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Thinking about Electricity Storage


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#41 John Doe

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Posted 09 September 2006 - 09:17 PM

Battery technology is improving at a rapid rate.

I know a few people working on the “SpeckNet” project (miniature, mm size sensors all linked together by their own radio network). One of their collaborators (big project) at St Andrews are responsible for the development of new batteries for these devices (ultra small, so the need to have a large capacity). They are making good progress and have improved lifetimes by 40% (apparently something in New Scientist about this too.)

Also, later this year, perhaps early next year, a new mobile battery will be released which has a rapid recharge capability, (seconds not hours) and a larger lifetime than current devices :) .
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#42 DrBubb

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Posted 10 September 2006 - 12:59 AM

the small batteries are great, and that seems to be where most of the progress has occurred

a big advance will come when they can extend these gains to larger batteries, suitable for cars, and home storage. there is fear about using lithium now because of their tendency to explode when they overheat
The market is "bipolar", swinging back and forth from a focus on Inflation to Deflation. Bet on swings; and stay flexible. What are bipolar markets? See: http://tinyurl.com/GEI-Manix

#43 DrBubb

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Posted 12 February 2007 - 08:11 AM

Greensaver Technology Corp.

...a Zhejiang based storage battery company has secured a $20 million investment from SAIF Partners, an Asian private equity firm, according to the National Business Daily.

Established in 1999, Greeensaver claims to be the world's only Silicone storage battery maker. Compared with conventional lead acid batteries, Silicone batteries are less corrosive, and more environmentally friendly.

The company says its products have been adopted in industrial sectors such as the automotive and railway sectors, and it is trying to tap the demand in the wind and solar energy sectors.

Greensaver will use the funding to expand its production capacity and boost its sales to $70 million by the year's end, compared to 2006 sales, which totalled several millions.

(China Business Weekly, Feb.12-18, page 4: VC/SME page)
The market is "bipolar", swinging back and forth from a focus on Inflation to Deflation. Bet on swings; and stay flexible. What are bipolar markets? See: http://tinyurl.com/GEI-Manix

#44 chas and dave

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 12:29 PM

Vycon flywheels

This thread has some good posts about flywheels.
I read over the weekend about this flywheel company that may come to AIM soon.


From the energy conservation perspective, I can imagine vehicles, wind turbines and other moving machinery would really benefit from this, an I suppose it hasn't happened because energy has been so cheap.
It would seem especially useful to tie up with a wind turbine. Are these in use, or do the turbines have re.atively small flywheels with direct energy production rather than storage?

What also occurs to me is how plain stupid we seem to throw away fossil fuels so readily.
Bring on higher prices ASAP.

Malco is usually good on these questions.

#45 DrBubb

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 08:32 PM

The next big thing in batteries
Exploding batteries light fire for alternatives, but don't expect to see them in laptops anytime soon.
By Grace Wong, CNNMoney.com staff writer
November 3 2006: 2:41 PM EST


NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- In the labs of major computer makers, academic institutions and start-ups, researchers are searching for the next big thing in laptop batteries.

From PC makers Hewlett-Packard (Charts) and Toshiba to Silicon Valley start-up Zinc Matrix Power, researchers are developing alternatives to the lithium ion batteries prevalent in today's laptops.


Major computer makers are recalling up to 9.6 million laptop batteries.


While many of these technologies have long been in the making, they're getting pushed into the spotlight due to the ongoing flap over lithium-ion batteries.

"The chances of alternative batteries gaining a foothold is much higher than a year ago before the issue with lithium ion batteries became mainstream," said Carmi Levy, an analyst with Info-Tech Research Group.

Nearly all of the major computer makers, including Dell (Charts) and Apple (Charts), are recalling up to 9.6 million lithium-ion notebook batteries manufactured by Sony (Charts) due to concerns they may overheat and cause a fire (see correction below).

Most recently, Fujitsu said last week that one of its laptops overheated and burned a user's hand.

One firm hoping to benefit from the safety issues raised by the recalls is Zinc Matrix Power. The company makes silver-zinc batteries that don't contain lithium or other flammable liquids, so they can't explode, CEO Ross Dueber said.

"Consumer electronics are bursting into flames. Is that really acceptable in terms of safety and brand awareness for device manufacturers?" he said.

Scariest tech of 2006
It isn't just safety concerns driving interest in alternatives. The consumer electronics industry has long been searching for a battery that can run longer on a single charge.

