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romans holiday

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Everything posted by romans holiday

  1. romans holiday

    Trading Volatility, Ballasted by Gold

    A major factor in reading a continued down-trend is passage of time. Averaging the down-trends of the previous two [as seen on the longer term chart] you'd expect this one to last for 2 or 3 months. Current down-trend is only a month or so old.
  2. romans holiday

    Trading Volatility, Ballasted by Gold

    Down trend re-commenced?
  3. romans holiday

    A quasi-masonic nexus of "the people who know best"

    From the perspective of the ideal [as opposed to the real] the State is a state of mind. Think you are exploited, and you are. Freedom is not a political project, but an existential one; not a pre-existent right, but a potential personal achievement.
  4. romans holiday

    Who Is The Middle Class ?

    Always disliked the term 'middle class'. It conjures up images of complicity and mediocrity. Prefer 'working' or 'upper class', or a mx of the two [gentleman farmer anyone?], to the 'middle class' which tends to have a slavish state of mind towards money.
  5. romans holiday

    Anyone for COFFEE?

    Oh yes, definitely for coffee, makes the world go round. I used to roast beans in a wok, but restrain myself these days to a grinder and percolater. Gives the camper a lovely aroma, also saves over $2000 a year. That said, still frequent the coffee shop occasionally where I can access the internets.
  6. romans holiday

    Trading Volatility, Ballasted by Gold

    Pivotal point here. Am looking for the trend down to continue. However, if wrong and AGQ instead heads up towards near 60, will look at rebuying just below where it was sold. This reflects my medium/ long term bias to the upside.... over and above short term volatility.
  7. romans holiday

    Obama version 2.0 / God Bless America

    Go Obama! It has always amazed me that a civilized society ever managed to convince itself it didn't have to pay tax in order to support the state [or could minimize it]. Why so? Because a civilized person will happily pay their tax or tithe not only for the greater good, but for the very conditions which make the good life, the civil life, possible, ie, the state. Those that can afford to pay it, and resent it, are to my mind bordering on the barbarous. Since ideas make the world go round, I blame the French visionary Rousseau. He was the first to propogate the notion that society/ civilization corrupts an original and free 'human nature'. An obviously dated myth yet with plenty of naive adherents even today.
  8. Yep, don't you love the word 'transformation'. Observing the realization of potential. Perceiving bios not phusis, and then the transformation of mind. And finally, the transformation, by analogy, of lived experience. No wonder that the bourgoeis view of life tends to fence people off from nature; 'I think therefore I am, and i think I am a cog in the machine'.
  9. The urbanized rat is teachable. Unfortunately, my rat is a thoroughly rusticated rural one. Can't begrudge him that.
  10. What, of the rat? It comes out by stealth at night. To catch a photo of the little beggar, I'd need a very fancy set-up replete with a motion sensor. Might be easier to just buy a trap, and then provide photographic evidence of the rat and its demise. Or perhaps you meant of the garden. Not much to see there really, just a few ramshackle rows of the usual stock of vegetables. Have run out of room this year so will also be putting in another garden for the potatoes and corn. Will perhaps be able to provide a panoramic shot of the mature gardens in full swing in a couple of months time, I don't really approach gardening with self-sufficiency in mind, or from a purely economic perspective. More significant is to sense the flow of seasons, and to appreciate the rhythms of life. I met an accountant a while back [at brunch with the local parish] who mentioned he couldn't understand why his recently deceased multi-millionaire father bothered growing his own vegetables.. Here is a good 'bourgeois' example of the inablity to think outside the economic; quite sad really especially when it came to understanding his own father, who evidently took great joy in watching vegetables grow. As for the joys of vegetable watching, I find it helps to not look at them too often... the pleasure is maximized by looking at them only every third week or so. I wonder if there is a correlation here between gardens and markets.
  11. Nice surprise to see the winter garden with some growth at last. Summer garden is going in today; tomatoes, potatoes, beans, corn etc. May have to dig up some more lawn. Garden seems to look after itself well when I'm away though a rat has got into the blood and bone.
  12. romans holiday

    GOLD

    Gold down to 1670, back to the base of the cup.
  13. romans holiday

    GOLD

    double post
  14. romans holiday

    GOLD

    Gold down to 1670, back to the base of the cup.
  15. romans holiday

    Trading Volatility, Ballasted by Gold

    Yep, ir's still on track. Was a pleasant surprise the wake up and find AGQ had plunged from 52 to 46! My buy order is still in at 40, which could be only a few weeks away. Would love to post the latest chart, but photobucket is playing up.
  16. romans holiday

    Ayn Rand - Atlas Shrugged

    Yes, I prefer to see the ideas discussed rather than the person or group. That said, i wonder sometimes though about the structure of the old debate. You have two clearly defined positions squared of one against the other, and one tries to win against the other. Some would argue this is just perpetuating a rationalist/ abstract approach to thought. Take for example the clash between Capitalism and Marxism. From another perspective beyond the classic debate, the differences between Marxism and Capitalism are superficial for what both have in common is a worldview based on economics. And then curiously Capitalism carries out in practice what Marxism was unable to do by indoctrination. A basic tenet of Marxism is that the economic conditions determine the ideological/ conceptual ones. This has been most effectively achieved in Capitalism; the material aspect of life is ordered productively and economically, this in turn leads to an economic view of existence.
  17. romans holiday

    Ayn Rand - Atlas Shrugged

    Sure, 'the obliteration of thought' sounds exaggerated, but then to make a point you often have to use hyperbole. Mind you, I'm referring to the general state of culture, the quality of the 'mass mind'. As you point out, you will always find pockets of authentic thought... the problem is these are becoming increasingly specialized and isolated, and failing to 'filter down', or permeate the wider popular culture.
  18. romans holiday

