangement, and even earn a better yield by doing that.

 

From Chris's first book, I see that he has been very clever and budget conscious in doing renovations in HK. I think he has in mind something requiring less hands on efforts in Japan. But I shall have a much better sense of that when I finish his book, in maybe 2-3 weeks.

 

In answer to another question in your Personal Message: Chris is from Canada. I really enjoyed meeting him, chatting and giving him a little your of Tai Kok Tsui, near where I live. I do think we will meet again, and discuss more about Japan when I have finished the book. His overall approach is to look for markets that have fallen out of favor, and so have become cheap relative to past valuations. That is true certainly in Japan. The big and obvious risk is the Demographics. The idea of focusing on Central Tokyo, which is still attracting people, seem like a smart way to cope with that risk.

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Japan land down 8% last year.

 

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/nb20100702a1.html

 

Land prices plunged 8% in 2009

Kyodo News

 

Land prices sank by an average of 8.0 percent in 2009 as the rise in office vacancies following the global financial crisis threw cold water on the real estate market, the National Tax Agency said Thursday.

 

As of Jan. 1, the price of land in Japan had fallen in all 47 prefectures to an average of ¥126,000 per sq. meter, the agency said, or 2.5 points greater than in 2008, when prices also fell nationwide...

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Global property boom - has turned into a bust.

It has already been a bust in Jpan for a long time

 

I expect one more drop to the bottom with a crashing global stock market. Another barrage of repossessions. This will kill off the green shoots of recent investors. Then will be the time for property here.

January 2013 might be good, if we're all still here. :lol:

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Japan land down 8% last year.

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/nb20100702a1.html

Land prices sank by an average of 8.0 percent in 2009 as the rise in office vacancies following the global financial crisis threw cold water on the real estate market, the National Tax Agency said Thursday.

As of Jan. 1, the price of land in Japan had fallen in all 47 prefectures to an average of ¥126,000 per sq. meter, the agency said, or 2.5 points greater than in 2008, when prices also fell nationwide...

Most of the top Japanese property co's fell too.

 

Here are four of my favorites stocks to watch

 

Sumitomo Rlty&Dev / JP:8830 .. update

xx

 

Nippon Building Fund / JP:8951 .. update

xx

 

Global One R.E. Investment / JP:8958 .. update

xxxg.gif

 

Nomura R.E. Office Fund / JP:8959 .. update

xx

 

/Self-updating charts : http://www.advfn.com/cmn/fbb/thread.php3?id=6107612

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Most of the top Japanese property co's fell too.

 

Here are four of my favorites stocks to watch

 

Sumitomo Rlty&Dev / JP:8830 .. update

xx

 

Nippon Building Fund / JP:8951 .. update

xx

 

Global One R.E. Investment / JP:8958 .. update

xxxg.gif

 

Nomura R.E. Office Fund / JP:8959 .. update

xx

 

/Self-updating charts : http://www.advfn.com/cmn/fbb/thread.php3?id=6107612

Do you have charts going back to the 90's? It would seem that those 2008 lows may well be broken if we see another global collapse, which I believe we will see this year or next.

I fail to see how Japanese property won't be spared another hammering, despite wanting to turn upwards. Perhaps Prechters 2014-16 will bring the global lows in just about everything, everywhere. Any thoughts on this?

The self updating advfn charts needs a password.

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Check the Link:

/Self-updating charts : http://www.advfn.com/cmn/fbb/thread.php3?id=6107612

 

I will send you a User Name and Password by PM.

(Anyone else need one.)

 

It is free to join, so if you like it, why not sign up there

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Japan Foreclosed Property 2010 - Buy this 3rd edition report!

 

Are you aware that you can buy a house & lot in Japan for as little as $10,000. Surprising but true! Japan has a plethora of cheap properties subject to auction by the courts. Some are in rural areas subject to depopulation, but there are plenty of properties in the cities too. I bought a dormitory 1hr from Tokyo for just $US30,000. Below are listed some of the current opportunities to buy VERY CHEAP foreclosed properties in Japan. I bought foreclosed properties in Japan and now I reveal all in this expanded 180-page report. eg. The information you need to know, strategies to apply, where to get help, and the tools to use.

 

Japan Foreclosed Property 2010 eBook - Download here a copy of the table of contents or purchase from online store for just $US19.95.

 

/see: http://foreclosured.blogspot.com/

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