Toshiba - which also has recalled Sony-made lithium-ion batteries -has developed a prototype for a fuel cell laptop battery that generates power from a chemical reaction rather than being plugged into an electric outlet.

The prototype can run 8.5 hours and the company aims to have a working commercial product ready in 2008 or 2009, Toshiba product manager Duke Dang said.

While real demand for technology like fuel cells hasn't really kicked in yet, the recent fires show that people are pushing lithium ion to the limits, said Al Pan, a scientist with HP Labs, the research arm of the Silicon Valley computer maker, which also is working on fuel cell technology.

Industry experts said consumers aren't likely to find new types of batteries in laptops in the market for at least a few more years.

For one, lithium ion batteries are relatively inexpensive, and any new technology faces the task of producing at a price consumers have come to expect, analysts said.

Next year's coolest gadgets
Donald Sadoway, a professor of materials science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said it's often the case that new technology isn't greeted with open arms.

He's been researching lithium polymer batteries, which hold lithium in a solid state rather than liquid form, which makes them more stable and capable of withstanding more heat.

But consumers are more likely to see changes to existing lithium-ion technology before battery makers and computer makers make the leap to a completely new type of technology, Sadoway said.

Also, consumers are taking a "if it isn't broke, don't fix it" attitude and aren't really demanding alternatives, said Rob Enderle of technology consulting firm the Enderle Group.

While the number of batteries recalled has been staggering, the actual instances of fire has been rare. Dell recalled some 4.2 million batteries, but received only six instances of overheating.

Sony insists it's rare for a lithium ion battery to catch fire and has said it's introduced manufacturing safeguards to improve the safety of its batteries.

So far, the largest computer makers don't look to be shifting away from lithium ion. Dell said it's always evaluating new technologies but doesn't plan to move away from lithium ion batteries in its laptops.

And John Wozniak of HP Notebook Engineering said there aren't any real commercially viable alternatives out there yet. "Lithium ion is here to stay."

Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrected stated that HP is participating in the battery recall. CNNMoney.com regrets the error.

@: http://money.cnn.com...sion=2006110314
The market is "bipolar", swinging back and forth from a focus on Inflation to Deflation. Bet on swings; and stay flexible. What are bipolar markets? See: http://tinyurl.com/GEI-Manix

#46 Sonic the Hedgefund

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Posted 25 September 2007 - 07:28 PM

"Storage of electrical power is critical for the stability and robustness of the electrical grid, and it is essential if we are ever to use solar and wind as our dominant primary power sources. The best place to provide this storage is locally, near the point of use.


Why just store electricity? Electricity is primarily a means of transmitting energy from a remote source to the point of use. There are inefficiencies in every conversion.

What about PHOTONIC storage?

Lighting is one of the most significant uses of electricity, if a viable way can be found to store the photonic energy of the sun during the day, to be released at night, then this could make an enourmous contribution to solving the coming energy crunch.

Obviously it's simple in principal, but how could it be done in practice? phospherecent matereals are not efficient!

Any ideas? Does anyone know of any organisations looking into this?

#47 DrBubb

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 01:37 AM

PERFECT BATTERY? Not yet

Electric vehicles expected to dominate market by 2030

As 45% of greenhouse gas emissions come from transportation, there will be no solution to climate change without a replacement for the internal combustion.

In an interview on the same day, Nissan/Renault CEO Carlos Ghosn said his EV without battery would cost the same as a conventional car. The battery would be leased at a monthly fee, which along with recharging costs would be on par with fuel costs for conventional vehicles. When questioned about the battery’s short range, reported at 100 miles, Ghosn said that will improve with time. "If you wait for the perfect battery, you wait till 2030." Nissan/Renault has an agreement with Better Place, an Israeli based company, to develop a worldwide presence to lease EV batteries and build networks of stations for battery exchange and re-charge to extend the driving range.

