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S60R

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About S60R

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  1. Very interesting read, thank you. I might be overly cautious here, but I would have thought that getting hold of a great valuable asset is one thing, but being able to execute nicely on the production is bound to require a very different set of skills and knowledge for a company whose "principal business is the identification and evaluation of mineral assets for exploration"y and how can one monitor a quality of such execution? The only thing that springs into my mind would be watching the price action and volumes but the good opportunity might be long gone once the graph becomes more or less conclusive.
  2. It will be a resistance level, for sure, however, if we try to correlate the current volume levels with the volumes that existed at $4.00-level 2.5 years ago then, I feel, it might not necessarily be a strong resistance. From your experience, what is the "expiry time horizon" for junior miners and for stock in general, when the previous resistance levels can be disregarded? 3 years? or more?
  3. We have seen it now, Big move today and the volume gradually grows as you thought. It would be nice if it retracts a bit for another good entry point..
  4. Thank you for the find DrBubb !!! Fulfills Stan Weinstein's strong buy criteria, apart from the fact that that the stock is not very liquid at all.
  5. S60R

    Commander T's Diary

    As far as I know, no-one mines rhodium. It's too rare to be mined on its own. It's a by-product of mining Pt and a bit of Rh can be extracted from Nickel production. If I remember correctly then there are 10 mined oz of gold for each 1oz of Pt , and for 10oz of Pt for 1oz of Rh. i.e. the ratio of mined Rh/Au is one to a hundred. The price ratio or Rh/Au fluctuates from 1 to 10 and at present it's @ 0.9, but was as low as 0.7 in mid-December 2013.
  6. S60R

    Commander T's Diary

    Yes, the buy price at Kitco is $1125, sell price $1025 XRH0 0.1ouce units are @115. It becomes more common to see the XRH0 price being higher than the one from Kitco. In one extreme situation that disparity was at 10%. I recon it doesn't make any sense to buy ETF if the physical metal is cheaper, unless it is a short term speculative purchase. The good point about XRH0 is that it has never been below the price of 0.1 ounce. so there is of course counter party risk, possible liquidity issues, @notanewmember or anyone experienced with the ETFs. Can you, please, comment and advise on how to assess the health of the XRH0 and how to spot any possible problems? Many thanks in advance
  7. S60R

    Commander T's Diary

    There is a good article on the reasons behind that nasty fall in Rh prices in 2008 http://www.resourceinvestor.com/2008/08/21/can-one-mans-actions-take-6-billion-in-value-out-o XRH0 had a nice run up of 30% in late December2013 - early January 2014 but then the XRH0 volume dried up and I am concerned about some noticeable price disparities between XRH0 and the physical Kitco prices. Kitco's "sell-buy" spread is big, 10% at present levels, XRH0 can trade with much much lower spread and the fix price can be anywhere within the Kitco spread range. In early January, the XRH0 price shot above Kitco "sell" price by 10 % and shortly after that the volume dried. I think this goes to show that the currrent amount of investors in the Rh market is very low. The industrial demand is not there yet, I think there was a good industrial demand with the introduction of the emissions norms such as Euro3, 4, 5 etc, when lots of new "unused" ounces of Rh needed to be used in cars catalytic converters. Now, 10-15 years later, recycled Rhodium is fed back into the market and the supply seems to be steady and predictable. i.e. there is much bigger portion of industrial Rh in circulation and therefore there is less dependency on the supply of the "brand new" Rh from South Africa and Russia.
  8. When are you planning to visit Buxton and surroundings? As JD mentioned, it's a very nice place but certain activities are very weather permitting and you would benefit from having a plan "B". I live 15 miles away from the place, please, feel free to drop me a PM if you would like some suggestions. It might be a better idea to rent a car as there are very many nice little places around that are very hard to reach using trains & buses. Buxton on its own is unlikely to take more than a day of your time.
  9. Indeed, the bigger the better, but the cost increases rather drastically There is a discussion below the video where the cost of one of these turbines producing 6MW (rather intermittently) is comparable with the cost of the nuclear sub reactor producing 300MW including fuel. Wind Power has its role to play, however, I think amongst all green technologies the concentrated solar power is the future. Has anyone done any research on the best way how one can invest in it?
  10. This type of design has been around for a long while. There are a number of engineering issues: 1) Structural strength and fatigue issues, 2) amount and type of materials that need to be used, 3) Promised increase in efficiency in real conditions will not be achieved since the turbines are tested in wind tunnels that have their own walls -> this causes some extra channelling of the flow. It's cheaper to double the power output by making the blades 1.4 times longer - that's why we see the increase in turbine heights and diameters. The tulip-design look beautiful, however, from engineering point of view it's close to being insane.
  11. S60R