    Ayn Rand - Atlas Shrugged

    Yes, it's quite odd. People should be putting down their Orwell, and picking up Huxley. In Aldous Huxley's 'Brave New World' you have a better picture with productivity, consumption, drugs, sex and distractions subversive of critical thought. The problem today is not an orthodoxy of thought, but its complete obliteration. Anecdotal evidence: On leaving a waterfront cafe [where I'd happened to write the previous post] I noticed a couple of toddler's absorbed in a children's book. In a large black heading on one page was 'Everybody works', and on the other was 'Mother works'!
  19. romans holiday

    Ayn Rand - Atlas Shrugged

    'To love money is to know and love the fact that money is the creation of the best power within you' Only an unabashed ideologue could say this. She must think, in extremely abstract terms, that the best in man [or essence] is his productivity.... homo economicus [see the similarity with the opposite ideology based on economics?]. Sure we produce, and we consume, but the best power in us?? As she suggests, we have the power to create, but this is quite arbitary and contingent on our power to think. It is the power of thought, which presupposes freedom, that is our best power. We are free to think up all sorts of ideologies, free to create such institutions as money, free to see them as mere tools. And free also to question and doubt them, to keep them at arm's length... lest we ourselves become cogs in the machine.Those mysterious powers have to trump the 'love of money'... don't you think? i don't think the love of money is the best 'power' in us. More like this 'love' is an addiction, and then an addiction to power. For you could say money is power. And if the love of it is an addiction you have lost your freedom.There is perhaps a Faustian pact involved here where one gains 'power' at the expense of freedom. Back to productivity. Cows are productive. They are happy to be farmed and kept safe and secure behind fences as long as they can readily consume fresh grass. As Kramer would say, 'I am not an animal!'
  20. romans holiday

    Ayn Rand - Atlas Shrugged

    “So you think that money is the root of all evil?” To start from this is a classic case of setting up a 'straw man'; easy enough to blow over. What any serious thinker would do is start from 'the love of money is the root of all evil', which then would make the contrary 'the love of money is the root of all good' look like the nonsense it is. Rand's thought is merely reactionary. It reacts against communism, and neither capitalism nor communism can hardly be taken as a wholeseome 'worldview'. Turning the market into an ideology is really just making the equal but opposite mistake of earlier ideologues. Perhaps saying 'money is the root of civilization' would make more sense. This would also keep open a critical/ moral space where we might speak of the problem of being 'overly-civilized' today.
  21. romans holiday

    Subliminal messages in our consumer world

    Freedom was once well defined as self-determination. To attain to a state of self-determination, one had first to meet the more basic needs. Once the needs were met and necessity removed from the picture, the conditions were had by which one was free to pursue higher aims and ideals. Thus, such things as property and wealth were considered as mere means to ulterior ends. And so civilization emerged with its economic base and its cultural superstructure, with economy a means to the proper ends of life. Culture could be thought of, from the economic perspective, as the building of a 'negative' space, the building of a wall within which is a clearing to 'cultivate your garden'. A technology of 'distancing' may be useful here. By all means enjoy the media for some time, but also have a means to be able to tune out, drop out, escape. I find being un-housed very useful for this, and then being un-urbanized also. When the media is either restricted, or non-existant, one is forced to appreciate the subliminal and sublime messages in Nature, or to pick up a book and read it. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e1ZUlzE4bAA&feature=related
  22. romans holiday

    Subliminal messages in our consumer world

    The camper 'lifestyle' is working well in the interim. The plan is to buy a larger one soon... a 6 berth veritable house on wheels. I was planning to also buy an apartment in the capital but am thinking twice about that now. For half the price you can get a much nicer house in the smaller towns not far from the capital. I could then commute when it suits. As for the container in the countryside, there is no way I want to develop that... it is a pure piece of primogenia [nature's primitive desires and habits]. As for the city, I can enjoy the urban life by free parking in the camper; the other week I was parked up on the harbour making my morning coffee when a few killer-whales cruised past. Often see seals.
  23. romans holiday

    Subliminal messages in our consumer world

    Deep? Funny that; was just reading some Roland Barthes this morning at the Auckland Art gallery overlooking the public park on a sunny day. Barthes 'aestheticizes' language, the essence of which is to enjoy skating along the surface. Are we all surface dwellers these days, or do we have the curiosity to see what lies beneath... or above? Nevertheless, Barthes is a good read for anyone interested in writing, and reading for that matter. As for the lifestyle, I've settled into a routine these days, where I spend three weeks in the capital and a then a week in the country. In the capital [Auckland] I part-time tutor English to the foreign students here, which pretty much covers living costs and then some. Every fourth week I take off to the container in the countryside, which I have set up into quite a comfortable little library. I live 24/7 in the camper, which gives me the mobility to enjoy the best of both worlds, the urban cultural space and then nature... anything but suburbia! Natural instincts? I think we have an egalitarian bundle of them, none being reducible to others, none being more 'real'. The task is to give them their due and harmonize all in your own life ... I hesitate to say 'lifestyle' as has a bit of a consumerist flavour about it. Back to deep. In Plato's vision we are already deep in a cave buried away from reality [if only we realized it]. Our cave is the cogito. The tradition of classical philosophy was about escape and return. Modern philosophy, in a Faustian pact, trades all that 'esoteric stuff' for the illusory idea of power. Illusory because we are all mere mortals, yet somehow with a notion of immortality.
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