The market is "bipolar", swinging back and forth from a focus on Inflation to Deflation. Bet on swings; and stay flexible. What are bipolar markets? See: http://tinyurl.com/GEI-Manix

#48 Wanderer

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Posted 12 December 2008 - 06:36 PM

A sort of storage - store it in a human till you need it....

http://www.telegraph...-footsteps.html

#49 DrBubb

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Posted 13 December 2008 - 01:32 AM

Great story, Wanderer.
Thanks for posting it.
I started a thread about P-tiles in the GEI-Networking section
The market is "bipolar", swinging back and forth from a focus on Inflation to Deflation. Bet on swings; and stay flexible. What are bipolar markets? See: http://tinyurl.com/GEI-Manix

#50 DrBubb

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 11:29 PM

History of the battery:
http://www.mpoweruk.com/history.htm
The market is "bipolar", swinging back and forth from a focus on Inflation to Deflation. Bet on swings; and stay flexible. What are bipolar markets? See: http://tinyurl.com/GEI-Manix

#51 Steve Netwriter

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 07:38 PM

Another option that is not electrical, and has the advantage that it uses material either that is already there, or is in plentiful supply.

Did you know you can store enough energy in a reasonable size cube (one that would fit under many gardens) to heat a house all winter.

So you can just collect solar energy through the summer (when you get most solar energy/day), store it in an insulated container, and retrieve the energy through the rest of the year.

A seasonal thermal store.

Obvious materials are: water, soil, sand.

It could be used for heating the house, heating water, and even cooking.

A heat to electricity converter could also add other output options.

Fiat: What starts becoming worth less eventually becomes worthless.

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#52 lupercal

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 10:08 PM


http://www.physorg.c...s178119983.html

QUOTE
Scientists at the Carnegie Institution have found for the first time that high pressure can be used to make a unique hydrogen-storage material. The discovery paves the way for an entirely new way to approach the hydrogen-storage problem. The researchers found that the normally unreactive, noble gas xenon combines with molecular hydrogen (H2) under pressure to form a previously unknown solid with unusual bonding chemistry. The experiments are the first time these elements have been combined to form a stable compound. The discovery debuts a new family of materials, which could boost new hydrogen technologies.



QUOTE
The thing is the future isn't something that's rammed down our throats. The future is a choice. The human race is six or seven billion odd people each of which is making choices every day. You add up all those choices and that's the direction of humanity. Each of us has fairly small voices, but you add up a lot of small voices and you get big voices.
James Gosling Coder.

#53 ILoveGreen

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 12:06 AM

QUOTE (DrBubb @ Jan 7 2009, 12:29 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Wow, that was actually quite interesting!

#54 sustainable cities project

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 05:15 AM

Beyond Battery Technologies

This topic has some interesting views and considerations, to which I want to add something about high density Amp Hour storage for long duration without chemical electrolytes. And hence this is another technology to invest in that has a great potential to grow beyond battery technologies for the numerous merits listed below.

http://www.evanscap.com/




Evans Capaterry Products

"Capattery style super capacitors are designed for longer duration power hold-up and memory back-up applications. Full operating temperature range of -55C to 85C." ~ Evans Capacitor

A salesman at Evans told me that the largest Capattery (a Super Capacitor) that they have made on special order was 300 Farads. Which is equal to 300 A hour at 1 volt. But these Capattery technologies can hold a much higher voltage than 1 volt. A 12 volt capacitor rated for 300 A hour is equal to a deep cycle marine battery.

The Super Capacitor is capable of charging faster than a chemical battery. And does not require maintanance. And does not have toxic chemical waste such as sulfuric acid, nor lead, not lithium to worry about. Hence is environmentally friendly. It can last for 20 years or more and can hold a charge that long too ~ with little loss.

According to a feature in the Federal Laboratory Consortium News Letter a fews years back. A new diamond deposit dielectric was invented that can make Super Capacitors of larger Farad values but smaller in size. And the diamond hard dielectric will hold up to larger voltages. Hence I am looking to see even more interesting Super Capacitor technologies.

Anyways this will solve the problem with batteries for use in hybird electric automobiles and home grid tie battery banks. Which have no chemical maintanance and which last longer, as well as will not create a enviornmental problem. The only reason the Evans and other Super Capacitor companies are not making larger stock sizes than 1 Farad. Is that at the moment no one has created a demand. But demand will bring such things to market. You can inquire of what Evans can do, and also check out other potentially new emerging companies that make Super Caps.

All you have to do is decide you want to invest into Super Capacitor technologies for green investments. And so, I would suggest that you keep an eye on this market and it's innovations and trends. And so, not always be looking at strictly battery technologies. I personally think these will make better batteries.




#55 julius

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 03:01 PM

I would think a few times before hosting 100kwh of batteries in my basement, particularly of an untested technology. That aside, obvious this is a rather prospective area for research and batteries could be hosted more centrally as well.




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