    Lithium

    It looks like a laser beam in the downward direction all the way through 2011. It is, however, at a key resistance point now with good volume exhaustion for the downtrend and higher volume on the way up now. In addition, the ABC structure on the way down from January 2010 is nearly complete. Lots of junior Lithium companies had a good bounce from December 2011 lows. The question is: how long is it going to last?
  12. Interesting. John stated that the valuation of the senior mining company should be around 3 * (annual cashflow). If I understood John correctly, any valuation below or above that criteria makes it either undervalued or overvalued. Right? As far as Juniors are concerned: the assessment is somewhat different because there is some substantial capital needed to open production and the formula is 3 * (annual cashflow) = valuation + capital needed i.e. valuation = 3 * (annual cashflow) - capital needed, which, according to John, can result in negative valuation and this makes such juniors very unattractive and risky. The bit that I don't understand is that any junior which does not have its production open is likely to have negative valuation due to negative cashflow and needed capital. According to this criteria, any junior becomes unattractive.. Am I missing something? Any other comments how to research and analyse mining stocks? Thanks in advance
  13. S60R

    THE GEI TRADING TEAM thread

    Ninjatrader is the best one I found where you can save your charts, keep the track and monitor tbe balance of your account (whether real or fictitious), do a lot of technical analysis, develop and apply trading strategies. You can use it for free in a simulation account and even if you are doing it for real it is very suitable to use for the swing trading. It will take a couple of days to get into the first gear though. Personally, I will be monitoring the team portfolio using this tool.
  14. Very many thanks, DP, for this post and for the PM. I truly appreciate this. Apologies for not replying sooner I am just so busy at the new place... running like a headless chicken; however, just 2.5 months later I like it even more here. I am finding the links with the stats being particularly interesting and am going through them rather slowly. Swedish is still a problem but I am making some progress. Local.se is a great source of information in English though. It was the engineering business that brought me here and I am amazed how many companies and industries are here. It looks very prosperous and pleasantly busy in comparison to the UK. I am not sure about the "slight dip" though. I've heard quite a few unpleasant stories about 2008 and I am just somewhat worried how it might play out if the second leg of the downturn comes around. All of the car, lorry, tractor & boat manufacturers as well as the mining and processing industries might (just might) find it hard to go through it and the strong kroner is not going to help if/when the global economy sends its "present" across to the Swedish shores. Nice double top and not far from the upper part of the ascending channel. True, and it would make a perfect sense for me to continue renting for a bit longer. Apartments are very spacious and seem to be fairly affordable 3-4 times annual income. The houses in the cities or by the sea are fairly expensive. When I have a bit more time I will try to follow DrBubbs recommendations and review the historical price and price/(annual earnings) ratios just to see where the market is likely to go from here. They are indeed and I really like them. Always did. Tack så mycket!
  15. I had a job-related move to Sweden from the UK a month ago and, surprisingly, I like absolutely everything about this country. No doom and gloom, well, at least I have not noticed it. The economy and SEK are very strong, everything moves regardless of the amount of snow, it looks very industrial, not overpopulated, prosperous, no benefit fraud (compared to the UK scales) and low unemployment. People pay more tax here but get much more in return too. This is something I don't mind doing, especially taking the cost of childcare into account 800GBP/child in the UK & equivalent of 80-100GBP/child in Sweden. The property prices are very similar to the UK ones with the only exception that the same amount of money can buy many more square metres. The salary even after Swedish tax is ~20-30% higher (mainly due to strong SEK). Keeping this in mind and assuming that the childcare costs are next to nothing, I just wonder what is considered to be a healthy annual income multiple which one can prudently borrow. Asking my Swedish colleagues, I could not get a decent answer, it's all the same UK story about prices constantly either going up or being steady. So I understood that some local people got brainwashed here too and hej-hej: UK property porn programs are on all the time. Given that this site attracts a healthy amount of independently thinking people, I decided to through in a couple of questions: 1. What is a healthy mortgage/annual income ratio here. 2. Are there any underlying problems in the Swedish economy, society and is there anything to watch out for? My move to Sweden is temporary but I am really seriously thinking about making it permanent. Should there be any Swedes or people who emigrated to Sweden in the past, then I would deeply appreciate your comments. Many thanks in advance / Tack så mycket!
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